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SureHands body support or sling?

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    #16
    For the average person to hang in either the sling or the body support and raise up vertically to the max so the feet clear the bed just isn't going to happen. Especially in a standard 7 foot ceiling. That is why I think very few people use the Surehands system completely independently.

    In my experience, and I am 5'10", using either the sling or body support required someone else to lift up my lower legs by the ankle to clear the bed.

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      #17
      im 6'2 and use my arjo independently and clear my bed with my feet. but i use this sling, super easy too. https://www.arjo.com/int/products/sa...let-sling-low/
      Bike-on.com rep
      John@bike-on.com
      c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
      sponsored handcycle racer

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        #18
        I really think this surehands is amazing. I am really interested in purchasing one. I really would like to hear from someone that uses the ceiling hand one without assistants.
        I am a c7 with function in one hand so I think I might be able to operate by myself.
        My concerns are. How dependable and safe is it. I don't want to be breaking down on me often. And the cost.

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          #19
          Originally posted by TheRainman View Post
          I really think this surehands is amazing. I am really interested in purchasing one. I really would like to hear from someone that uses the ceiling hand one without assistants.
          I am a c7 with function in one hand so I think I might be able to operate by myself.
          My concerns are. How dependable and safe is it. I don't want to be breaking down on me often. And the cost.
          Very safe and dependable. I have two of them one is about 15 years old and the other is 4 years old. I had to change the batteries a few times on the 15 year old one.

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            #20
            Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
            Very safe and dependable. I have two of them one is about 15 years old and the other is 4 years old. I had to change the batteries a few times on the 15 year old one.
            Thank you for your reply, do you know about cost? And requirement for height of ceiling.

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              #21
              Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
              Definitely need high enough ceilings. Moved into an apartment and had everything ready to go. Unfortunately I was unable to get out of my wheelchair and into bed using the body support because the ceiling was not high enough. I switched to a sling and it works perfect.
              Hi, curious what specific lift setup you have in an apartment?

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                #22
                Originally posted by landrover View Post
                Hi, curious what specific lift setup you have in an apartment?
                It's a Surehands Track-to-Track Motor https://www.surehands.com/products/t...o-track-motor/ It is attached to two walls instead of the ceiling. I use a sling with it.
                Attached Files

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                  #23
                  My Surehands was installed in 2012 and I have never had a down day. I also don't mess around and pay for an annual service call. Some would consider that a waste of money but for something as important as a lifting device I would think it would be money well spent. They clean it out, test the batteries, clean the tracks, buff up the charging pins so good contact is maintained, check the strap for anywhere, check the roller, tighten any ceiling bolts, tighten any track fasteners, etc.

                  My installer said most people don't call for annual service until it's too late.

                  I stand corrected for leg clearance. When my hoist is at the uppermost position, my legs do clear the bed, though not by much. I do not use it alone, but a trickier problem is landing in the bed and then having to push one's legs out straight, as the hoist lands you with your knees up and heels in close.

                  Using the Surehands body brace solo will require you to keep inward pressure with your upper arms to keep the shoulder supports correctly positioned while at the same time (if a quad) holding the remote in one hand while pushing the appropriate button with the other. It will be very important to keep the lanyard around one's neck because if you drop the remote while you are hoisted you are screwed.

                  I have a dressing/workout table in my bedroom and there are times when I would be on the table and will be going to bed afterwards previously required to transfers, into the chair, rolling 5 feet to the bed, and then into bed.

                  My track layout goes from the table to the bed so I can now ride the lift back and forth and eliminating those unnecessary transfers.

                  Plan your layout carefully, especially where you want to be dropped into bed. Getting to bed where you like to be, typically centered, and then drop a plumb line from the ceiling to where it meets the center of your pelvis. Put a dot on the ceiling where that plumb line meets the ceiling that is where you need your track to go.

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                    #24
                    For those lift users who are dependent upon others to use/operate the lift, what led you to choose a ceiling track system rather than a portable lift?

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by landrover View Post
                      For those lift users who are dependent upon others to use/operate the lift, what led you to choose a ceiling track system rather than a portable lift?
                      For my parents, it was much better than trying to find a place to store a mobile floor lift, and they also wanted to continue to use carpet in the bedroom and family room. It can be difficult if not unsafe to try to use a floor-based lift on carpet, especially if padded.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                        For my parents, it was much better than trying to find a place to store a mobile floor lift, and they also wanted to continue to use carpet in the bedroom and family room. It can be difficult if not unsafe to try to use a floor-based lift on carpet, especially if padded.

                        (KLD)
                        Makes sense. My bedroom in my apartment is carpeted. I have a thick vinyl mat (similar to ones used with desk chairs, but thicker) that overlays the carpet where the lift travels.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by landrover View Post
                          For those lift users who are dependent upon others to use/operate the lift, what led you to choose a ceiling track system rather than a portable lift?
                          Not enough room in my apartment bedroom plus carpet. Ceiling lift is always out of the way.

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                            #28
                            Thanks for all the replies. I am still curious of cost.

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                              #29
                              If your needs are always fixed in the same location then a ceiling track is an option. But if you need it in multiple places, such as getting lowered into a tub or on the toilet then probably less so. Yes they can run tracks all over your house if need be, but once you go through door frames it is a lot more complicated and probably expensive.

                              The ceiling track, if one can afford it, really keeps the floor clutter down, especially if one has multiple chairs and other crap in one's bedroom.

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                                #30
                                If you are not operating it on your own, you can purchase a ceiling track lift (CTL) motor that you can move from room to room, and have only a shorter piece of track installed in those other locations. There are a couple different motors that can be moved like this; my mother used the Barrier Free PC-2, and my dad modified her SureHands frame to use with it.

                                https://www.barrierfreelifts.com/pc-2-homecare/

                                Operating a CTL on your own also requires that you have a motor that not only raises/lowers you, but has a lateral motor feature to move you along the track. This adds significantly to the expense. If you are going to be moved by a caregiver, then the less expensive systems that have your caregiver slide you laterally along the track can save a lot of money.

                                (KLD)
                                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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