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Re-spoking wheels at a bike shop?

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    Re-spoking wheels at a bike shop?

    Hey everybody. Can I take my wheels to a bike shop to get new spokes? Is there a difference between spoking wheelchair tires and spoking bicycle tires? I ask because my puppy has chewed through some of my spokes and I would much rather take my wheels to the bike shop down the street then go through the cumbersome process of taking them to the wheelchair repair center.
    www.worldonwheels.ca

    #2
    There are no important differences, but some have a specific process to do correctly (ie Spinergy). They almost all come from bike wheel manufacturers anyway, so they are as near as makes no difference to the same re: maintaining and repairing.
    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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      #3
      Thanks, that’s what I thought.
      www.worldonwheels.ca

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        #4
        i asked a local bike shop once to change some spokes on my spinergys and he wouldnt do it he said it would cost too much you might aswell get new wheels, not to sure why

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          #5
          My bike guy changed out damaged spokes for m. Cost $50 included coming to my house with his truck.

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            #6
            I had a few of my Spinergys respoked. There's a poundage they use for tightness. Unfortunately, I couldn't find them. Spinergy or perhaps a DME could tell you.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
              I had a few of my Spinergys respoked. There's a poundage they use for tightness. Unfortunately, I couldn't find them. Spinergy or perhaps a DME could tell you.
              This could help. I have put these files in my folder, so thanks for the query Christopher. ATB

              https://www.49bespoke.com/images/sup...nergy_Info.pdf

              https://www.spinergy.com/content/bicycle/maintenance

              https://www.spinergy.com/content/bicycle/maintenance
              Last edited by slow_runner; 5 Feb 2021, 6:09 PM.

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                #8
                Originally posted by rAdGie View Post
                i asked a local bike shop once to change some spokes on my spinergys and he wouldnt do it he said it would cost too much you might aswell get new wheels, not to sure why
                Reasons? Too slow and the hourly charges are more than he is worth.??
                Avoid that operator like the plague

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                  #9
                  im not sure why he just didnt want to know :/ i would love to get my blades respoked but i would cost quite abit i would imagine

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by rAdGie View Post
                    i asked a local bike shop once to change some spokes on my spinergys and he wouldnt do it he said it would cost too much you might aswell get new wheels, not to sure why
                    I heard stories like this in the past, so out of curiosity I asked at my local bike shop. They said “sure we do spinergys all the time” and looked at me like I’d asked if they knew how to inflate a tire.

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                      #11
                      haha nice one, thats if you find the right shop, how much did they charge per spoke?

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                        #12
                        Thanks for all that info, S_R; I wonder how Spinergy's torque tool's numbers relate to things like inch-pounds?
                        Will I have to purchase their tool to find out? Doncha' just love these manufacturers?
                        69yo male T12 complete since 1995
                        NW NJ

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by pfcs49 View Post
                          Thanks for all that info, S_R; I wonder how Spinergy's torque tool's numbers relate to things like inch-pounds?
                          Will I have to purchase their tool to find out? Doncha' just love these manufacturers?
                          I know that you will also recognise the pricey torque tool is just a comparator, nothing more.
                          I too would be surprised if it is relevant to tables and values that engineers use daily.
                          An inch/pound torque wrench with a suitable attachment that has a fixed spread of say 4 inches could be cobbled up and measured against a new wheel to determine that torque value.
                          My opinion? Any home brew spring loaded contraption used in this way would suffice. A fisherman spring scale and a simple T tool comes to mind
                          As with all torque application, equal, sequence is more/most important than a given value; within reason.
                          Last edited by slow_runner; 10 Feb 2021, 5:29 AM.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by pfcs49 View Post
                            Thanks for all that info, S_R; I wonder how Spinergy's torque tool's numbers relate to things like inch-pounds?
                            Will I have to purchase their tool to find out? Doncha' just love these manufacturers?

                            Converting the amount of deflection between 2 spokes, as measured by using the Park spoke tool (expensive but still about 5x less than the best examples of other tools on the market doing the same thing!), into a meaningful torque value, at the spoke nipple nut, inside the rim, wouldn't be super useful, IMO. Park does publish a conversion table for the relative kg of force being applied to the 2 spokes, for any given reading on their tool.

                            Reason being, the 'torque' placed on the nut by a tool, and the 'effective torque' thereby applied to the spoke, can start to diverge as the wheel sees use. Contamination into the nipple from road dirt, dust, and grime as well as slight deformations in the rim, or spokes themselves, very often throws a standard torque wrench/value off. Meaning - setting using regular inch pounds at the nut can take more torque than is being applied to the spoke, because of these factors, in used wheels. (e.g. There is nothing stopping road crud from packing into the threads inside the nipple, requiring more force to overcome with the wrench at the nut that won't also be force applied to the spoke.)

                            Thats why the bike racing industry (both peddled and motor) has settled on measuring the deflection between the spokes themselves. Relying on "the same in/lb setting at every nut" is only guaranteed accurate when lacing up a new wheel from scratch or one that has been disassembled and thoroughly cleaned. That's why they (wheel manufacturers) don't typically offer up 'absolute torque' values to be used on spoke nipples/nuts.


                            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                            "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by slow_runner View Post

                              I know that you will also recognise the pricey torque tool is just a comparator, nothing more.
                              I too would be surprised if it is relevant to tables and values that engineers use daily.
                              An inch/pound torque wrench with a suitable attachment that has a fixed spread of say 4 inches could be cobbled up and measured against a new wheel to determine that torque value.
                              My opinion? Any home brew spring loaded contraption used in this way would suffice. A fisherman spring scale and a simple T tool comes to mind
                              As with all torque application, equal, sequence is more/most important than a given value; within reason.
                              Could you use that homegrown tool to accurately and repeatedly measure deflections between 2 spokes, at less than ~2mm, while applying between ~50-175kg of force? If so I'd love to know how to make it so I could rig one up myself. My Park tool is wearing out. They don't last forever, unfortunately, unless you buy a $250+ one for pro shops!
                              "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                              "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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