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    Hoyer Advance 340 lift

    Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

    Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.

    How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.

    Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?

    Or would it just be better to get a manual lift for my purposes. I've never used a lift so I have have no idea how difficult a manual lift would be.

    btw - I thinking about the portable because I want to fold it up and keep it out of the way. I don't have a lot of extra space in my condo.

    Thanks

    #2
    Can't speak to the battery issues, but a powered lift is much safer to use than a manual for your caregivers.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
      Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

      Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.
      You should be able to replace the battery located inside the battery pack. I'll have to check, to be sure, but I think these are just normal gelled electrolyte batteries (in a fancy case).

      How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.
      That depends a lot on the design of the charger. Most aren't designed for long-term "float" service. And, most batteries left on a float charge will degrade, over time. Ideally, they want to be cycled, periodically. That poses a problem for the designer: when is it "safe" to discharge the battery in preparation for recharging it, again? What if the user picks that moment to NEED the battery?

      Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?
      I will have to check to see which model lift I was working on (refurbishing) but I had initially considered it "broken" because it wasn't working "properly" while connected to mains voltage. ISTR thinking that, perhaps, their justification was that you wouldn't want the lift to be movable while tethered to the mains, so, disable it!

      I'll have to check (next monday). Hopefully, my memory won't fault between now and then :-/

      Comment


        #4
        KLD, Don't have care giver yet, know the day is coming. C5/6 quad turning 65 this month. Took a look at my home yesterday and it was quite clear that there were very few places I could use a lift. Wouldn't fit in my bath/shower area, couldn't use it for getting in/out of bed because the bed sits directly on the floor, wouldn't fit down the hall. My living room is about the only place it would have enough room to maneuver around. I don't know how much overhead tracts cost but got a feeling it's probably out of my price range. Got me a little worried.

        automation, Any additional information will be appreciated.

        Thanks for the replies.

        Comment


          #5
          You can't operate a floor based lift by yourself, so whomever is going to assist you will find a powered lift much safer for them. You can do ceiling track lifts, or free standing track lifts, but as you say, they are not cheap, and you of course can only use them where you have installed track. The track lift companies will all provide you with a design and bid based on what your needs are (after making a home visit).

          If you need a caregiver, it would also be better for their back to have a bed that is not just a mattress/box spring on the floor. How do you transfer now?

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
            You can't operate a floor based lift by yourself, so whomever is going to assist you will find a powered lift much safer for them. You can do ceiling track lifts, or free standing track lifts, but as you say, they are not cheap, and you of course can only use them where you have installed track. The track lift companies will all provide you with a design and bid based on what your needs are (after making a home visit).

            If you need a caregiver, it would also be better for their back to have a bed that is not just a mattress/box spring on the floor. How do you transfer now?

            (KLD)
            I have a little leg use and between that and locking my shoulders and arms, I'm able to transfer. But it's starting to get sketchy, especially the first thing in the morning. I gotta do a little exercise sitting on the edge of the bed to get the blood flowing before I transfer. lol

            Comment


              #7
              Some years back I was afraid of falling in my home and needing help to get up, as I am a C6 quad. This would require a two-person operation. I decided to get an emergency lift which will enable only one person to do the job, as even the strongest caregiver who is good at bed to chair transfers would be in a dangerous position to get someone off the floor. That being said you would need some way to communicate to someone that you need help and to come to the house/apartment, as well as a means to get in. This can be done with a key lockbox outside the door that someone knows the combination to or you can give the combination to.

              If you go this route 1st make sure that your lift can get you off the floor, as most lifts are designed only for bed/chair heights. Next, if it is only going to be used for emergencies, and hopefully rarely at that, I would not go for something that needs a battery as will rarely be used and will require constant monitoring/charging/replacement, if not usage to keep it in reliable working order.

              I have a old Smith lift that operates on some type of worm gear crank. It requires extremely little effort.

              Again, the key is to make sure your lift can get you off the floor, as the leverage on the base and arm is greater than in your standard bed lift.

              An overhead lift which is naturally fixed in location would not be a good solution if you think you may need to be lifted off the floor in any room of the house.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                Thinking about buying the portable Hoyer 340. Right now it will only be for emergencies , like falling on the floor or maybe I hurt my shoulder. Trying to decide if I should get the electric or manual. I would like to get the electric but it runs on lead acid batteries but worried they'll go bad while in storage. A new battery pack is @ $250.00. So a couple of questions,

                Can you take apart the battery pack and just replace the batteries inside, would probably be a lot cheaper.

                How long does a battery pack last if left always on the charger.

                Will the lift work if the batteries are dead but you have the unit plugged in to the wall outlet?

                Or would it just be better to get a manual lift for my purposes. I've never used a lift so I have have no idea how difficult a manual lift would be.

                btw - I thinking about the portable because I want to fold it up and keep it out of the way. I don't have a lot of extra space in my condo.

                Thanks
                I have an electric Hoyer Advance. It works really good. Yes you can take the battery pack apart and replace the batteries. They told me to keep it on the charge when not in use. They said you should not let the batteries drain all the way down. The lift will not work if the batteries are dead period. Having it plugged in will do nothing.

                Comment


                  #9
                  crags,
                  Again, the key is to make sure your lift can get you off the floor, as the leverage on the base and arm is greater than in your standard bed lift.
                  I agree but the question is how do you know till you try. I was hoping to buy the lift from eBay or Craigs list to save some money. I think I need to do some more research before I make a choice.

                  Hack, That's good info about the batteries. How long have you had the lift? Have you ever had to replace the batteries?

                  Thanks for the reply.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                    crags,


                    I agree but the question is how do you know till you try. I was hoping to buy the lift from eBay or Craigs list to save some money. I think I need to do some more research before I make a choice.

                    Hack, That's good info about the batteries. How long have you had the lift? Have you ever had to replace the batteries?

                    Thanks for the reply.
                    I've had the lift for around 3 years. I had the batteries replaced once. My fault I didn't keep the lift plugged in when it wasn't being used. Big no no. Took it to the Interstate Batteries store and the guy popped the case open and replaced the batteries.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
                      I've had the lift for around 3 years. I had the batteries replaced once. My fault I didn't keep the lift plugged in when it wasn't being used. Big no no.
                      I think the question is: "How long can you leave the lift plugged in and UNUSED before the batteries won't cut the mustard." Unless you expect "emergencies" to be relatively common...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by automation View Post
                        I think the question is: "How long can you leave the lift plugged in and UNUSED before the batteries won't cut the mustard." Unless you expect "emergencies" to be relatively common...
                        The only way I will know is when it doesn't work. Unfortunately then I'm screwed until I can get the batteries replaced.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Hack, Do you use your on a regular basis?

                          automation, I like the thought of the electric but not sure it makes sense to spend the extra money and constantly maintain the batteries for something I might not use for months or years. I can find a simple manual lift that's used for @ $200. I really want the Hoyer Advance compact portable (don't know where id store a regular lift) but they're $1,400 new. Haven't found any used manual ones, found a couple of the portable electric. But by the time you add shipping your talking @ $1,200 - $1,500 and then you have to maintain the batteries.


                          I'll be 65 this month and not sure how much longer I'll be living independently, hoping 2-5 years. Maybe I should just get a cheap manual lift, stick it in my small side yard and throw a tarp over it, till the time comes I'll need one on a regular basis. Getting old sucks but so does the alternative.

                          Thanks for the replies.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by HACKNSACK44 View Post
                            The only way I will know is when it doesn't work. Unfortunately then I'm screwed until I can get the batteries replaced.
                            The problem with all battery systems (battery powered devices) is matching the actual usage with the usage patterns for which the system was designed.

                            For example, battery powered tools are designed for rapid recharge -- because a "worker" doesn't want to have to wait around for a battery to charge (so, you'd like the battery to charge in the time that your "spare" takes to "run down").

                            I have lots of UPSs, here. We rarely have outages so the need for the batteries is very "occasional". And, when there is an outage, it is often brief (lights flickering, etc.). Even if it is extended, I can arrange to shut down the computer promptly. So, I can tolerate batteries having "reduced capacity".

                            I'd prefer the UPSs to treat the batteries very gently -- with a goal towards maximizing their useful life. But, the UPS designers want the batteries to be recharged quickly (to protect against any OTHER outages). And, they are in the business of selling batteries so the idea of making the batteries last longer just doesn't fit with their mindsets!

                            If you're designing a lift, you are probably assuming it sees daily usage. So, you want the batteries to "always" appear to be fully charged. You probably DON'T plan on a lift sitting in the corner, on its charger, WAITING to be used at some future date. As a result, you design the battery pack and charger for the "regular usage" case -- at the expense of the "maximal lifespan".

                            [I hate batteries -- because they "always" need replacing when you need them! (how often do you notice the batteries in your flashlight are dead when you AREN'T USING the flashlight?! ]

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by wes4dbt View Post
                              I like the thought of the electric but not sure it makes sense to spend the extra money and constantly maintain the batteries for something I might not use for months or years.
                              Understood. I refurbished a little 3-wheel "scooter" for a woman, here. She had to buy new batteries. I wonder how often she actually uses it (as she doesn't have a lift on her vehicle so any use will be around the house or rely on a helpful neighbor to load it into her trunk)

                              I can find a simple manual lift that's used for @ $200. I really want the Hoyer Advance compact portable (don't know where id store a regular lift) but they're $1,400 new. Haven't found any used manual ones, found a couple of the portable electric. But by the time you add shipping your talking @ $1,200 - $1,500 and then you have to maintain the batteries.
                              One of the problems with DME is that it tends to be large/bulky --> expensive to ship! So, if you can't find it locally, the potential savings (used) are easily offset by the cost of getting it delivered.

                              Check to see if there are any local organizations that refurbish donated/surplus kit. Or, that maintain a DME "lending library".

                              Finding these places/people is often tricky. But, I have been chagrined at how much "stuff" ends up headed towards the landfill! Of course, you don't really have the range of selections that you'd get "at retail" as you're relying on someone discarding/outgrowing their kit and bringing it to such a place.

                              I'll be 65 this month...
                              Happy Birthday!

                              and not sure how much longer I'll be living independently, hoping 2-5 years. Maybe I should just get a cheap manual lift, stick it in my small side yard and throw a tarp over it, till the time comes I'll need one on a regular basis.
                              How accessible would it be, for you, there? If it's going to be a PITA to use, then is it really worth the effort? Similarly, will any "assisted living" facility that you end up in have room to accommodate it? (or, would you rely on them providing whatever you needed?)

                              I tend to take a practical outlook on these things. I'm much less concerned with how the house LOOKS ("Why is that toolbox in the middle of the living room floor?") and, rather, concentrate on getting things arranged so they serve my needs.

                              But, then again, this often results in CHAOS (Can't Have Anyone Over, Syndrome)

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