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    #16
    Roho has a product line for ATV and motorcycles. You might want to check out some of their offerings and see if any can meet your needs.

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      #17
      You could purchase a sheet of honeycomb from Supracore (http://www.supracor.com/custom/honeycomb_sheets.htm) and have someone upholster your seat with it. I would like to do that with the seats in my husband's boat but I haven't done it yet.

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        #18
        I went hunting on an atv, on it for ~6-7 hours a day for two days. I just took my 4" hi-pro Roho and put it on the seat.

        It folded over the edges so that the inside of my legs were also against it. Took a little while to get used to the "wobble effect", but it worked out great.

        You can't see it in this pic, but my feet still rested in the trough. You can see the backrest and seatbelt setup a little. Riding one with floorboards is the way to go, my feet never flopped out. Hawkeyes is right, your arms provide all the side-to-side support.(I did fine until I decided to do a "180", almost launched myself out of the seat ) I'm a T10.

        Last edited by McDuff; 12 Feb 2009, 7:26 PM.
        "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

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          #19
          I guess I ride harder than you guys. My feet fall out of the floor pans when I get wild and crazy driving too fast on the twisty trails.

          I wear heavy hiking boots when I ride which also help keep my feet on-board. I wouldn't recommend tying you feet to the rig because if it tips over or rolls, you will be tied to it. Also when riding, wearing a couple of layers of clothes (long johns under pants, or overalls) allows more of the sliding to take place between clothing and not your skin. I also do frequent pressure relief shifts when I stop and I even lay back prone on my back on occasion to redistribute the pressure.

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            #20
            Originally posted by LRImport View Post
            Also when riding, wearing a couple of layers of clothes (long johns under pants, or overalls) allows more of the sliding to take place between clothing and not your skin.
            This is the key!

            I raced a Honda Odyssey for 3 years right after my paralysis, including the California State Championships in 1985. An UN-SUSPENDED Odyssey, model 1982. Frequently bounced 3-4 feet in the air and saw stars when I hit back down. [EDIT: Can you believe this was the MOST FUN THING I EVER DID?!?!?!!?]

            Had a similar problem on my back, from the shearing on the seat back. Used to get painful sores after each 45 minute race (on motocross tracks).

            So, a couple of things that worked wonders:

            1) Wear a kidney belt. They really make the bumps bearable, to where they won't knock the wind out of you.

            2) I sewed a 1/2" thick piece of medium density foam as a back protector to the top of the kidney belt. NEVER had a problem after that. Absolutely made ALL the difference, as the sliding occurred between the foam and my seat.

            Maybe you could get someone to sew (velcro?) a butt/thigh pad to your riding pants or even some under-garment. But wear a kidney belt, too!
            Last edited by a la carte; 10 Jul 2011, 3:02 PM.

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              #21
              Originally posted by parapete View Post
              I have a Bombardier 4 wheeler and just developed a shear sore on the top/inside of left thigh, right below my butt/cleft. I am treating it and my doctor is pleased. My ? is, i don't want to give up riding. Does anyone have a recommended cushion for it. I was using a jay protector but that caused some of the problem as i kept sliding in the cushion, no matter how tight i made the straps. Any suggestions out there? I was looking at the roho airhawk line but wondering if that would do what i am looking for. Thanks in advance
              Jay protectors are a great concept but in many respects useless. I'd love to have one custom made so it stays in place. I ride a lot of different on and off road toys and over the years have tried different setups.
              I typically sit on a 2" roho on my wheelchair and have used it in the past on 4 wheelers but they sure don't help with balance and anything that lifts you higher of the stock seat changes your whole sitting position which also promotes bad posture and hence, back pain. For a few years now I have used the Supracor strips and incorporated it into the stock seat so as not to sit myself higher. If you have the money, a good motorcycle seat guy can help shape the existing foam (slice away) and add a layer of supracor. You can shape the seat to give you better support too. If money is tight you can try taking something like a .5" yoga mat and cutting it to fit on top of existing seat. In the experimental stages I cut from a roll of industrial style velcro to attach. OR if you're happy enough, take the seat cover off, grab a nice electric kitchen knife and a nice sharp fillet knife and shape it yourself. Then just take it to upholstery shop and have them make you a new cover.
              Best of luck,
              roller

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                #22
                Originally posted by LRImport View Post
                I guess I ride harder than you guys. My feet fall out of the floor pans when I get wild and crazy driving too fast on the twisty trails.

                I wear heavy hiking boots when I ride which also help keep my feet on-board. I wouldn't recommend tying you feet to the rig because if it tips over or rolls, you will be tied to it. Also when riding, wearing a couple of layers of clothes (long johns under pants, or overalls) allows more of the sliding to take place between clothing and not your skin. I also do frequent pressure relief shifts when I stop and I even lay back prone on my back on occasion to redistribute the pressure.
                Have you tried using short bungies over your toes? Your feet will release if your body comes away from the machine.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by roller View Post
                  Have you tried using short bungies over your toes? Your feet will release if your body comes away from the machine.
                  No, I hadn't thought of that idea but I'm really leery about being attached to the machine in any manner.

                  It's not a bad idea though. I'll give it some thought and see what I can rig up. Usually the heavy hiking boots I now wear hold my feet on much better than high top tennis shoes used to.

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