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    Home-made drainage system

    Hi all. At night, I'm hooked up to a night drainage bag, connected to an external catheter. The bag is 2000 mL, and I often fill the bag, or worry all night that I will fill the bag before my morning aid comes. I know there are larger size bags, or containers, but I'm not sure if these are covered by insurance. So I was wondering if simply running the tube into a gallon milk jug or something similar would be feasible. With using an external cath and reflex voiding, would there be issues with bacteria/infection with the opposite end of the tube open into the container?

    #2
    Fine if you are using only an external condom catheter and not an indwelling, but you should try to get your insurance to pay for a 4L version first. Medline makes one, as does Bard (#253509A and #153509), and I think Hollister as well.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      I use a 3 liter juice bottle. We drink a lot of juice so I can replace it often. I've drilled the lid to be a snug fit on 1/4" (nominal) vinyl tubing. I usually put a drop of superglue on the tubing to insure it doesn't pull out, though it never has. I use intermittent catheters so I don't know if this is true for condom caths, but the tubing fits like it was made to be a catheter extension. Twenty feet of tubing costs about seven dollars and gives me six extensions at 40" each. I've reused the same drilled lid for years. Though I've never over-filled one, I keep it in a two-gallon plastic bucket that makes it easier to transport, captures the tubing in the morning, and catches spills if there ever are any. I wouldn't have any interest in anything I had to clean, even if insurance did pay for it.

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        #4
        My father has the same issue. He uses 4L bags. He has never had a problem getting them covered.

        Have you started by telling your doctor the issue and asking them to change the prescription to 4 liter bags? Your supplier will make less profit off them, but should be able to supply them.

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          #5
          My Elder brother has same problem..He uses a 3L bags
          https://bathroomscan.com/best-bathro...-cans-reviews/

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            #6
            I'll look into coverage for the larger bags. Thanks

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              #7
              landrover, Happy New Year !
              In the event your health insurance does not covers the 4 L urine collector.
              You could connect your tubing to the lid by drilling a hole and glue it with silicone. I would recommend buying at least 12 lids and 3 containers.

              https://www.thecarycompany.com/plast...BoCOCUQAvD_BwE

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                #8
                When I paid for all of my medical supplies, I used a gallon milk jug all the time, except when traveling. Cut a whole in the top, slide the tube through and wrap tape around the tuber so it wouldn't pull out. Used it both with condom cath and foley.
                "It is every man's obligation to put back into the world at least the equivalent of what he takes out of it. Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value." - Albert Einstein

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                  #9
                  Whatever size urine collector they will pay for- usually at least 2 liters-some connect the drainage tube to another device to empty but not directly to the foley. So you connected the extension tubing( of 18 inches) to the catheter end then put in milk jug or milk jug to bag empty spout?. Since the tubing and leg bag or larger volume drainage bag can be reused for quite a while with cleaning it seems that it wouldn't be that much of a cost since reused.
                  CWO
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Perhaps connecting two drainage bags together could be an option. In this example the bags connected together are leg bags, but might be adapted to two 2 L night drain bags.

                    https://www.instructables.com/Double-Leg-Bag/

                    NL

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