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Facebook Rejecting Adaptive Clothing Companies Ads?

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  • slow_runner
    replied
    Originally posted by gjnl View Post
    I'm not so surprise as I am curious what the motivation is for rejecting medical/healthcare products and services advertisements.
    Could it be that the Zuckerberg company wishes to discriminate the disability community? If it is not the wish then the result of its policy is the same; discrimination.
    If it is so, that would appear to put facebook in the company of A holes who have gone before him and yet to come.
    What next? Ovens?

    I am on facebook only recently as it is the necessary means for access and communication with members of the Spinal Support NZ site.
    facebook tries (does) to maneuver and direct to seemingly every other place within its sphere.
    I have a blocker that I hope is working to eliminate facebooks ability to follow me wherever I venture.
    Bastards!
    Last edited by slow_runner; 16 Feb 2021, 4:16 AM.

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  • gjnl
    replied
    I'm not so surprise as I am curious what the motivation is for rejecting medical/healthcare products and services advertisements.

    Leave a comment:


  • slow_runner
    replied

    Facebook owns everything you care to post so it seems right that they can dictate what they choose to deny. Why be surprised?
    Last edited by slow_runner; 14 Feb 2021, 2:41 AM.

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  • vjls
    replied
    facebook is censoring a lot of things not just that

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  • gjnl
    started a topic Facebook Rejecting Adaptive Clothing Companies Ads?

    Facebook Rejecting Adaptive Clothing Companies Ads?

    Read more at: https://economictimes.indiatimes.com...w/80873083.cms
    Also reported in the New York Times. You can read it there if you have a subscription: https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/11/s...imination.html


    "Earlier this year Mighty Well, an adaptive clothing company that makes fashionable gear for people with disabilities, did something many newish brands do: It tried to place an ad for one of its most popular products on Facebook.

    The product in question was a gray zip-up hoodie with the message “I am immunocompromised — Please give me space.” The “immunocompromised” was in a white rectangle, kind of like Supreme’s red one. It has rave customer reviews on the company’s website.

    Facebook — or rather, Facebook’s automated advertising center — did not like the ad quite so much.

    It was rejected for violating policy — specifically, the promotion of “medical and health care products and services including medical devices,” though it included no such products. Mighty Well appealed the decision, and after some delay, the ruling changed.

    This may not seem like such a big deal. After all, the story ended well.

    But Mighty Well’s experience is simply one example of a pattern that has been going on for at least two years: The algorithms that are the gatekeepers to the commercial side of Facebook (as well as Instagram, which is owned by Facebook) routinely misidentify adaptive fashion products and block them from their platforms.

    At least six other small adaptive clothing companies have experienced the same problems as Mighty Well, which was founded four years ago by Emily Levy and Maria Del Mar Gomez — some to an even greater extent. One brand has been dealing with the issue on a weekly basis; another has had hundreds of products rejected. In each instance, the company has had to appeal each case on an item-by-item basis."


    I wonder why Facebook has this policy of not allowing advertisements for "medical and health care products and services?"

    NL

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