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Setting Toe-in / Toe-out on a Shadow handcycle??

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    #16
    Hey Patrick, do the mach2 and onward Quickies have inserts that allow Toe adjust?

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      #17
      The toe adjust is done by using a square and lining it up so no space between square edge and flat edge of the axle sleeve SR. Wheel tracking and Toe in/out are the same thing as far as i know. Wheel tracking is probably the term your side of the world calls
      what we use as Toe in/out. Yes, I think there are. I rarely used an upright but set up quite a few for others. Jim Martinson, original owner of Shadow, was a good friend of mine. He sold to Quickie. I thik there was a Quickie Shadow upright that used a camber bar. Been so long, the brain cells are well...not what they used to be. I was always in a recumbent Top End or Freedom Ryder. The lean steer Freddom Ryder is a blast to ride especially leaning into a turn at high speeds.

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        #18
        Toe-in or out down this way Patrick. As I understand the term, tracking is the behaviour; still, we know what we are speaking of aye.
        I am familiar with the method to adjust the TiLite using the camber tube with inserts and achieving a Toe that enables the most stable steering. When I have set them up I use a small engineers level (very accurate) with bubbles in both planes referenced to the flats you spoke of. If the chair is on a level surface it is easier for me than using large rafter squares.
        With reference to the possibility of a Quickie Shadow upright that used a camber bar, that would be difficult given that the rear axle is splayed to achieve camber and fully welded to the frame spine.
        If the threaded axle sleeves were made to achieve/adjust Toe - and referenced to a datum on the axle tube, it would be a relatively easy set-up to achieve. Good enough for its purpose, I think.
        As it is, in my instance, the Toe is pretty well spot on and testament to the accuracy of the jigging and welding in creating this frame.
        IMO Jim Martinson made a bloody good unit in the Shadow.
        It's easy for me to access. It has a strong Chrome Moly frame, nice welding, has good quality components, and accurate assembly.
        Also, I think that the Shadow load rating is on the conservative side while the Top End is not
        My recollection of the Top End I tested out was that the frame was lumpy mig welded, no TIG in sight, ugh!. Maybe made in China?
        I am digressing...
        Am I sounding like the Shadow hand-cycle evangelist??
        Last edited by slow_runner; 30 Jun 2019, 6:55 PM.

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          #19
          The toe is really spot on SR. THe only way you could improve it would be with threaded axels. I don't think they'd make much difference on an upright. Would be cool though. Is this a Quickie Shadow or a Shadow? The early one were put together well for sure.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
            The toe is really spot on SR. THe only way you could improve it would be with threaded axels. I don't think they'd make much difference on an upright. Would be cool though. Is this a Quickie Shadow or a Shadow? The early one were put together well for sure.
            It says "SHADOW by Quickie" on the down-tube Patrick.
            The crappy upholstery has a sewn on identity showing the same
            " SHADOW by Quickie "
            Manufactured Jan 29, 1996.
            Is that an early Jim Martinson unit that might qualify as one of the better built units?
            Attached Files

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              #21
              I did some reading Patrick. According to this article Sunrise purchased Magic in Motion ( and Shadow athletic equipment ) in 1992.

              http://www.fundinguniverse.com/compa...l-inc-history/

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                #22
                It's an early Quickie SR. Jim was still involved with Quickie after he sold the business to them. I think he left shortly after. Boy that is an old model with the seat adjustment. Great sturdy workhorses. I remember the spring compensators on my Top Ends. I think they still use springs on the entry level uprights. Never rode an upright except to check it out after working on one.

                Here's a photo of an early build we did after some modifications. Handcycles, except for a Jansen, weren't on the radar at all. I took it to a a few State and national w/c games and most poo pooed it because it was gear driven. The leg troughs are rain gutters. It's first conception it had three brakes. Kept breaking brake cables so changed over to a Sturmey Archer with triple chainrings. Frame was all hand brazed. The seat was a plastic formed kitchen chair. Still have it and will donate to a bike museum or something later on.
                Attached Files

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                  #23
                  I just re read the early Quickie Shadow thread.
                  I think we are having our own Groundhog day sequel Patrick


                  That's fine though 'cause Jim Martinson should be one who is mentioned more often.
                  During my reading there is more I learn about the people who forged an easier better path for those in the disability club.
                  Like this man, Ludwig Guttmann.
                  I wont say more about him but will allow those who may not be aware of him to investigate further. He was massive.
                  Last edited by slow_runner; 1 Jul 2019, 3:24 PM.

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                    #24
                    Doc Guttman Started the Stoke Mandeville Games back in the day. I think it was the first international Games if I remember right. It was surely different back then. E&J or Stainless wheelchairs weighed 52 lbs. and 56 if using basketball wheels with the metal sleeves that went thru the caster housings. They were considered the light weight sports chairs of the day. First camber was from our team (Canadian) using a small piece of metal with two holes at the cross braces. It caused the upholstery to sag and when folding the chaiir the downtubes on the front of the frame would slide out causing the whole chair to fall apart. Was really something trying to find the parts that fell on the ground in the dark. Ahh the good old days.

                    I think we are having a groundhog day there SR. In any case sure brings back memories of the old sports days before hand cycles, curb cuts and light weight chairs.

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