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Will these foam Foot Liners prevent "Foot Drop"?

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    Will these foam Foot Liners prevent "Foot Drop"?

    Greetings,

    A so-called health care professional gave me a pair of eggcrated foam Foot Liners and told me that they will prevent "Foot Drop." I did a web search and and the foot liners appear to be paired with the following vinyl-covered boots, but I was only given the foam foot liners as a standalone item as Heel Protectors.

    Here's the product:
    AliMed? Boot and Foam Liner
    https://www.alimed.com/alimed-boot-and-foam-liner.html


    I'm not sure about his claims, but just by looking at them I have my doubts that these soft foam liners will perform as he said they will. What's you opinion? Thanks!

    #2
    They might help a little for those with flaccid paralysis, but are totally insufficient for those with spasticity. In fact, there are really no boots that will completely prevent foot drop in spastic paralysis. Much better ways to prevent this are to stand at least 1 hour daily, and to wear shoes and properly positioned footrests while using a wheelchair.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
      They might help a little for those with flaccid paralysis, but are totally insufficient for those with spasticity. In fact, there are really no boots that will completely prevent foot drop in spastic paralysis. Much better ways to prevent this are to stand at least 1 hour daily, and to wear shoes and properly positioned footrests while using a wheelchair.

      (KLD)
      Thank you SCI-Nurse. Can you please explain the difference between spastic paralysis and flaccid paralysis? As a bed bound person with quadreplegia, my chances of INCREASING (I say that because I think I already have foot drop to some degree, but not as severe as I've seen on other people) foot drop worries me a lot.
      Last edited by UrbanWheeler76; 6 Aug 2018, 10:45 AM.

      Comment


        #4
        Why are you bed bound?

        Do you get range of motion (ROM) stretching done daily? Does this include good stretching of your ankles?

        Do you have spasticity (high muscle tone) or spasms (involuntary muscle movement) below your level of injury? This would be spastic paralysis. Or do you have no muscle tone at all in your paralyzed muscles (flaccid paralysis)?

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


          #5
          I'm bed bound due to a number of situations, but are nearly 75% self-imposed. I don't like the environment where I live nor the people either. I don't want to socialize with anyone and I've long since been isolated from true friends who I can trust who are not out to steal, scam, or take advantage. Deceitful and predatory relatives have so far been my worst enemies. Being in bed a lot also helps me to rely less on lazy homemakers, too, who seem to be plentiful these days. I just lost the drive and motivation to get out much. Pressure sores take up the remaining 25%.

          Oh, I do have spasms in my legs. They've slowed down quite a bit, though. I almost forgot about ROM...which I don't do! I need to rig something up so that I can do it independently because I can't really count on anyone else to help me with that.

          Comment


            #6
            It would be best to have a PT teach you how to do safe independent ROM. We taught all our patients with paraplegia to do this. Most used a strap like this:

            https://breakingmuscle.com/reviews/g...product-review

            You are right that the boot above is pretty much worthless. It is actually supposed to be a liner for these vinyl coated boots, which are pretty good: https://www.alimed.com/alimed-boot-a...IaApHwEALw_wcB

            I like these bed boots. They protect your skin much better than the one above, and provide some (but not complete) ankle dorsiflexion to help prevent foot drop: https://shopsageproducts.com/store/p...ector-III.aspx

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              It would be best to have a PT teach you how to do safe independent ROM. We taught all our patients with paraplegia to do this. Most used a strap like this:

              https://breakingmuscle.com/reviews/g...product-review

              You are right that the boot above is pretty much worthless. It is actually supposed to be a liner for these vinyl coated boots, which are pretty good: https://www.alimed.com/alimed-boot-a...IaApHwEALw_wcB

              I like these bed boots. They protect your skin much better than the one above, and provide some (but not complete) ankle dorsiflexion to help prevent foot drop: https://shopsageproducts.com/store/p...ector-III.aspx

              (KLD)
              Great info SCI-Nurse, thank you very much for sharing it with me. I found a pic of myself sitting in my w/c about a year ago, and this currently looks like how my feet rests on the foot petals. IMO the foot drop doesn't appear too bad, and the adjustable petals helps to accommodate whatever degree of foot drop I do have. I'm hoping that not only would the boots you've recommended prevent further droppage, but through independent ROM, I can also reverse those affects shown in the pic. I plan on getting a light weight manual w/c sometime in the fall, and I think my existing foot drop will look much more worse and obvious if said chair does not come with adjustable petals.


              Comment


                #8
                You do have (from the pictures) some foot drop already, and that may or may not be reversible with boots and ROM. Is there any possibility of your getting and using a standing frame? This is one of the best ways to correct and prevent foot drop.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                  You do have (from the pictures) some foot drop already, and that may or may not be reversible with boots and ROM. Is there any possibility of your getting and using a standing frame? This is one of the best ways to correct and prevent foot drop.

                  (KLD)
                  I will need to find out who exactly do I consult with regarding a standing frame because at the present time I don't have access to any Physical Therapists. Maybe my visiting physician (who comes over to my apartment once a month) can make it happen...I dunno.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Since starting full-time work with a longer commute I've had to cut back my standing time...but now I have to rethink that.
                    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I found these "Medline Industries MDT823330 HEELMEDIX Heel Protectors" on Amazon.com and was wondering how do these compare to the Prevalon Heel Protector. For starters, they are much cheaper in price, and one customer says the velcro lasts longer than Prevalon's. I like the fact that they come with Mesh bags for washing them in the washing machine. Don't know about the overall build quality though. Check out the video too.













                      • Closure Type Hook & Loop
                      • Inner material is absorbent
                      • Mesh laundry bag included
                      • Inner lining helps reduce friction and shear on heels
                      • Inner material is absorbent, keeping the skin dry
                      • Helps protect against foot drop
                      • Multiple strapping options for custom fit, comfort and results
                      • Color coded tags for quick size identification


                      | You Save:
                      | $5.00 (10%)


                      https://www.amazon.com/Medline-Indus...ustomerReviews

                      Comment


                        #12
                        We evaluated those (when I was still working) and both our staff and clients who tried them found the Sage Prevalon superior for staying in place when applied, and not causing as much sweating of the feet.

                        (KLD)
                        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                          We evaluated those (when I was still working) and both our staff and clients who tried them found the Sage Prevalon superior for staying in place when applied, and not causing as much sweating of the feet.

                          (KLD)

                          Great. Those are important factors I'll take into consideration...thanks again for all your help!

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I have the Prevalon boots in my shopping cart and ready to order them. Before I place this order I need to know one more thing: Are the wedges detachable and can be re-attached and used *only when needed*? I ask because as a quad I can position myself in bed (with some struggle, of course, Lol) but those wedges look like they will be a big hassle and also prevent me from turning side to side at night and throughout the day. I do admit that I tend to favor laying on my right side A LOT.
                            Last edited by UrbanWheeler76; 17 Aug 2018, 7:10 AM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The wedges can be detached. I would recommend getting the ones with the wedges though, as they are superior in keeping your feet in a neutral position (vs. externally rotated) when you are flat on your back, and keeping pressure off your external ankle bones (maleolus). You can use the wedges when needed, or not.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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