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Tuning in a trial ZRA chair

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    #16
    Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
    Oh boy, hate hearing that SR. If it's not healing as expected, get the flap done and save yourself months or years of grief laying down. I think of the years wasted because I didn't want to get laid up for 6 weeks laying down 24/7 in a Clinitron. Once, it got resolved, I haven't had an issue going on 5 years now. I thought laying down for a couple hours a day then up for the rest of the day was okay; it wasn't. First thing is to get a seating eval and proper cushion, what may good for your wife, may be the opposite for you. Rohos are not necessarily the best cushion to use. For me, they were the worst in the eval.
    Stay strong; you'll get thru this.
    Thanks for your kind thoughts and words Patrick. It is not major at this point(fingers crossed), it is the bed rest that irks me and the fact that some other person is responsible. Cannot be proved but I am confident due to previous marks and scratches.

    Originally posted by pfcs49 View Post
    Yes! Injured in 95, I played on the tracks with my butt and though I was better than that. Then, after 17 years, the shit hit the fan: stage IV ischial ulcer. I got the flap surgery and spent 2 months on my back in a Clinitron. Can't imagine how I could do it but it wasn't terrible! Since then I'm a whole lot more careful. Don't want to go through it again.
    Yeah, I was a whole lot careful Phil. Trouble is that at his point I rely on others for this care and one of them does not excell or come close. The others are brilliant in what they do.
    Like everyone, "Don't want to go through it again".

    Onto the chair. I slammed my 18 x 18 cushion further back to give me an inch of clearance behind my knees - a good difference. I changed casters to 4" softs, lifted the camber tube and now have it with 3 3/4" dump. The camber tube is at its highest now with no more frame lowering adjustment unless I reverse the camber clamp arms. COG is 3 11/16".
    I am looking at a possible +1" frame and 80* front , Straight taper front to minimise contact with my lazy right leg. Maybe a higher back so I can shorten it to my liking later if required. I still feel like I need/want to sit further back into the chair.
    TiLite already make adjustable chairs for small folks to grow in- perhaps they could look further?
    This sample chair already has the floating front caster you mentioned Patrick.
    Well, I'm reasonably heavy and rolling along top heavy on a frame with so much inherent spring energy potential when stopping abruptly doesn't appeal much. And I still like to go fast whenever the opportunity arises.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ao6bI21QAAc
    Plus I like the extra frame of the TRA for carrying under-sling items.
    1" diameter tube will also give me more options for clamps and such, plus I get another 1/2' of clearance between the frame tubes for that lazy leg.
    A sample TRA would be nice so I can feel the difference and trial load it into my car to see what the fuss is about. A few videos show them being stowed without much trouble; none of them into a GTI though Phil
    Last edited by slow_runner; 17 Apr 2021, 9:25 PM.

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      #17
      Listening to the arguements and discussion on the pros and cons of transferring ZRA and TRA chairs into vehicles, I decide to trial them out. Using a friends TRA and his old TR2, the trial ZRA and my 2GX I set about my real time education yesterday.
      Our car is a '95 Toyota Corona (Carina). With the drivers seat moved back on the runners and tilted well back I tried the ZRA first. The immediate difference/ obstacle I found was removing the wheels - I am used to the ease of my collapsible 2GX. Removing the solid back was easy enough but another component to stow.
      I found it a bit of a mission moving the ZRA across to the front passenger seat but doable. The chair was placed on the seat upside down with the footplate to the front. Securing it in place with the seatbelt was achieved by means of the axle assembly strut. Not ideal but better than it sitting loose.
      Next was the TRA which I found to be no more difficult to transfer than the ZRA.The extra tubing did not impede the transfer, rather they were useful for the handling.
      Next , for curiosity sake, was the TR2. What I noticed immediately was the light frame, what a difference.
      Lastly I reacquainted myself with transferring my 2GX folder. The previous time was prior to my recent fresh spinal injury back in November 2020.
      Transferring the 2GX wins hands down. However, it loses in the handling stakes
      This exercise has reinforced my preference for the TRA.
      Last edited by slow_runner; 22 Apr 2021, 11:11 AM.

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        #18
        Something I discovered transferring 8-10 different chairs into vehicles (as a T12 para) is the front end angle makes a HUGE difference. Closer to 90 is harder. Closer to 75 is easier, by a wide margin. The chair itself has a longer wheelbase with a shallower angle but can be inches shorter, caster to top frame rail, which is the dimension that matters a lot for me pulling it between my body and steering wheel. I settled on 85, since it was noticeably easier than 90 but still tucked my feet. 80deg was easiest. 75 was too long.

        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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          #19
          Originally posted by Oddity View Post
          Something I discovered transferring 8-10 different chairs into vehicles (as a T12 para) is the front end angle makes a HUGE difference. Closer to 90 is harder. Closer to 75 is easier, by a wide margin. The chair itself has a longer wheelbase with a shallower angle but can be inches shorter, caster to top frame rail, which is the dimension that matters a lot for me pulling it between my body and steering wheel. I settled on 85, since it was noticeably easier than 90 but still tucked my feet. 80deg was easiest. 75 was too long.
          Both of my chairs are 90* frames. Perhaps that's why, on car transfers, I put my leg (formerly legs) in first. Where the downside of a 90* frame really shows up is in my bed transfers; the leg stays in the front bay of the wheelchair and limits how far I initially get onto the bed until I go back for it and then hump further onto the bed.
          69yo male T12 complete since 1995
          NW NJ

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