Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question about a commode cushion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question about a commode cushion

    Hi everyone,

    C5/6 here. I've decided to buy a Raz SP for bowel program (hopefully moving towards independence) and independent shower, but have a question I'd love to get some advice on. I've asked my OT, but she isn't familiar enough with the chair or with quads in general to be able to answer this.

    I'm going to get the visco-elastic foam cushion to help prevent pressure sores, but I'm unsure of where to get the cut out. My current Shower Buddy chair has a cut out in front, and my left leg twists into it everyday, which makes it really difficult to position myself in a useful way. I've also learned that I can't reach through the front very well, and therefore should probably use a side cut out. My question is: should I get the cut out on the right or left? My right leg stays in place because I have ossification in my hip pushes my thigh open and hardinto the cushion. My left leg seems to follow the right and therefore twists to the right across the cushion. Meanwhile, my right hand fingers are quite open and it's a bit weak in range of motion due to hardware left over from my accident. My left hand is a closed fist that holds tools very well and has quite good range of motion and wrist strength. So I'm thinking that I'd want the cutout on the left because it will accommodate my better hand for bowel program, and also may kind of let my left side fall in a little bit preventing twisting toward my right hip. Is that a dumb idea? I'd imagined that my right leg would be fairly stable sitting over the cutout, which might be a big advantage.

    Thanks for any insights and advice!
    Emmett
    Last edited by ejl10; 04-22-2020, 03:21 PM.
    C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

  • #2
    I'm T8, so my experience is clearly not fully applicable. Definitely sounds like you want the cutout on the left. I'm not quite sure what you mean by "let my left side fall in a little". Fall into the cutout? Do you just mean lean to the left?

    With tools it may be a bit easier, but I do digital stim and I've got to lean pretty far to get all the way up in there and wriggle my finger around. My cutout is on the right because I use my right hand, but I end up having to hold onto the toilet seat frame with my left hand to stabilize myself when I'm leaning over (abs and back muscles are pretty useless). It's worth thinking about how you're going to stabilize your trunk while you're leaning/twisting/falling to get in position to shove stuff up the old bum.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by funklab View Post
      I'm not quite sure what you mean by "let my left side fall in a little". Fall into the cutout? Do you just mean lean to the left?
      Yep, I mean fall into the cutout. My bum is really thinned out from atrophy, and the 18" wide seat is definitely fitted to someone much wider than me, which means the hole in the middle will almost certainly be oversized. My current chair uses the same width cushion, and the hole is so enormous that I pretty much just fall through on the left (probably in part due to the ossification on my right hip). I expect it to be similar on the Raz, but exacerbated by a cutout on the left side.

      Thanks for your perspective! And T8 doesn't make it inapplicable... All of our injuries are different, so another C5/6 perspective probably wouldn't be any more applicable to my case. I've definitely thought through the challenge of how I'm going to do this, even with a dil stick tool, but I've got to get some independence in this part of my routine, so I guess I'm just going to have to try try try and find a way, haha!

      For a little extra reading and context, I've always felt very much at the mercy of my PCAs, on whom I'm completely dependent for bowel program, and this Covid virus has convinced me that I need to find a way to be independent at all costs. This morning my PCA told me that 67 people in her public housing location have Covid. Despite the fact that there are probably 4,000 people at that location, it jarred me and I just thought "I have to find another way or this thing's going to get me!" More broadly, I've been thinking about this for the last year and, Covid or not, I want to be on my own schedule, and free of fears that somebody won't show up because of a snowstorm or something. It's hard to be so dependent on someone! Plus, it seems like every high-level quad on YouTube has figured this thing out, so why can't I? :-)
      C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

      Comment


      • #4
        You sound super motivated, I'm sure you'll be able to figure it out. IDK if the holes in the toilet seats are really that big. I mean no matter how fat you are, it doesn't make your butthole any bigger, and that's all you really need access to. My toilet seat is about 16 x 16. I'm skinny as well and sit in a 13" wide chair. There's no way I could make myself feel as if I was "falling into" the center hole. There's just enough room to give access. If I were to position myself in a way that one ischium was up on the side of the cushion (the only way I can picture falling "into" the toilet seat) then I would no longer have access to the area of interest as it would be pressed directly up against the inside of the circular cutout... which sounds like a recipe for a horrific mess.

        Comment


        • #5
          You might take a look at the basic NuProdix (sp?) basic seat, designed by a quadriplegic motorcycle racer.
          First, the "C" shaped cushion easily dismounts and can be installed N, E, S, W.
          Secondly, it is excellent race-car (aerospace) engineering, yielding a great combination of fully functional for our needs design, simplistic minimalistic design using materials that will last a ifetime. (The only wear item, the cushion, is replaceable from NuProdix.)
          Third: disassembles in 5 minutes to it's component parts, can be bagged and travelled with.
          A little expensive, but a lifetime investment that will give satisfying use.

          I used mine 15 years before getting a colostomy in 2012 and gave it to a high function quad who's still riding it
          69yo male T12 complete since 1995
          NW NJ

          Comment


          • #6
            See if one of these might work. They're flexible memory foam so comfortable and pliable and you could adjust to prevent your leg from falling in. They're designed for our GO-Anywhere Commode 'n Shower Chairs but may work on your SB.

            Rick
            Rick Goldstein
            GO! Mobility Solutions
            facebook.com/goes.anywhere

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pfcs49 View Post
              You might take a look at the basic NuProdix (sp?) basic seat, designed by a quadriplegic motorcycle racer.
              Thanks thanks for the tip! I didn't realize it was designed by a quad. I've looked at NuProdx, and it seems to be really well made. The only concern I had was with the frame extending the full way around the seating area, the getting in the way of reaching underneath for bowel program. That's why I settled on the Raz - there's no frame or anything else underneath the cut out and therefore it's very easy to reach through. but I have to admit, I like the idea of being able to use one cushion in multiple positions, just in case we don't get it right on the first guess!
              C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by goldnucs View Post
                See if one of these might work. They're flexible memory foam so comfortable and pliable and you could adjust to prevent your leg from falling in. They're designed for our GO-Anywhere Commode 'n Shower Chairs but may work on your SB.

                Rick
                Thanks for the idea, Rick. I hadn't thought about using a cushion from another brand. I liked the GO Anywhere chair when you brought it to the Empower expo at Stony Brook last summer, though I admit that at the time I was still many months away from being ready for this kind of chair. One thing that concerns me is whether or not the cushion is sufficient for someone highly prone to skin breakdown, as I remember it being a little on the hard side. I know that you make a thicker cushion, too, and would like to check it out at some point. The Raz won't travel very well, so I'd imagine someday soon I'll need to sort out an alternative for when I'm away from home. As with the NuProdx chair, I wish the frame were completely removed underneath the cushion cut out, but as a compromise I like the way that the GO is indented.
                C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ejl10 View Post

                  Thanks for the idea, Rick. I hadn't thought about using a cushion from another brand. I liked the GO Anywhere chair when you brought it to the Empower expo at Stony Brook last summer, though I admit that at the time I was still many months away from being ready for this kind of chair. One thing that concerns me is whether or not the cushion is sufficient for someone highly prone to skin breakdown, as I remember it being a little on the hard side. I know that you make a thicker cushion, too, and would like to check it out at some point. The Raz won't travel very well, so I'd imagine someday soon I'll need to sort out an alternative for when I'm away from home. As with the NuProdx chair, I wish the frame were completely removed underneath the cushion cut out, but as a compromise I like the way that the GO is indented.
                  As a c5-6 complete for 42 years, I've always been super-vigilant when it comes to my skin. This is the primary reason that I designed our chairs with inexpensive, easy-to-replace memory foam cushions. With respect to their feasibility as it concerns skin protection, I can tell you from my own (15 year) experience that it's been flawless; never had an issue, even with long sitting times. Many of our customers have related similar experience. The 1-5/8" (double-thick) cushion, of course, provides more protection than the standard cushion, well worth the $45 cost to upgrade.
                  Rick Goldstein
                  GO! Mobility Solutions
                  facebook.com/goes.anywhere

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Rick, I'm looking forward to checking out your chairs soon.
                    Last edited by ejl10; 05-07-2020, 09:49 PM.
                    C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X