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    Caster Locks

    I have Quickie GPV, been using a GPV for many years and very happy with it. I've recently started thinking about adding some type of front caster brake/lock for more stability during transfers. Quickie does have a front pin lock assemble for the GPV but before I commit to this I was curious if anyone has come up with any alternative methods for stabilizing the front casters.

    Never know till ya ask,

    Thanks

    #2
    I have the Quickie caster lock. Not sure if I have a "GPV", it's a standard Quickie manual. It definitely helps with transfers! That and a tapered footrest.

    The only disadvantage is that the wheels have to be aligned just so; you have to verify the caster lock is engaged. Also my caster locks only last a couple of years, but that is probably because I shower in the chair and get soap over everything. Still, I find the caster locks very helpful.

    Comment


      #3
      Look at this page. Ki seems to be making them.
      https://www.quickie-wheelchairs.com/...ster-pin-locks
      I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

      Comment


        #4
        Wheel lock users be aware!

        Those Quickie caster locks are very dangerous. My first 'chair out of hospital was a Quickie with caster locks. I have a deck and ramp on my house at the time. It was deck, ramp decline, flat, ramp decline then driveway.

        One day I was going down my ramp by gravity and that caster lock decided to engage in the slot on my left side causing my 'chair to do a quick left turn into the hand railing catapulting me up and over the railing. My rear tires lifted about 8 inches from the decline and I grabbed the hand railing from going over. It came on unexpectedly. After that I called my dad to take off my front casters and removed the round ring and pin assembly.

        I am not sure where you are transferring to but a little wedge behind the casters will prevent your 'chair from rolling away. Another option if you are transferring to bed a small bungee cord wrapped around the front vertical post of the frame and wrapped around the handle of the mattress.

        But user be aware!

        Ti
        "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by titanium4motion View Post
          Those Quickie caster locks are very dangerous. My first 'chair out of hospital was a Quickie with caster locks. I have a deck and ramp on my house at the time. It was deck, ramp decline, flat, ramp decline then driveway.

          One day I was going down my ramp by gravity and that caster lock decided to engage in the slot on my left side causing my 'chair to do a quick left turn into the hand railing catapulting me up and over the railing. My rear tires lifted about 8 inches from the decline and I grabbed the hand railing from going over. It came on unexpectedly. After that I called my dad to take off my front casters and removed the round ring and pin assembly.

          I am not sure where you are transferring to but a little wedge behind the casters will prevent your 'chair from rolling away. Another option if you are transferring to bed a small bungee cord wrapped around the front vertical post of the frame and wrapped around the handle of the mattress.

          But user be aware!

          Ti
          I would have taken those off too. Did they look exactly like Ki's? It looks like those (Ki's) you have to push down to lock.
          Last edited by nonoise; 23 Jul 2019, 11:13 PM.
          I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

          Comment


            #6
            Glad to hear the Quickie lock works well for you. I saw the Ki lock when I was searching the web. It looks very simular to the Quickie design. I don't think you push it down, looks like a spring pops it down when the pin is rotated. Thanks for the tip about the lock engaging by itself.

            Thanks for the replies.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
              Glad to hear the Quickie lock works well for you. I saw the Ki lock when I was searching the web. It looks very simular to the Quickie design. I don't think you push it down, looks like a spring pops it down when the pin is rotated. Thanks for the tip about the lock engaging by itself.

              Thanks for the replies.

              This is the Quickie I found just now: https://www.quickie-wheelchairs.com/...ster-pin-locks
              It also appears to me to be a push down against a spring to lock. But with either of these I can see how the spring could get weak, broken due to rust. I can not tell if there is a safe harbor for the lever so that it will not accidentally rotate from it's non locked position. These are just things to think about. I too use a GPV that slips on me when I transfer to my stair elevator.
              I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

              Comment


                #8
                I have never heard of caster locks. Is this mainly if you have scissor locks on your rear wheels that can slip, as opposed to hub locks? Anytime my caster moved during a transfer (I have D's locks) it was because it was lifted off the ground slightly, which a caster lock wouldn't help with. When would you need this?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                  Look at this page. Ki seems to be making them.
                  https://www.quickie-wheelchairs.com/...ster-pin-locks
                  These were the caster locks on my Quickie. As I remember they are spring loaded and that is why when I was picket fencing down the ramp it engaged sending me into my hand railing.

                  Now my shower chair has a very nice set of locking casters. The shower chair is a Raz-SP. Search their web site. They are not very attractive but they do work very well.

                  Ti
                  "We must overcome difficulties rather than being overcome by difficulties."

                  Comment


                  • ejl10
                    ejl10 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Accidentally, commented instead of quoting
                    Last edited by ejl10; 21 Jul 2020, 11:39 AM.

                  #10
                  I had the caster locks on my Quickie for awhile. They were a little bit of a PITA to use as noted in some of the other posts plus they are just one more thing you have to tend to during maintenance. I haven't used them in years and just stay in the habit of making sure I back up a little in my chair to get the casters turned so that the trailing link is facing forward before transferring. That little bit of stability along with locked brakes is about all you need for safe transfers.

                  Comment


                    #11
                    Originally posted by Brad09 View Post
                    I have never heard of caster locks. Is this mainly if you have scissor locks on your rear wheels that can slip, as opposed to hub locks? Anytime my caster moved during a transfer (I have D's locks) it was because it was lifted off the ground slightly, which a caster lock wouldn't help with. When would you need this?
                    They don't keep the caster from turning, they lock the caster in a straight position and keep the front of the chair from moving side to side.

                    Comment


                      #12
                      Originally posted by Sit-N-Fly View Post
                      I had the caster locks on my Quickie for awhile. They were a little bit of a PITA to use as noted in some of the other posts plus they are just one more thing you have to tend to during maintenance. I haven't used them in years and just stay in the habit of making sure I back up a little in my chair to get the casters turned so that the trailing link is facing forward before transferring. That little bit of stability along with locked brakes is about all you need for safe transfers.
                      I'll give it a try and see if rotating the casters forward helps stability.

                      It's funny, for forty years I never even had brakes on my chair. But after a certain age you start looking for every little trick in the book so you don't end up on the floor.

                      Comment


                        #13
                        Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                        It's funny, for forty years I never even had brakes on my chair. But after a certain age you start looking for every little trick in the book so you don't end up on the floor.
                        Ain't that the truth?.....

                        Comment


                          #14
                          Originally posted by titanium4motion View Post
                          Now my shower chair has a very nice set of locking casters. The shower chair is a Raz-SP. Search their web site. They are not very attractive but they do work very well.
                          Do you just have the standard foot actuated locks on your Raz casters, or did you get the user activated ones here? https://razdesigninc.com/index.php/2...-caster-locks/

                          I'm trying to decide if those are actually useful, or if they're just an expensive add-on. Seems like they would only work if the front casters we're facing forward, which might not always be ideal and be a bit of a pain in the butt when trying to position the chair, but having more and easier stability on those front casters could go a long way!
                          C5/6 complete (maybe) circa June 2018

                          Comment


                            #15
                            Originally posted by ejl10 View Post

                            Do you just have the standard foot actuated locks on your Raz casters, or did you get the user activated ones here? https://razdesigninc.com/index.php/2...-caster-locks/

                            I'm trying to decide if those are actually useful, or if they're just an expensive add-on. Seems like they would only work if the front casters we're facing forward, which might not always be ideal and be a bit of a pain in the butt when trying to position the chair, but having more and easier stability on those front casters could go a long way!
                            We had Raz Design commodes/shower chairs where I worked prior to retirement. We found that not having them made transfers into the commode from bed, on a lino floor, often allowed the chair to slide away. We no longer had that problem after getting the caster locks. If you transfer on/off on carpet, this may not be a problem, so the need for them will vary according to the environment in which you are using the chair.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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