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    #16
    What do you all think of getting the gel bike gloves? Would the gel be in the right place, or to far down?
    T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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      #17
      Thanks Arndog for all of your amazing info. We will look at the Ergo grips, and my Dad definitely needs a new pair of gloves. Good thought. He is still wearing the same pair he got in rehab almost 5 years ago and they are barely intact!! He has also started to develop some intermittent elbow pain, and now I realize it is probably related to his crutches as well. So we need to work on this....

      Thanks Katja for the additional info on Arbin crutches. That's interesting you found them heavy. We were wondering how critical it is to keep them light. That was one reason my Dad was hesitant to try a bariatric crutch (which could utilize the larger tip) - if it was just too heavy.

      Now I realize why we "hear" my father so clearly walking down the hallway. The rattle of the crutch button in those adjustable holes.... I wonder if my father even notices? For us, it is kind of a nice sound.... we know he's coming. But I can see how some of you would rather be silent. It is useful, because then we "hear" whenever he has a mis-step/stumble.... the metronome skips...

      How I wish there was a place you could go and just try all the different crutches out.... Since some of these crutches are quite pricey, it would nice.

      Arndog, I am very jealous of your great chamber music opportunities. Who knew that Reno was such a classical music stomping ground? I didn't know that Quartet for the End of Time was Shiffrin's.... that must have been something to see. I don't think I've ever heard that masterpiece performed professionally, although it is one of my favorites.

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        #18
        Originally posted by hlh View Post
        How I wish there was a place you could go and just try all the different crutches out.... Since some of these crutches are quite pricey, it would nice.
        Fetterman's were really good about letting me try them and return them. I didn't take them outside. I did have to pay return shipping.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Katja View Post
          The Arbin Quickstep crutches are extremely sturdy. They are oval in cross section (ie, thicker), and weigh 800 g apiece (almost twice as much as the WalkEasy 461s). I ordered them from Fetterman to try them out, and wound up returning them mostly because of the weight issue.
          ...plus Tornado tips are pretty hefty in and of themselves, and Fetterman replaces the Arbin Quickstep tips with Tornados. The Fetterman tips add heft to my WalkEasies, but since they're such lightweight crutches to begin with, it's not a problem - I can see how Quicksteps plus Tornado tips would be quite a heavy proposition!

          I was very tempted to get a pair of SideStix awhile back, but have only one functional hand and couldn't break them down and do maintenance. They might, indeed, be just the thing for your dad, hlh.
          MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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            #20
            Bonnette makes a very good point about Fetterman Tornado Tips being hefty. Yes they are great tips but there is a price - and that is weight.
            There are 2 weights -
            1. total weight
            2. swing weight
            The Tornado tips really increase the swing weight and I would contend that that is what a crutch user will feel. More than the total weight. I have thought about this a lot because the SideStixs total weight is not particularly light so I wondered why they are so comfortable. I think that with the light tips that they come with the swing weight is low and I perceive them as light. Plus, you don't actually light crutches much. Maybe you engage your trapezius muscle a bit and fire the bicep a bit to raise them 2 inches max to clear the ground, but the main movement is swinging them , hence the perception that swing weight is critical. So the SideStix with the carbon fiber tube and their light tip "feels" light although total weight isn't really. (5 lbs/pair).

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              #21
              Hi guys,
              This is a great discussion, everyone is so positive and helpful! I just wanted to respond to a couple of things, just so we can help you understand what SideStix are (and aren't!) good for.

              Originally posted by hlh View Post
              How I wish there was a place you could go and just try all the different crutches out.... Since some of these crutches are quite pricey, it would nice.
              We offer a full 30-day money-back guarantee, so you would be free to try SideStix if you decided to go that route. Our policy is similar to Fetterman's in that you would have to pay the return shipping. If you have extended benefits you can get 100% coverage for SideStix, which makes the price a non-factor! We're very aware that not everyone can afford a $600-$800 pair of crutches, and we're working really hard to make them easier to get and more affordable.

              I totally agree with some of the members here that Fetterman Tornado tips are they way to go for most crutch users. They articulate pretty well and last for awhile. We offer articulating rotating feet as an attachment, but we wouldn't recommend that for anyone other than a swing gait walker (where your leg(s) swing past the crutches with each step). Even we put Tornado tips on our crutches, they're just a good tip.

              Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
              I was very tempted to get a pair of SideStix awhile back, but have only one functional hand and couldn't break them down and do maintenance.
              Bonette, I'm not sure what type of gait you have when using crutches, but maintenance would only be required if you outfitted your crutches with the rotating articulating feet. Other than that, they require no maintenance. You would maybe need someone to help you set them up out of the box however.

              If you aren't interested in SideStix as a whole or they are out of your price range, but still want a better grip, you can get the Ergon grips we use at a bike store and they can probably help you install them too. We're working on a really exciting new handgrip but it is still in the prototype phase, so Ergon really is your best bet.

              I really am not trying to sell anyone on anything, as I really respect this board and the contributors, but I wanted to respond to a few things people seemed unsure about.

              Thanks everyone!

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                #22
                Originally posted by SideStix View Post
                Bonette, I'm not sure what type of gait you have when using crutches, but maintenance would only be required if you outfitted your crutches with the rotating articulating feet. Other than that, they require no maintenance. You would maybe need someone to help you set them up out of the box however.
                What excellent information! Thanks so much - it's good to know that a person wouldn't necessarily need to break SideStix down for maintenance. I'm also glad to learn that it's possible to purchase your ergonomic handgrips separately - and that you endorse the Tornado tip.

                hlh, lots to think about!
                MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                  ...plus Tornado tips are pretty hefty in and of themselves, and Fetterman replaces the Arbin Quickstep tips with Tornados.
                  I asked Fetterman to send me the original Quickstep tips as well, which they don't normally do (I think they just toss them). If I had kept the Quicksteps, I probably would have swapped the tips back out - the Tornado tips were odd on the Quicksteps because of the oval cross section. The crutches felt a little unsteady when planting them ahead of my feet where the top of the Tornado tip doesn't actually hug the metal.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Katja View Post
                    I asked Fetterman to send me the original Quickstep tips as well, which they don't normally do (I think they just toss them). If I had kept the Quicksteps, I probably would have swapped the tips back out - the Tornado tips were odd on the Quicksteps because of the oval cross section. The crutches felt a little unsteady when planting them ahead of my feet where the top of the Tornado tip doesn't actually hug the metal.
                    You know, I was thinking that Quicksteps with Tornado tips might not be the best combo. The line of the Quickstep is sleek and elegant, and its original tip finishes the design in a way that not only looks good, but provides a broad, stable base for walking. When I look at pictures of the Quickstep, it's hard to imagine them accommodating Tornado tips - especially considering the oval shape of the tubes. Like you, if I ordered a pair, I would want the original tips in addition to the Tornadoes.
                    MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                      #25
                      Has anyone gotten their medical insurance to reimburse the more expensive crutches or tips? How did you do that?

                      I guess the nice forearm crutches/tips are our Tilite wheelchair.... although unfortunately most of us need one of those as well!

                      Thanks again for all of your discussions.

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                        #26
                        And which padded gloves do you guys use? Arndog?

                        thanks again.

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                          #27
                          If your father's grip is strong, he will benefit from padded gloves. My grip is very weak bilaterally and it's hard to wrap my fingers around the handgrips of my crutches - it would be impossible, with the added bulk of padding. So I use football gloves, which have a flat latex-type material sewn onto the palms and palmar aspects of the fingers. Your dad could try out different types of gloves at bike and sporting goods stores and see what works best with his handgrips.
                          MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                            #28
                            HLH -agree with Bonnette - go to a "sports authority" type store that has both bike and other sports I would start with gel gloves from a bike store or department-

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                              #29
                              Thanks Bonnette and Arndog. He has only used wheelchair gloves up to this point.

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by hlh View Post
                                Has anyone gotten their medical insurance to reimburse the more expensive crutches or tips? How did you do that?
                                Hi hlh, I'm not sure what your medical coverage is currently but we have 100% coverage through extended benefits. You can get more info at http://sidestix.com/coverage-options/. We've tried to make the process as painless as possible . As always if anyone here has any questions you can reach me day or night at 'josh AT sidestix.com' or @sidestix on Twitter.

                                I wish I had more to add on the subject of gloves, but I think Arndog and Bonnette have given great feedback already. Most of our glove-wearing users that wear biking gloves (mainly gel like Arndog suggested) or something similar.

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