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Adjustable beds? ISO that platform that raises 10 inches and lowers 10 inches

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    Adjustable beds? ISO that platform that raises 10 inches and lowers 10 inches

    Nowadays, there are a variety of different adjustable mattresses available from large retail furniture manufacturers. For a while – the Tempur-Pedic adjustable framework great; however, due to age and degenerative bones, I need to find a mattress that will raise about a foot and lower about afoot.

    I know about Craftmatic adjustable and https://medmartonline.com/parks-heal...adjustable-bed and Kalmia
    The bed, but anyone has any solutions; please let me know because I appreciate my sleep number, and I would rather not lose it.
    Any thoughts?

    #2
    What size bed? Hospital? Twin? Double? Queen? King? Dual California King?

    Don't confuse mattress systems and bed frames. Many are interchangeable. The measurement you need to look for is deck height. That is the distance from the floor to the part of the bed frame on which the mattress rests. Solid decks or wire mesh decks give more support (vs. springs), especially if you are using a specialty pressure reducing mattress (either foam or air).

    For high/lo powered adjustable beds frames, many like Transfer Master. https://www.transfermaster.com/

    Other options include these companies:

    https://flexabed.com/adjustable_beds...beds-for-home/

    https://assuredcomfortbed.com/

    One consideration is the base of the bed frame. If there is any possibility that you may now (or in the future) need to use a portable floor based mechanical lift for transfers (like a Hoyer lift) be sure that the bed frame does not have a box base and would allow a lift legs to get underneath the bed.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      Full-size sleep number bed with an adjustable base. The base does not have the high low feature and the information you provided is leagues better than I can imagine. Thank you so much – this is incredibly helpful information. I would not have found it on my own.

      Comment


        #4
        Are the primary reasons people purchase adjustable beds instead of getting a traditional hospital bed for aesthetics and/or being able to get a larger bed? Or are there other variables?

        My Dad needs an adjustable bed as well, and I suspect he will need a base that has space for a Hoyer lift, just in case. He is 6 foot 2 inch and has a King sized regular bed now, but uses half of the bed for storing things that he likes being able to reach when in bed. He would probably get a smaller bed if he was paying out of pocket. He has wounds now and may need a pressure relieving mattress or overlay.

        Comment


          #5
          Most insurances will not cover non-hospital beds. That is certainly true of both the VA and Medicare. So not everyone can afford an non-hospital bed. The reasons for choosing a non-hospital bed will vary from person to person. Aesthetics is often a consideration, as is sharing a bed with a partner for many. Specialty pressure reducing mattresses often only come in hospital bed sizes...either 35" wide or bariatric 40" or 42", so to use one of those generally you will need a hospital bed frame, not an adjustable bed. When I worked at the VA, we could only get a bariatric sized hospital bed frame or mattress for those with a BMI of 35 or more. Some adjustable beds cannot accommodate a replacement mattresses as well.

          Perhaps your dad could get an overbed table to store all his stuff if changing to a hospital bed frame. There are some that have shelves in addition to the table top.
          Here is one example: https://homrest.com/products/bedside...xoCUIUQAvD_BwE

          Here is another: https://www.wayfair.com/Inbox-Zero--...RoCwuUQAvD_BwE

          And here: https://www.walmart.com/ip/S-morebuy...Seni/264254211

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            Most insurances will not cover non-hospital beds. That is certainly true of both the VA and Medicare. So not everyone can afford an non-hospital bed. The reasons for choosing a non-hospital bed will vary from person to person. Aesthetics is often a consideration, as is sharing a bed with a partner for many. Specialty pressure reducing mattresses often only come in hospital bed sizes...either 35" wide or bariatric 40" or 42", so to use one of those generally you will need a hospital bed frame, not an adjustable bed. When I worked at the VA, we could only get a bariatric sized hospital bed frame or mattress for those with a BMI of 35 or more. Some adjustable beds cannot accommodate a replacement mattresses as well.

            Perhaps your dad could get an overbed table to store all his stuff if changing to a hospital bed frame. There are some that have shelves in addition to the table top.
            Here is one example: https://homrest.com/products/bedside...xoCUIUQAvD_BwE

            Here is another: https://www.wayfair.com/Inbox-Zero--...RoCwuUQAvD_BwE

            And here: https://www.walmart.com/ip/S-morebuy...Seni/264254211

            (KLD)

            Thanks this is helpful. He has one of those long bedside tables now, like you see in the hospitals (and your last link). So yes, it would help to get one for the other side if he had a smaller bed, and one with shelves would be really nice.

            A hoyer lift really wouldn't fit in his bedroom unless he got a smaller bed, to be honest....

            It's too bad though, as he would really like something like a full sized bed at least, but paying all that $$ would be hard for him to justify if the non-hospital pricey beds didn't offer additional benefits.

            It surprises me that Medicare doesn't cover fully adjustable beds for folks with SCI. To be truly independent, you need to be able to move the height of the bed yourself. My Dad needs a different height for getting in/ out of bed if he is moving to his wheelchair or his crutches or his walker, and needs a different height if he is sitting on the side of the bed to cath or do an instillation. All are different, or else he hurts his skin or shoulders etc... I hope they will let us pay for the upcharge for a fully adjustable bed if he decides to go that route.

            Comment


              #7
              Since you're in the Boston area I figured I'd mention that Cardi's has a fully adjustable bed frame that is designed to look like a normal bed, rather than a hospital bed. It goes up and down, but also has the head and foot raise functions. Pricey, but it has served me well and I was actually able to get a grant so it could be worth looking at.

              https://www.cardis.com/pages/niropedic-lift
              C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by ejl10 View Post
                Since you're in the Boston area I figured I'd mention that Cardi's has a fully adjustable bed frame that is designed to look like a normal bed, rather than a hospital bed. It goes up and down, but also has the head and foot raise functions. Pricey, but it has served me well and I was actually able to get a grant so it could be worth looking at.

                https://www.cardis.com/pages/niropedic-lift

                Thanks for sharing this. Why did you decide on this bed compared with some of the other brands? And why not a (free) hospital bed?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by hlh View Post


                  Thanks for sharing this. Why did you decide on this bed compared with some of the other brands? And why not a (free) hospital bed?
                  From what I found, it's rare to find adjustable beds that move up and down in addition to the traditional head and foot raise features. Honestly, this is the only conventional bed we found of its kind. As for why I didn't want a hospital bed, it was really so that my girlfriend and I could share the same bed together. Now a few years later I'm glad to be sleeping in a more conventional bed, as it just feels more natural.
                  C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by ejl10 View Post

                    From what I found, it's rare to find adjustable beds that move up and down in addition to the traditional head and foot raise features. Honestly, this is the only conventional bed we found of its kind. As for why I didn't want a hospital bed, it was really so that my girlfriend and I could share the same bed together. Now a few years later I'm glad to be sleeping in a more conventional bed, as it just feels more natural.
                    Thanks for your info! All I really want is a little help (downhill transfers) and I think you gave me the answer. I'll be 74 soon and my the uphill transfer into my chair is beginning to be a challenge I don't need!
                    69yo male T12 complete since 1995
                    NW NJ

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ejl10 View Post
                      Since you're in the Boston area I figured I'd mention that Cardi's has a fully adjustable bed frame that is designed to look like a normal bed, rather than a hospital bed. It goes up and down, but also has the head and foot raise functions. Pricey, but it has served me well and I was actually able to get a grant so it could be worth looking at.

                      https://www.cardis.com/pages/niropedic-lift
                      Did you try out mattresses or just go with memory foam? Just wondering which mattress would be good for someone who has had skin breakdown? If I am recalling right, you have had some skin issues.

                      Comment


                      • ejl10
                        ejl10 commented
                        Editing a comment
                        You're exactly right, I did have a major pressure sore problem that resulted in flap surgery just weeks after leaving inpatient. Always be careful that you understand how to properly inflate a Roho! As a result, in the early days I actually used a Volkner turning system mattress topper to ensure proper healing and recovery. Fortunately, I've gotten much better and no longer seem as prone to skin breakdown as I once was. Now I use a memory foam mattress. Specifically, I use the Nectar, though I wouldn't necessarily recommend it because the edges aren't very firm and it makes sitting on the edge of the bed kind of harrowing. I used to have a Casper, and it was much better, though also much more expensive. Anyway, in both cases I haven't had any more skin issues, and at this point I raise my feet overnight but don't even turn.
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