Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Confidence in DME techs

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Confidence in DME techs

    My new Ki Rogue, I have had over a month now, with one fork that sticks. I previously wrote how the regional rep came, and changed the bearing in it, which did zilch. Now they ordered and just got in carbon frog legs. I was called by the tech, who said he needed to take the chair for two DAYS because he didn't know how to put on the forks. What?? So already this chair creaks and cracks LOUDLY when I move, super annoying, and I'm thinking it's the way this guy put it together. It has got to be 'off' somehow. So my confidence is low that he will do this right. But it's the place I got the chair, through Medicaid, and not sure what if any options I have. I don't want to be without it for two days. It's a two HOUR job! What if he messes it up, too? Ugh. Possibly he doesn't know how to put forks on a Ki chair, but still. Jeez. What would you do?

    #2
    There is a lot that can be inferred as to WHY someone is working as a wheelchair 'mechanic'...and why contact with such types is best avoided

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by heartdog View Post
      My new Ki Rogue, I have had over a month now, with one fork that sticks. I previously wrote how the regional rep came, and changed the bearing in it, which did zilch. Now they ordered and just got in carbon frog legs. I was called by the tech, who said he needed to take the chair for two DAYS because he didn't know how to put on the forks. What?? So already this chair creaks and cracks LOUDLY when I move, super annoying, and I'm thinking it's the way this guy put it together. It has got to be 'off' somehow. So my confidence is low that he will do this right. But it's the place I got the chair, through Medicaid, and not sure what if any options I have. I don't want to be without it for two days. It's a two HOUR job! What if he messes it up, too? Ugh. Possibly he doesn't know how to put forks on a Ki chair, but still. Jeez. What would you do?
      In my experience, DME "techs" and shop managers have piss poor basic mechanical knowledge. I have no doubts that your chair is "off" because the DME guy worked on it. If you are unable to do the work on the chair yourself, your best option is to find a good bicycle shop to get your tires changed, bearings replaced and such.

      Carbon Frog legs come with the caster stem bolt installed, it's an hour job at most. Go to a bicycle shop that builds wheels and repairs bicycles...ask them to install, if you can get them away from the DME tech. He probably won't want to let them go because of the super high labor per hour they charge.

      Comment


        #4
        Well. This is just making me SMH. He did find it was easy to do, and got the chair back. On a hilarious aside, the footplates have been too low, so they ordered risers, and I did a foam hack with sticky stuff. Well, the footplate, an H style angle adjustable, was able to go up another inch. Now it's perfect. A month later. Oh, and the creakingcracking ? Loose screws all over the seat pan. Jeez.

        The FrogLegs Carbon forks are a dream, floats on our jaggedy sidewalks. However, got the dreaded flutter, and in a weird way. Like light rapid vibrating kind. I call the tech. He swears he 'machined' the surface of the chair where the forks attach (?!) and asked about my dog pulling me again. Dude, I say, I've gone fast in chairs my whole life, it's not some stupid thing nobody does. People have dogs, and go fast. It shouldn't flutter. He says there's nothing to do, because there is no bearings. So you can't tighten it.
        Needless to say, I'm over this place. There must be some way to fix the flutter. Gonna go visit Hands On Concepts soon, and Steve can work miracles I'm sure.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Andy View Post
          There is a lot that can be inferred as to WHY someone is working as a wheelchair 'mechanic'...and why contact with such types is best avoided
          Unfortunately, the same can be said of almost all "professions"...

          OTOH, most "customers" are clueless as well.

          Comment


            #6
            Well let's face it, nothing prestigious about wrenching on wheelchairs. There's probably not many out there that has the aspersations of becoming a wheelchair mechanic. Hence, most are delivery people/techs. They get taught by a lunch and learn and become technicians.

            Comment


              #7
              So far the best DME Techs are ones that are owners or partners in the business they are doing their own tech work. Mostly other Techs liked already posted are 'it's only job I could find'. Course they usually move on when they find a better paying job.
              Had some Techs do more damage than helped.
              Once had flat, ca;;ed atoind til found shop that had tube in stock that fit. Should of called bike shop, learned that later. Well that tech took wheel off and when putting it on for some reason could only get part way on with rubber mallet.
              Stopped at another DME for them to see why chair was wobbling on that side. That Tech pulled took nut, only partly on and then had get bar pried off wheel saying one thing wrong no key in keyway but no reason for wheel be on like that. But, he soon learned why, sure enough key was a good ways past keyway. They called around and found a new set of drivewheels with no flat tires mounted to replace both on my chair. No more flats!

              Comment


                #8
                Does anyone know how to tighten Frog Legs? I think the composite ones are slightly different. I can't find anything on the web. They're vibration fluttering something awful, and the tech is not going to fix. Still pisses me off that so many blame the fact my dog pulls me in my chair. Which isn't really, it's just momentum cruising.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Rather fix my own chair. Have done so for 30+yrs.

                  Faster, more reliable, cheaper.
                  Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                  T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                    Rather fix my own chair. Have done so for 30+yrs.

                    Faster, more reliable, cheaper.
                    Unfortunately, not everyone has the dexterity, skillset and motivation to do so.

                    I've been accused of doing too much "by myself" -- instead of hiring (cough) "professionals".

                    OTOH, when you start digging into something (chair, car, computer, etc.) you are more likely to notice other upcoming problems than some guy who's just trying to deal with the problem at hand and get back to his lunch. "Gee, this wire is frayed..." "Hmmm, is this a crack forming?" "What the heck has been rubbing against this??"

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by automation View Post
                      Originally posted by lynnifer View Post
                      Rather fix my own chair. Have done so for 30+yrs.
                      Unfortunately, not everyone has the dexterity, skillset and motivation to do so.
                      Skillset can be learned.
                      Motivation is being insanely frustrated by DME repair techs and having your chair disappear for days
                      So if you have the dexterity, what's the excuse?

                      Swapping out caster bearings took half a day the first time I tried. Now I can do all four in under 60min. Put on an episode of Breaking Bad and It's not a bad way to spend an hour.

                      Take control of your equipment - the thing that you cannot survive without. Take ownership of your wheelchair.

                      We're here to help and answer questions along the way.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Tetracyclone View Post
                          While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.
                          Nobody should fault you for that. BTW if you get the chance ask him if Marathons are harder to install on wheelchair wheels than bicycle wheels. I'm thinking about tightness and the issue of pinched tubes.
                          I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                            BTW if you get the chance ask him if Marathons are harder to install on wheelchair wheels than bicycle wheels. .
                            After years of installing Marathons and finding the tricks of doing that best...putting my new Right Runs on my wheels were done with my bare hands and no tools. Marathons learn you good that way, lol

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Tetracyclone View Post
                              While I agree with Brian I also get frustrated with certain tasks. Taking off my marathon tires is tough and my finger dexterity slow and limited. I found a mobile bike repair guy who I pay to do tires. Everything else I do myself and it was not a big deal to learn, but I recognize that my dad gave me a leg up by teaching me to fix my bike when he first bought me one at age 7. When you have never done something there is an intimidation factor and in that case it is best to invite a friend to help, for the moral support.
                              Exactly. "Anyone" can learn how to do brain surgery. Why aren't there more brain surgeons?

                              People learn best when they are exposed to something repeatedly. I can teach my other half how to change a tire -- hell, it's easy! But, the time between my teaching her and the time she actually gets a flat will probably be long enough that she'll forget exactly where to position the jack (so the unitized body doesn't crumble if placed wrong). Or, that the valve stem on the spare needs to face outwards when the tire is mounted. Or, that she needs to periodically check the inflation of the spare to ensure it's ready for use, when the time comes.

                              And, that's a relatively "common" occurrence -- far more common than replacing the PCV valve (which is arguably an easier task).

                              I've found many people tend to get intimidated or overcautious with tasks that have high "failure costs". I.e., screw up your chair repair and now you're stuck waiting even longer to get mobile, again! For them, the "peace of mind" that comes with off-loading the task to a "paid professional" is well worth the added cost (and inconvenience).

                              Think back to the days when VCRs were common in virtually every home. Why did so many of them NOT display the correct time? Did you need a PhD in order to set the clock? (or, was it a rare enough occurrence -- power failure -- that you forgot how and misplaced the manual that would remind you?)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X