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  • Locomotion (Not Locomotor) training

    The start of the new year I am planning to start Locomotion training has anyone experienced this please let me know was it effective and how did you enjoy it,
    Thanks
    Appreciate the small gains and the large ones will be ignored!!

  • #2
    Never heard of it Warren. Is that like a train engineer. Always wanted to be one of those. Good luck if you do. Glad to see your posts.

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    • #3
      LOL Patrick..See link below
      http://www.christopherreeve.org/site...bilitation.htm

      has anyone taken this training recently saw some old links in 2005. Any new info would be appreciated. I think the program are for incompletes with hand function.
      Appreciate the small gains and the large ones will be ignored!!

      Comment


      • #4
        I know a few folks that participated in the Reeve Neuro Recovery Network (NRN). They are not CareCure members so let me know if you want info or to be introduced.
        McGee is the longest standing center.
        Every day I wake up is a good one

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        • #5
          sounds similar to Projest Walk, SCI-Step, and those type organizations. it is a good way to really find out how injured you are if you are willing to put in the effort, it takes a lot of focus and determination. I attended sci-step for the week trial to answer some of those questions, you'll learn some things even if you will never walk as far as some strength training and you'll realize the importance of working out. my main reason for going was to try FES and to see if standing was even an option and possibly walking at some parrallel bars. walking would be great, even if arm crutches were neccessary, but i'd prefer to have good shoulders when i get older, so that is something to consider. i have gotten to where i can bend and straighten my legs though and i can hold my legs straight to help with transfers and such, but not strong enough to stand yet. and i have to pick myself up to straighten legs, i'm kinda controlling the tone to help, but i am having to hold them straight, so it's not all tone. try it out and good luck.

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          • #6
            the neuro recovery network has an alliance with magee.my son did his inpatient therapy at magee.we were not pleased with the therapy at magee.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by nrf View Post
              the neuro recovery network has an alliance with magee.my son did his inpatient therapy at magee.we were not pleased with the therapy at magee.
              NRN at Magee is a separate entity from their inpatient program. There are a number of NRN sites besides Magee if you prefer to go elsewhere.
              Every day I wake up is a good one

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              • #8
                if "Locomotion training " is having people move your legs on a treadmill while your suspended?.....i wouldnt do it..thats nothing but bad form, alot of wear on your hips and joints...
                the locomat pro is the way to go.....moves your legs, weight bearing can be adjusted , proper walking form, gives bio-feedback as to how much you are doing and from what leg and which part
                - Rolling Thru Life -

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by roc21 View Post
                  if "Locomotion training " is having people move your legs on a treadmill while your suspended?.....i wouldnt do it..thats nothing but bad form, alot of wear on your hips and joints...
                  the locomat pro is the way to go.....moves your legs, weight bearing can be adjusted , proper walking form, gives bio-feedback as to how much you are doing and from what leg and which part
                  NRN gives all of the same feedback.
                  Every day I wake up is a good one

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    There are several theories on movement. (Environmental theory, dynamic theory, motor program theory…). I personally believe that all of the theories play a part in our development and our various forms of locomotion (crawl, swim, walk, run…). I am not aware of any research indicating that one form of locomotion (gait) training is superior to another. There are numerous body weight support treadmill training (BWSTT) systems on the market. Additionally, there is training available from individuals like Dr. Harkema and Dr. Field-Fote regarding techniques for BWSTT. From a research perspective it is important to understand the role of the equipment and/or manual/robotic techniques necessary for validity and reliability. With that said, very few facilities, organizations, and families have access to the resources/employees/manpower required. Personally, I’m not sure how important perfect form is during locomotion training (assuming basic musculoskeletal safety is met). I do believe that increased/maximized afferent/sensory information plays a very important role (CPG, quality of movement, righting reactions…). If every movement is perfectly controlled (trunk/hip/knee/ankle…) and there is little to no weight through the individuals’ limbs, other than CPG (which is important) what is there for the body to learn?
                    “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

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                    • #11
                      willy,

                      you have my vote.whatever you want to run for you have my vote.

                      thank you for the effort you put into helping.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here is a good article looking at various forms of gait/locomotion training.

                        Phys Ther. 2011 Jan;91(1):48-60. Epub 2010 Nov 4.

                        Influence of a locomotor training approach on walking speed and distance in people with chronic spinal cord injury: a randomized clinical trial.
                        Field-Fote EC, Roach KE.

                        Department of Physical Therapy, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA. edee@miami.edu

                        Comment in:

                        Phys Ther. 2011 Jan;91(1):60-2; author reply 62.

                        Abstract
                        BACKGROUND: Impaired walking limits function after spinal cord injury (SCI), but training-related improvements are possible even in people with chronic motor incomplete SCI.

                        OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to compare changes in walking speed and distance associated with 4 locomotor training approaches.

                        DESIGN: This study was a single-blind, randomized clinical trial.

                        SETTING: This study was conducted in a rehabilitation research laboratory.

                        PARTICIPANTS: Participants were people with minimal walking function due to chronic SCI.

                        INTERVENTION: Participants (n=74) trained 5 days per week for 12 weeks with the following approaches: treadmill-based training with manual assistance (TM), treadmill-based training with stimulation (TS), overground training with stimulation (OG), and treadmill-based training with robotic assistance (LR).

                        MEASUREMENTS: Overground walking speed and distance were the primary outcome measures.

                        RESULTS: In participants who completed the training (n=64), there were overall effects for speed (effect size index [d]=0.33) and distance (d=0.35). For speed, there were no significant between-group differences; however, distance gains were greatest with OG. Effect sizes for speed and distance were largest with OG (d=0.43 and d=0.40, respectively). Effect sizes for speed were the same for TM and TS (d=0.28); there was no effect for LR. The effect size for distance was greater with TS (d=0.16) than with TM or LR, for which there was no effect. Ten participants who improved with training were retested at least 6 months after training; walking speed at this time was slower than that at the conclusion of training but remained faster than before training.

                        LIMITATIONS: It is unknown whether the training dosage and the emphasis on training speed were optimal. Robotic training that requires active participation would likely yield different results.

                        CONCLUSIONS: In people with chronic motor incomplete SCI, walking speed improved with both overground training and treadmill-based training; however, walking distance improved to a greater extent with overground training.

                        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21051593
                        “As the cast of villains in SCI is vast and collaborative, so too must be the chorus of hero's that rise to meet them” Ramer et al 2005

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                        • #13
                          Wild Willy Thanks for great input and article..Seems like ambulating yourself overground is the best medicine. Nonetheless, I am 2 yrs post op I can ambulate with walker 750-1000 ft Max. I use my tone. Recently done handwalk about 100 ft.

                          According to NRN therapist the biggest gains realized were ASIA Cs improving to ASIA Ds. I am currently an ASIA D from and ASIA C post op.

                          So in short it seems like you gotta just MOVE?
                          Appreciate the small gains and the large ones will be ignored!!

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