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  • #16
    Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
    At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.
    Yes, good point, Bonnette. The horns of a dilemma. When to advocate for yourself and everyone who is in the same space or when to keep silent and just get the services you need without making waves, especially when you don't live in an area with abundant choices of care. Sad as that is to recognize, it is reality for many.
    Last edited by SCI-Nurse; 02-16-2019, 12:43 PM. Reason: fix quote

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    • #17
      Originally posted by gjnl View Post
      My dentist and the hygienists can work on my teeth while I remain in my power chair with tilt/recline. I pull into the exam room and park the chair parallel with the regular exam chair.
      Do you find the chair jiggles and moves? I have tilt/recline as well, but it's not nearly as stable as a dentist's chair, not even close. I could handle a hygienist maybe but I would be very worried about a tooth procedure like a filling or extraction.

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      • #18
        I've got one of these https://www.promove.uk.com/promove-s...d-individuals/ easy to use and take with you. Needs up to 4 people but can be only 2 if you are light. I always take it if I am travelling and staying in hotels just in case of emergency and a quick transfer being needed

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        • #19
          What are these dentists you speak of?!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
            KLD, thank you for that link. I had no idea that health care professionals had to provide this level of accessibility - by law - for people with disabilities. I don't know of a single medical facility in my town that comes close to meeting these requirements, not even the hospital. Doctors' (especially dentists') offices are so small that there's no turning radius for chairs or rollators, so semi-ambulatory patients must default to crutches and hope for the best. Scales, exam tables and dental chairs might as well be small mountains. At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.

            I feel this situation does not need threats or anger, but business-like conversation with the dentist or office manager. Just thinking about what one would do if they went to McDonalds and ordered a Big Mac and was given a fish sandwich.....you could just eat the fish sandwich or point out that you expected a correct order.
            I have gone to a very small dental office for about 30 years. Once I began to have trouble transferring, I asked for help and they gave it to me. I always bring my transfer board (polished with Pledge to make it more slippery), but can no longer lift my legs onto the chair.
            It's so important to have a discussion with the dentist. He/She will not kick you to the curb. They want your business.

            Nice to see that SCI55years has provided information about dental work at home.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
              Do you find the chair jiggles and moves? I have tilt/recline as well, but it's not nearly as stable as a dentist's chair, not even close. I could handle a hygienist maybe but I would be very worried about a tooth procedure like a filling or extraction.
              Since having dental procedures in my wheelchair, I've only had every 6 months prophylaxis, xrays, and bonding. I may reconsider if I should need more extensive work done and then NL can transfer me to the exam chair. Meanwhile, simple dental work in my chair is very comfortable.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
                Do you find the chair jiggles and moves? I have tilt/recline as well, but it's not nearly as stable as a dentist's chair, not even close. I could handle a hygienist maybe but I would be very worried about a tooth procedure like a filling or extraction.
                My Permobil chair is rock solid. I had a crown put on a couple of weeks ago. The dentist said the chair was great. He is tall and with my elevating seat he could raise me as high as he needed.

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                • #23
                  KLD if you are reading this:

                  Is there any physical justification for someone like me (T3) with full arm and shoulder strength to (a) have trouble with the transfer and (b) have so much trouble with transfer boards?

                  I can't understand why I have so much difficult transferring. (Well, actually the T3 thing was measured 7 years ago. It's possible it crept up a bit I guess, it had before, but I don't notice increased difficulty in any other transfers, just the dentist chair).

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
                    KLD if you are reading this:

                    Is there any physical justification for someone like me (T3) with full arm and shoulder strength to (a) have trouble with the transfer and (b) have so much trouble with transfer boards?

                    I can't understand why I have so much difficult transferring. (Well, actually the T3 thing was measured 7 years ago. It's possible it crept up a bit I guess, it had before, but I don't notice increased difficulty in any other transfers, just the dentist chair).
                    I'm not trying to speak for KLD but my answer is you don't need justification. If you can't transfer then you can't transfer. I'm not saying not to try working on your technique. T3 is a high injury, you probably don't have trunk muscles, this definitely makes transferring more difficult. I'm a C5/6 incomplete, my problem is the opposite of yours. I have good trunk stability but very little arm strength. There's all kinds of reasons someone may have problems transferring. You don't need to justify it to anyone.

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                    • #25
                      I have my dentist remove their dentist chair headrest then then put it back in with the pad facing the opposite direction. I then back myself up so that my head touches the headrest. Their chair and the headrest has angle and height adjustments to make it comfortable. The headrests come off easily as in this video.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
                        KLD if you are reading this:
                        Is there any physical justification for someone like me (T3) with full arm and shoulder strength to (a) have trouble with the transfer and (b) have so much trouble with transfer boards?
                        I can't understand why I have so much difficult transferring. (Well, actually the T3 thing was measured 7 years ago. It's possible it crept up a bit I guess, it had before, but I don't notice increased difficulty in any other transfers, just the dentist chair).
                        Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                        I'm not trying to speak for KLD but my answer is you don't need justification. If you can't transfer then you can't transfer. I'm not saying not to try working on your technique. T3 is a high injury, you probably don't have trunk muscles, this definitely makes transferring more difficult. I'm a C5/6 incomplete, my problem is the opposite of yours. I have good trunk stability but very little arm strength. There's all kinds of reasons someone may have problems transferring. You don't need to justify it to anyone.
                        I agree with wes4dbt. There are many reasons why you may not be able to do this transfer without assistance. Short arms, weak or painful shoulders, lack of trunk muscles, insufficient hip range of motion (ROM), etc. are just a few. I wouldn't beat yourself up over it...it is not a personal failure! It is something that you will need to develop a work-around for in situations such as this. The transfer sling that mrb posted above is one option for many, as long as the dentist has sufficient staff to lift you with it.

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by xsfxsf View Post
                          KLD if you are reading this:

                          Is there any physical justification for someone like me (T3) with full arm and shoulder strength to (a) have trouble with the transfer and (b) have so much trouble with transfer boards?

                          I can't understand why I have so much difficult transferring. (Well, actually the T3 thing was measured 7 years ago. It's possible it crept up a bit I guess, it had before, but I don't notice increased difficulty in any other transfers, just the dentist chair).
                          I would continue practicing with transfer board, always Pledge board to reduce friction. Also, when you have anxiety about a transfer you are less likely to fully commit to it. A quad friend of mine who does great transfers once told me, "Where the head goes the body follows." In other words commit with head movement to the target. The hygienist should spot you closely the whole time.

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                          • #28
                            I'm in a manual chair and I use a transfer board. My dentist has a larger chair with an arm that comes up so I am able to use it. On the regular size chairs it CAN be challenging because your front casters may slide up onto the base of the dentist chair which can make your transfer unstable. If they have an "operating dentist chair" like I use, it might work better for you.

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