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Quickie Shadow handcycle

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  • #16
    Good to hear it's not too bad. The rear wheels are push button and not bolt on if I remember right. If so, they need just a little play so the axle can seat properly. Yep 9o is right. It's really important the toe-in/out is aligned right. Shouldn't be more than 1/4" difference in width between the front and back of the rear wheels. If there are flat edges on the end of the axle, they should be 90o to the ground. I used a square for that. If it doesn't, you'll have to measure the width distance at half way up the wheels. it'd be nice having some one sitting in it or weight on the seat as that'll give a better measurement if there need to be play in the wheel. Just a few minor adjustments will make a big dufference.

    When you go to change tires, try to get a higher pressure tire than the Kendra. A higher pressure tire on hard surface is much more efficient. If mainly riding hard surfaces a thinner tire would be more efficient. Great the mountain drive is working okay. You're going to find you won't be using it that much. Like DJ said, he put a larger chainring on his to compensate for his added strength. He's the man for uprights with thousands of miles in the saddle.

    For fit, if possible adjust the cranks so there is a slight bend in the elbows and not leaning forward when cranks are at 9 O'clock and at 3 O'clock try for a 90o bend or less with the back straight and feeling a squeeze between the Rhomboids. At your level, the lower you can get the cranks, the more you'll work your lower core. With that type of handcycle adjustments are not like they are now but you should get pretty close. If you have to rock back and forth when riding, you're too far back. If your shoulders are raising up and down to a large degree, you're sitting too low.

    Here's a photo of my handbuilt bike we built '77. Used rain gutter pvc for leg troughs and a plastic kitchen seat for the seat. It was a 27 speed at first with cable brakes. I kept breaking the cables so went to a 5 speed Strumey with drum brake. The frame was all hand brazed. I still have it. Couldn't figure out how to make the photo smaller.

    I'm excited for you. I'm getting to other end of the spectrum for my handcycling. With the power assist drives and newer designs, I'd like to make it to 50 years.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by Patrick Madsen; 05-13-2019, 02:48 AM.

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    • #17
      Technology has come a long way since the 80s Patrick. That looks to be innovative application and thought in that early machine of yours. That you still have it speaks volumes; good onya, I like that !
      I will be paying close attention and taking heed of the advice that has been forthcoming, thanks. We are never too old not to digest good advice from the experienced and knowledgeable; right?

      More images. Poor light but you get the gist.
      I moved the seat back support to the rear of the base then climbed aboard. The seat does need widening and will be sorted in the near futureAn ungainly exercise but successful. All over the backyard on dusk under fading light- big smiles. Man, what a buzz this lark is going to be.
      Our dog thought that it was time to play also; he was almost as excited as I was.
      .pigs in muck indeed!
      Attached Files
      Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019, 03:08 AM.

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      • #18
        It looks really good SR. We just used a wider piece of plywood on the seat. Also a better base with no sagging. You may want the foot rests at a bit of an angle and put some straps on to hold the feet on. There should be some holes in the rear of the footrest. They had a bolt on each side with a strap to hold the heel from sliding off. You'll figure it out.

        It's in much better shape than I anticipated. Yep, you're going to have a lot of fun on it. Brought back memories of my dogs running with me before the back roads got developed. Enjoy

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        • #19
          We just used a wider piece of plywood on the seat
          On your Quickie handcycle ?
          Memory foam is the other affordable butt material to use?

          I can lay my hands on some posts and straps Patrick. Yes, there are a few adjustments to be made to make it my own.
          Although it is an oldie it doesn't appear that this design changed much in its forms, mach 2 and 3. Maybe just small refinements and improved components??
          Does anyone know when this form of handcycle end for Quickie, in the early 2000's or so??

          P.S If it can be done, I am hoping that the moderator/s can change the thread title to reflect what has become the discussion subject
          Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019, 05:14 AM.

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          • #20
            Actually with the close up pics the condition of the gears and chainring look good as far as wear I would check the chain and see what wear it had with a tool you have some miles left in the gears and chainring though.
            Last edited by djrolling; 05-13-2019, 09:15 AM.

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            • #21
              This thread gets me psyched! Good luck with the restore. I have all the old parts off mine if you want them.

              Here's my Shadow I love it. I modified t with a 9 speed disc brake front wheel and 3 ring mountain bike cranks. Used an extra wide downhill bottom bracket with proper spacers so the cranks are centered on the trike rather then being slightly off to the left due to the coaster brake mechanism. Avid mechanical disc brakes and lever make stopping super easy.
              Attached Files
              Last edited by smity50; 05-13-2019, 12:06 PM.

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              • #22
                I never had a Quickie SR. Just repaired and rebuilt them for others. The plywood was to make the wider cushion sit flat. Was just a 1/4" or appleboard. We just slid it into the bottom of the cushion.

                Nice upgrades Smity!

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by smity50 View Post
                  Here's my Shadow I love it. I modified t with a 9 speed disc brake front wheel and 3 ring mountain bike cranks. Used an extra wide downhill bottom bracket with proper spacers so the cranks are centered on the trike rather then being slightly off to the left due to the coaster brake mechanism. Avid mechanical disc brakes and lever make stopping super easy.
                  Hello Smity; welcome to the conversation.
                  Man, I like what I see!
                  Congratulations on a sharp looking Shadow. That has got to be an inspiring example for those with 'tired' (?) older models.
                  The bicycle (or trike), despite all the techno is still a bicycle that performs its function well and that is just grand.
                  We owe it all to that person who invented the wheel.

                  Thank you for your offer too Smity; appreciated.
                  Can you contact me via PM in my profile? Thanks
                  Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019, 05:23 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Hi DJ.
                    Following on from your previous observation on the chain and drives, I checked out chain gauges. Go/no go work well enough as plug gauges so I think that a simple go/no go gauge will do me.
                    How do we check the drive chainwheels, with a gauge or experience?
                    Originally posted by djrolling View Post
                    Actually with the close up pics the condition of the gears and chainring look good as far as wear I would check the chain and see what wear it had with a tool you have some miles left in the gears and chainring though.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Patrick Madsen View Post
                      I never had a Quickie SR. Just repaired and rebuilt them for others. The plywood was to make the wider cushion sit flat. Was just a 1/4" or appleboard. We just slid it into the bottom of the cushion. Nice upgrades Smity!
                      That is a thought Patrick. For location I could fashion runners with a slim cushion support that sat inboard of the seat rails. It would eliminate the need to widen the seat frames - time better spent elsewhere on the bike. Thank you

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                      • #26
                        I like this guys approach to things bike, especially his #8 fencing wire attitude.
                        He is no mate of mine but he's not too bad for an Australian

                        Plenty of practical videos

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXuWxehSl-s

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXKONETx3GA

                        His video on wheel building revealed the difference in the build of my Shadow rear wheels - valve stem position.
                        Last edited by slow_runner; 05-13-2019, 04:31 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by slow_runner View Post
                          Hi DJ.
                          Following on from your previous observation on the chain and drives, I checked out chain gauges. Go/no go work well enough as plug gauges so I think that a simple go/no go gauge will do me.
                          How do we check the drive chainwheels, with a gauge or experience?
                          I do not know of anything that would gauge the wear of the gears or chain ring. I am not very good about maintenance I have in the past just rode till I wore something out. I have worn a number of chain rings down till they looked like saw blades. I just recently replaced two chain rings the cassette of gears and the chain on my Stricker after about 18000 miles. I am going to do my best to keep tabs on the chain and replace it as it needs to be and the gears and chain ring will last a really long time. So yes just experience but I bet there might be a mileage recommendation. I will have to google that.

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                          • #28
                            Hi DJ. before heading out for lunch this morning, I gave the chainwheels and wheel hub a treat with kero. The hub chainwheel looks a bit naff as does the chain but I will give them a thorough clean and use them while I get some readies together. On closer inspection it can be seen that the hub chainwheel has been mig welded to the original unit. I will remove it later when a new chain is fitted and make use of the original- ratios being OK, that is.
                            I assume it was welded on as a rough n ready change of ratio for the previous /or previous owner. Maybe he or she was a smaller person ( seat back was positioned well forward ).
                            I will do some counting and try my hand at working out ratios....

                            https://www.carecure.net/forum/attac...1&d=1557729436
                            Last edited by slow_runner; 05-14-2019, 01:12 AM.

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                            • #29
                              They put iron chains on and the chainring is pressed. Unless the alignment of the cassette was out, they should be okay. A better quality chain makes a difference.

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                              • #30
                                I want to say the most important thing is just doing as little as you have to right away and get on that bike and ride. With that said I also offer these suggestions.
                                I know this is down the road but when you look at upgrading things I would definerly look into getting a set og these to swap out the old grips and this way you can change over to twist shifters for the gears and have the controls right on the pedals including the scraper brake. You might even want to think about these from Top End right now if they are not to pricy. I think you get a better grip and maybe more power. Pat may could speak to the point if they would make a better choice as he has had probably many more cycles and different setups. The reason I point out the ones pictured below is because it has made a big difference having the controls on the handels for me. My first attachment I had to stop pedaling to change gears and also on the Mach 2 changing gears and when I needed extra breaking on the Mach 2 had to grab what I called the parking break so having everything on the pedals is great




                                http://www.teamhoc.com/hand-cycle-ac...ycle-grips.php
                                Attached Files

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