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    transferring to dental chair

    Does anyone else have difficulty transferring from the wheelchair to a dentist's chair? Every year it seems harder and harder for me to do, at this point I'm worried about the safety.

    The problem is that the dentist's chair has a big hump at its base that prevents the wheelchair from getting close to it, leaving a big gap between the wheelchair seat and the dentist chair seat. Also, the dentist chair does not tilt, so it is at a funny angle.

    I never learned to use transfer boards. I tried a few times in rehab but couldn't get the hang of it.

    #2
    A long slide board (like used for getting in/out of a car) can be helpful for these types of transfers. Keep in mind that your dentist is under an ADA mandated obligation to find a way to transfer you into the chair or have other equipment modifications available so that you can be provided the same level of care as an AB patient. This may mean getting a different style/model of dental chair installed.

    At the dental clinic at the VA hospital where I worked, we installed ceiling tract lifts into several of the dental clinic rooms, and also were evaluating one of these systems which can allow you to remain in your manual or power wheelchair (once the dental chair is removed):



    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #3
      I'm starting to have the same problem. The hygienist said she could work on patients in a tilting power chair. I might eventually have to find an old tilting manual. But there is no head support, so that has to be figured out.
      I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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        #4
        Here is another model similar to the one above. This one is made in the UK:



        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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          #5
          Wow - nice device. Makes me wonder if someday dental work could be done in a person's home. This, combined with a portable dental tool cart might help those in wheelchairs who find it hard to travel to the dental office as well as transfer to the chair.

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            #6
            im t-10 para and have trouble as well a long board does help but its still a challenge for me
            to alcohol the cause of-and solution to-all of lifes problems [homer simpson]

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              #7
              I have found dentists to be most the accommodating health care professionals. When I was no longer able to transfer to their chair from my manual wheelchair, they offered to lift me. They were experienced. After discussing related issues with me, they easily lifted me into and out of their chair. When I switched to a power chair with a reclining back, my current dentist works while I remain in it.. However, only one of his three treatment rooms can accommodate my chair in a manner that enables the power tools to reach..

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                #8
                Originally posted by triumph View Post
                Wow - nice device. Makes me wonder if someday dental work could be done in a person's home. This, combined with a portable dental tool cart might help those in wheelchairs who find it hard to travel to the dental office as well as transfer to the chair.
                This is being done. See
                https://housecalldentists.com/services/

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                  #9
                  The only thing I miss about city is a dentist saw over there. The clinic had a room that they could use for folks with tilt and recline.
                  Now it's transfer and watch as the assistant moves my chair away in rooms way to small at times that they move it to hallway.

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                    #10
                    My dentist and the hygienists can work on my teeth while I remain in my power chair with tilt/recline. I pull into the exam room and park the chair parallel with the regular exam chair. The rooms are small, but there is just enough room for the dentist and hygienists. Actually, one of the hygienists prefers the height adjustability of my chair over the exam chair. She has some trouble with her back and can stand rather than lean as she needs to do when she has to use the stool and the regular exam chair.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                      A long slide board (like used for getting in/out of a car) can be helpful for these types of transfers. Keep in mind that your dentist is under an ADA mandated obligation to find a way to transfer you into the chair or have other equipment modifications available so that you can be provided the same level of care as an AB patient. This may mean getting a different style/model of dental chair installed.

                      At the dental clinic at the VA hospital where I worked, we installed ceiling tract lifts into several of the dental clinic rooms, and also were evaluating one of these systems which can allow you to remain in your manual or power wheelchair (once the dental chair is removed):



                      (KLD)
                      Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.

                      If anyone knows of wheelchair friendly dentist @ the Modesto, Ca. area please let me know.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                        Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.

                        If anyone knows of wheelchair friendly dentist @ the Modesto, Ca. area please let me know.
                        Yeah! Threatening your dentist doesn't sound like a good idea. Which reminds me of a joke I've heard.

                        Mrs. Jones goes into her dentist's office and sits down in the exam chair. Dentist comes in and greets her, chair side, "Good morning Mrs. Jones." Mrs. Jones reaches out and grabs the dentist's "boys" and says, Good morning Dr. Smith, we aren't going to hurt each other are we."

                        When I got my tilt/recline chair with power rise, I went in to my dentist's office and showed him and the hygienists how the features worked. That is when they decided it was no problem to work on me while I stayed in my chair.

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                          #13
                          my caregive and dentist did a 2 man lift no biggey

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                            Maybe they're suppose to follow ADA rules but they don't. What are we suppose to do, threaten them? I really like my dentist and hygienist (been going 25ys) but their office has never been ADA compliant. The entry ramp is to steep, I had to pull myself up the ramp using the hand rail, now I'm using an electric chair. My granddaughter is a hygienist and has worked in many places but none of them have offered to work on me in my chair or have any special equipment to assist my situation. I just canceled a dental appointment because I didn't want to deal with getting in and out of the dental chair. The only option I see is to start paying someone to go with me and help with the transfer.
                            Who said anything about threatening them? You should though, advocate for yourself, and for others with similar needs, by educating the dentist about the fairly new (2010) ADA requirements for health care facilities and offices. The ADA is only enforced by people with disabilities doing this. Show the dentist and their office manager the ADA standards, and ask about what they are doing to meet them. If they show no interest or rebuff you, then you can file a DOJ ADA complaint. Let them know that you would rather do this with them then have to take that next step:

                            https://www.ada.gov/medcare_mobility_ta/medcare_ta.htm

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              KLD, thank you for that link. I had no idea that health care professionals had to provide this level of accessibility - by law - for people with disabilities. I don't know of a single medical facility in my town that comes close to meeting these requirements, not even the hospital. Doctors' (especially dentists') offices are so small that there's no turning radius for chairs or rollators, so semi-ambulatory patients must default to crutches and hope for the best. Scales, exam tables and dental chairs might as well be small mountains. At the same time, it's scary to contemplate threatening and alienating the very people one must turn to for help. It's a real dilemma, especially in rural areas.
                              MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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