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Has anybody successfully installed a solid insert into a Schwalbe tire?

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  • Has anybody successfully installed a solid insert into a Schwalbe tire?

    If so, can you tell me the exact size and model of tire and insert that you used? My shop could not get the tire to seat on the solid inserts and I'm wondering if we had the wrong size inserts. I like their tires for the minimal rolling resistance and it's nice to not have to fiddle with air pressure every week.

    Thanks,

    Dan

  • #2
    Did they try Using talcum/baby powder? What was the issue?

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    • #3
      would john know he is all about that stuff

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      • #4
        The insert was just too big for the volume of the tire.

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        • #5
          Schwalbee marathon 559. LOTS of silicone spray, zip ties and a rubber hammer to beat the hell out of it to seat the bead. I'd never do it again. I'd go with a 540 gray standard wheel chair tire, or just a solid tire.

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          • #6
            If you're talking about the marathon, it seems the main selling point of the tire is it's puncture resistance. Why not go with a Shox (or whatever is good, haven't had solid tires in many years) that will probably last you longer at much less cost with much easier installation and likely very similar if not better performance (it'd be a shame to go through the hassle of getting a new marathon on their every six months or however long they're lasting you if it's your daily chair and dropping another $100 for the pleasure).

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            • #7
              Yeah the Marathon is a little pricey. I had been using the Right Runs mainly for their minimal rolling resistance. I've never used Shox solid tires. Maybe I'll give that a try.

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              • #8
                I just got an email from Sportaid reminding me that my most recent Marathon tire purchase is one year old this month and might need to be replaced. They aren't even close to being worn. There are even some "chicken strips" (little rubber tags left over from the molding process) still hanging off the sidewalls. They replaced Marathons put on in 2008 that had just cracked too much on the side walls for my comfort. Still had tread. They are well worth the price for the life I get out of them.

                The Shox 110psi version are pretty good. I used them for travel years ago. Biggest issue with them for me was that after they wear a bit they start acting like sponges. They soak up and deposit water if you ever run them through the wet stuff.
                "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Oddity View Post
                  The Shox 110psi version are pretty good. I used them for travel years ago. Biggest issue with them for me was that after they wear a bit they start acting like sponges. They soak up and deposit water if you ever run them through the wet stuff.
                  Thanks, you just helped me immensely! Living in New Orleans I'm rolling through water all the time so having sponges for wheels is a definite no go!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Oddity View Post
                    I just got an email from Sportaid reminding me that my most recent Marathon tire purchase is one year old this month and might need to be replaced. They aren't even close to being worn. There are even some "chicken strips" (little rubber tags left over from the molding process) still hanging off the sidewalls. They replaced Marathons put on in 2008 that had just cracked too much on the side walls for my comfort. Still had tread. They are well worth the price for the life I get out of them.

                    The Shox 110psi version are pretty good. I used them for travel years ago. Biggest issue with them for me was that after they wear a bit they start acting like sponges. They soak up and deposit water if you ever run them through the wet stuff.
                    Wow, that's really good life on the marathons. Mine desperately need to be replaced and I guess they're the original ones that came on my new chair about 10 months ago, but generally they don't last me six months. I probably put more mileage on my tires than the average user though. Prior to coronavirus I probably put in 5 or 6 miles at work on vinyl floors and then another couple miles on concrete afterwards. Also mine are my only wheels/tires, so they have to go literally everwhere I do. And I know I have a habit of skidding on one tire to make turns at the bottom of a hill, which probably doesn't help the longevity.

                    I still agree they're definitely worth the money, but idk if I'd feel they had the same value with solid inserts.

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                    • Oddity
                      Oddity commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Wow dude, yeah, that's several orders of magnitude more mileage than I put on tires every day. I probably do a mile a day on average, being retired and mostly at home. It's definitely about the mileage and the surfaces. 10 months seems good for your amount of usage and surfaces! I also use 2 chairs pretty consistently, so that cuts down mileage even more. My use case is quite minimal.

                  • #11
                    If you like minimal rolling resistance, you won't get that with solid inserts. They are heavy and slow. If you're using Marathon Plus tires, they are really tough to get flats with. When was the last time you actually had a flat tire?

                    Why would you fiddle with air pressure once a week? If you are losing that much pressure in a week, it's time to change out the tubes or in the least, valves. If you want minimal rolling resistance, go with a lighter high pressure tire like the Scwalbe Right Runs.

                    If you want less resistance and not around places with thorns, the high pressure Right Runs are ideal. If you want better puncture protection, go with Marathon Plus. I use the MP's on my handcycle after rebuilding the wheels to fit 559's. Have never had a flat where before I'd go thru10 tires a year cause of flats. I don't use them on my chair because the tread eats up my hands. I wheel with my palms wrapped around the top of the tire and handrim. Instead, I use the Right Runs on my chair and don't remember the last flat I got. I bought a small electric portable air pump at Lowes for like 40.00 years ago. I check tire pressure when I notice my brakes aren't holding like they should; perhaps every 2 months or so.

                    I tried inserts; they were too heavy and slow. Low pressure tires are slow. High pressure tires are fastest.

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                    • #12
                      I went from Marathons to Primo Sentinal. A lot cheaper and I've not had a flat problem with them. I live in florida and have sand burrs at my place.

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                      • #13
                        Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
                        If you like minimal rolling resistance, you won't get that with solid inserts. They are heavy and slow. If you're using Marathon Plus tires, they are really tough to get flats with. When was the last time you actually had a flat tire?

                        Why would you fiddle with air pressure once a week? If you are losing that much pressure in a week, it's time to change out the tubes or in the least, valves. If you want minimal rolling resistance, go with a lighter high pressure tire like the Scwalbe Right Runs.

                        If you want less resistance and not around places with thorns, the high pressure Right Runs are ideal. If you want better puncture protection, go with Marathon Plus. I use the MP's on my handcycle after rebuilding the wheels to fit 559's. Have never had a flat where before I'd go thru10 tires a year cause of flats. I don't use them on my chair because the tread eats up my hands. I wheel with my palms wrapped around the top of the tire and handrim. Instead, I use the Right Runs on my chair and don't remember the last flat I got. I bought a small electric portable air pump at Lowes for like 40.00 years ago. I check tire pressure when I notice my brakes aren't holding like they should; perhaps every 2 months or so.

                        I tried inserts; they were too heavy and slow. Low pressure tires are slow. High pressure tires are fastest.
                        Thanks for the input. I guess I'll stay with Right Runs and tubes. I have the same little electric air compressor. I have to stay on top of the air pressure in the tires because as I lose air pressure, my wheelchair will start to rock back and forth in the EZ-lock in my van which makes it a pain in the ass for driving!

                        Those Primo Sentinel tires look interesting - I may give them a try.

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