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    Inflatable cushion

    Because of my injury (C5/6) and age (66) I'm starting to have real problems transferring from the bed to my chair, especially in the morning, I have more strength later in the day. Getting in is still ok because it's a little down hill and transferring down hill is always easier.

    My thought was to put an inflatable cushion in between the mattress and box spring, position right below where I sit on the edge of the bed when I'm getting ready to transfer. Mangar makes something that looks like it might work but at $500 it's more than I want to spend. I'm not sure it will even solve my problem. https://www.healthproductsforyou.com...caAszMEALw_wcB

    I really only need 2-3 inches of lift to be level. I should be able to rig something up cheaper. There are lots of inflatable cushions but the trick is I want a power air pump permanently attached to the cushion so I can just flick a switch or press a button. I could use a portable air pump but I would need the cushion to have a long extension on the filling tube so I could easily grab it and attach it to the air pump. I can't be bending down with the pump and trying to attach it to the filling plug. I just don't bend, got to much spasticity.

    If anyone has done something like this or has any suggestions, I appreciate hearing from you.

    #2
    wes4dbt - Would it be practical in your case to permanently alter the height of your bed so that bed-to-chair and chair-to-bed transfers do not involve a height difference?

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      #3
      Originally posted by WC_Sage View Post
      wes4dbt - Would it be practical in your case to permanently alter the height of your bed so that bed-to-chair and chair-to-bed transfers do not involve a height difference?
      Thought about it. Would make getting out of bed easier but would make getting in bed more difficult. The bed is actually even with my chair but when I sit on the edge it sinks 2-3 inched. I know I'm asking a lot because basically I want the transfer to be downhill both ways. I know I'm coming to a point in my life where I'm going to need some type of lifting system, (been looking at ceiling lifts but the cost OUCH). It's just I've been independent for 42+ yrs post injury years and I'm not ready to give in just yet. I ordered an air cushion from Amazon (actually a couple different ones) going to stick it between the box frame and mattress, sit on the edge of the bed and inflate it. This is just a proof of concept test. If it makes transferring easier I'll be willing to spend some money and fine tune to process. If I can get one more year of independence then I'll consider it a win, hell even six months.

      Thanks for the reply.

      Comment


        #4
        A hospital bed frame would be height adjustable. I think you can find them fairly cheap, especially used. IMO that would be a great solution.

        My transfers out of bed have gotten more difficult. I've found that folding a foam pillow in half and using it under my hand makes a big difference.
        There's always sliding boards too.
        69yo male T12 complete since 1995
        NW NJ

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          #5
          Problem with hospital beds is that they're hospital beds.

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            #6
            My transfers out of bed have gotten more difficult. I've found that folding a foam pillow in half and using it under my hand makes a big difference.
            I've thought about trying something like like. Does the extra height help you get more lift? My problem would be that the hand that is on the bed is basically a fist, can't open it up but still might be able to come up with some. thanks.

            Problem with hospital beds is that they're hospital beds.
            I've looked at queen size beds that have adjustable height and they're pricey, plus most of them don't go low enough. I believe my bed is only 18 or 19 inches from top of mattress to the floor. Thanks

            A sliding board doesn't work. I've got no real gap, my chair is up against my bed, there's just a height difference and a sliding board would just be pointing up at a 45 degree angle. At least all the ones I've seen.

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              #7
              A sliding board doesn't work. I've got no real gap, my chair is up against my bed, there's just a height difference and a sliding board would just be pointing up at a 45 degree angle. At least all the ones I've seen.

              Move the chair and use a 3' board, however, in my case, I sleep naked so sliding is a problem. There are boards that have a little "saddle" that rolls in a track.

              Re "hospital beds": you only need a bed that raises and lowers. If it still is too high, investigate the possibility of just sawing off some of the legs.
              69yo male T12 complete since 1995
              NW NJ

              Comment


                #8
                When looking for a new mattress, I stumbled upon a foam mattress that the foam on sides was of a stiffer material (designed for better transfers). It has multi density foams where you lay.
                I didn't buy it but almost did. https://www.vitalitymedical.com/span...tress-max.html
                Not sure it will help you, just a thought.

                Mattress side/edge is where I've had my fall issues.
                Attack life, it's going to kill you anyway
                Steve Mcqueen (Mr Cool)

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by August West View Post
                  Problem with hospital beds is that they're hospital beds.
                  Yes, but on the positive side they are not only height adjustable, they incline in both direction, under the knee can be elevated to take load off the lumber region and lastly, the head end can be incline adjust from horizontal to 90 degrees.

                  I cannot sleep well in a conventional bed now and for a good sleep I prefer my hospital bed.
                  There is a drawback to the head end incline adjust feature. When the power fails you are stuck if you don't have battery back-up.

                  Three nights ago I had the pleasure of sleeping in the upright position when the power failed at midnight.
                  It was bliss until 5.30 am when the power was reinstated.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ’m sorry I’m not sure I understand.

                    If you want a power height adjustable base for your current bed, I have seen those and will look again. If you find it please let me know because that is what I need. You set up said inflatable...

                    ** the mattress genie might work if you lay it longways under the mattress, but very very loud
                    https://www.rehabmart.com/product/ma...nie-31832.html

                    but maybe something like this (notice the alternatives along the side of the page
                    https://www.rehabmart.com/product/ra...ion-46534.html

                    Admit I don’t understand this one at all
                    https://www.rehabmart.com/product/pr...ace-46990.html

                    There also are a number of adjustable treatment tables.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I just use a small piece of plywood (12x12) with a pillow on top to help me transfer. I don't sit on the wood, just use it under my hand to lift me up higher.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by slow_runner View Post
                        Yes, but on the positive side they are not only height adjustable, they incline in both direction, under the knee can be elevated to take load off the lumber region and lastly, the head end can be incline adjust from horizontal to 90 degrees.

                        I cannot sleep well in a conventional bed now and for a good sleep I prefer my hospital bed.
                        There is a drawback to the head end incline adjust feature. When the power fails you are stuck if you don't have battery back-up.

                        Three nights ago I had the pleasure of sleeping in the upright position when the power failed at midnight.
                        It was bliss until 5.30 am when the power was reinstated.
                        They have very inexpensive battery backups (UPS), $40.

                        My bed has the head and feet incline feature but not height.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by baldfatdad View Post
                          I just use a small piece of plywood (12x12) with a pillow on top to help me transfer. I don't sit on the wood, just use it under my hand to lift me up higher.
                          I can see how that would be helpful. The problem I see is that it takes me basically three lifts (shoulder compressions) to get on the chair. My bed hand is positioned right next to my thigh, after the first lift I reposition my hands, the hand on the bed ends up moving to where my butt use to be. So it seems I would only get one push with my hand on the board. I use to transfer in one lift from bed to chair but those days are gone. I really should try something like the board/cushion idea, maybe I'd get farther onto the chair with my first lift. Did you glue the cushion to the board or do you just lay it on top?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Would you consider re-thinking the power bed ("hospital bed") idea? Your shoulders are getting a major workout with some of the methods suggested for transferring. I'm someone who was paralyzed 70 yrs ago, but just in last 10 years had to go with a power bed. We have a back-up battery for it. If you are healthy and can use your shoulders I'd consider this as it will help you for years ahead.
                            It will allow you to do "gravity transfers" as you have described. We use transfer boards and make them extra slippery with frequent Pledge use, and place a piece of cloth when transferring.
                            Medicare covers a portion of this type of cost. Hopefully you will discuss with your doctor in case you need to go this route and get a prescription.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                              I can see how that would be helpful. The problem I see is that it takes me basically three lifts (shoulder compressions) to get on the chair. My bed hand is positioned right next to my thigh, after the first lift I reposition my hands, the hand on the bed ends up moving to where my butt use to be. So it seems I would only get one push with my hand on the board. I use to transfer in one lift from bed to chair but those days are gone. I really should try something like the board/cushion idea, maybe I'd get farther onto the chair with my first lift. Did you glue the cushion to the board or do you just lay it on top?
                              Originally I put the pillow on top. Then I (actually my girl friend the crafty one) got fancy. Yoga mat from wally world, cut to size and piled up, even glued them together with 3M spray glue and stapled a cover over it. Fancy huh? Now I got a new mattress with much stiffer sides, so I don't need the board. I'm 72 and must be lucky. I do push ups every morning and can transfer pretty well.

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