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disrupting wheelchair design : distributed wheelchair design and manufacture

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  • disrupting wheelchair design : distributed wheelchair design and manufacture

    Be sure to watch both the videos

    https://www.disruptdisability.org
    Last edited by NW-Will; 09-23-2018, 06:31 PM.

  • #2
    Disrupt Disability: designing wheelchairs with a difference


    https://www.theguardian.com/theobserver/2018/sep/16/new-radicals-2018-disrupt-disability-wheelchair-design

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    • #3
      Should read disrupting wheelchair design... intersting options they're introducing

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      • #4
        Interesting; I certainly appreciate their effort and ideas, and hope they succeed, but the narrative that options don't exist, and that custom fitting and design isn't already a thing, is kinda bullshit. A number of attempts at "reinventing the wheel"-chair haven't met with much success, in large part because the most common design is very effective and adaptable without needing to be overly complex, expensive, and unwieldy.
        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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        • #5
          cheers.
          Originally posted by Patton57 View Post
          Should read disrupting wheelchair design... intersting options they're introducing

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          • #6
            Those were my thoughts initially, but the more I watched and read I started to be seduced by the idea of being able to add parts that would fit directly into a modular design. The idea of individuals being able to build parts that work for them and share them so others could share them or build improve on them. Especially as the capabilities of 3D printing etc become easier, cheaper and more accessible.

            Originally posted by Oddity View Post
            Interesting; I certainly appreciate their effort and ideas, and hope they succeed, but the narrative that options don't exist, and that custom fitting and design isn't already a thing, is kinda bullshit. A number of attempts at "reinventing the wheel"-chair haven't met with much success, in large part because the most common design is very effective and adaptable without needing to be overly complex, expensive, and unwieldy.

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            • #7
              Seems like they're starting from the assumption that all wheelchair users have core muscles and trunk stability based on the seating examples. I'd pay a small fortune for a chair that included that feature!
              T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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              • #8
                Christian Bagg envisioned this many years ago with the Stryker Sorano. When they developed the Icon A1, Christian and Jeff Adams incorporated the concept of using modularity to be able to quickly reconfigure their chair for different contexts of use. Definitely not a new idea.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SCI_OTR View Post
                  Christian Bagg envisioned this many years ago with the Stryker Sorano. When they developed the Icon A1, Christian and Jeff Adams incorporated the concept of using modularity to be able to quickly reconfigure their chair for different contexts of use. Definitely not a new idea.
                  Not a new idea and also not a spectacularly successful one either. I think there is a flaw in the premise that we're suffering for a lack of modularity. It's a fine idea, to be sure, but the chair using population is already a small market. Mize hit on this, and I think this idea also assumes a level of activity that just isn't predominant in the chair using community. Some of us are super active or athletic and could benefit from a single chair that could reconfigure for multiple activity purposes, but, in all honesty, most of us just need something simple, well fit, reasonbly light enough for transfers, and durable. There are benefits to modularity, I recognize that, but it's not a huge hole in our lives that needs a 'revolution' to 'disrupt' the industry. That idea ignores the reality of what I think most chair users need out of their chairs. I don't think they're gonna disrupt much, but might help fill a niche for some folks.
                  "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                  "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                  Comment

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