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    #16
    Originally posted by rye1945 View Post
    Hey Oddity: do you scoot your butt forward on your cushion before cathing? I have found that if I do that, it allows me to lean back, opens the area up for ease of cathing, and seems to allow the catheter to find its way to the bladder better for me. Seems to me that if you are having the catheter stopping and coming out bloody, you may be creating a false passage. You don't want that. Anyway, moving my butt forward has always made cathing easier both from the outside and inside
    I scoot out to the edge of my chair to cath. If I am down in the bucket bladder does not drain fully. Also as you mention it does seem to open up area and make for easy passage,imo.

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      #17
      Originally posted by rye1945 View Post
      Hey Oddity: do you scoot your butt forward on your cushion before cathing? I have found that if I do that, it allows me to lean back, opens the area up for ease of cathing, and seems to allow the catheter to find its way to the bladder better for me. Seems to me that if you are having the catheter stopping and coming out bloody, you may be creating a false passage. You don't want that. Anyway, moving my butt forward has always made cathing easier both from the outside and inside
      Yep, I do scooch forward and sometimes lean back. That creates a lot of sheer force on my ischials and sacrum but does help the cath pass.
      "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

      "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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        #18
        washer with bleach then air dry
        Originally posted by Cowboys_Place View Post
        How do you wash your cushion? I use the same one but have never washed mine.
        Bike-on.com rep
        John@bike-on.com
        c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
        sponsored handcycle racer

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          #19
          Originally posted by rye1945 View Post
          I have an SCI and work in an SCI facility but I am not a clinician. Still, I can tell you the pressure mapping is only one part of the "comprehensive" evaluation. You can sit on several cushions and see how they do with the pressure mapping. This is where a thin fabric layer is placed on top of your cushion. It has sensor in it that display different colors on a computer screen based on how much pressure you are putting on the areas. Butt bones (ischial) will generally be more presser than say your thigh.

          With a sense of which cushion looks better via mapping, you can then look a stability, positioning, etc. etc. No one "tool" tells you everything. But with pressure mapping, sitting on a number of cushions, testing you positioning, etc. etc., you can make an educated decision.

          That being said, I am lazy. So, I have not actually done pressure mapping since I got a Jay 2 15 years ago. The Jay 3 seemed like an equivalent cushion so without any issues, I just went with it.

          Hope that this answers your question just a bit.
          It just seems like you can't possibly try enough circumstances with mapping, especially for someone who has difficulty transferring. In a given time frame of an hour, or so, you could test maybe 4-5 cushions, and perhaps not the correct size. And each of those tests are of very specific circumstances. Even slight changes in those circumstances could have completely changed the map. For instance one cushion might look like a poor map, but just one more degree of dump and the cushion might be great. But the user won't know because that circumstance isn't being tested. I realize there is no perfect testing, if we don't have extensive tests with access to all the available cushions. But, it seems to me that mapping is being oversold; it is giving you very limited data that appears to be (since its result seem to scientific) far more definitive than it can claim. Mapping seems to give people the false belief that they have the best cushion. At best, to me, it appears that mapping might be able to rule out some poor choices. If this is the case, I think we should be presenting it this way on this forum.
          C-6/7 incomplete

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            #20
            Originally posted by fuentejps View Post
            yah I'm with xs, supracor is good on my butt, 20 yrs now no issues. I have 2 going at all times, rotate and wash weekly. when you wash a supracor it fluffs back up.
            My Rohos have been getting a lot of punctures lately, so I've decided to give the Supracor Stimulite Classic with the XS option a shot, but I have relaxed the fabric seat pan on both my indoor and outdoor wheelchairs. So does that mean that I should get the "sling bottom"? I'm not sure what the "sling bottom" option is and I can't find any pictures of what that looks like using Google Image Search.

            (Having a T4 SCI for over 28 years, I too am skin and bones back there.)

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              #21
              Originally posted by fasdude View Post
              My Rohos have been getting a lot of punctures lately, so I've decided to give the Supracor Stimulite Classic with the XS option a shot, but I have relaxed the fabric seat pan on both my indoor and outdoor wheelchairs. So does that mean that I should get the "sling bottom"? I'm not sure what the "sling bottom" option is and I can't find any pictures of what that looks like using Google Image Search.

              (Having a T4 SCI for over 28 years, I too am skin and bones back there.)
              As I understand it, the sling bottom has an extra little thin piece stuck on the bottom to accommodate the slump of the cloth sling. Personally, if Roho works for you, I would not change even though I use Supracor. I'd try to figure out the cause of the punctures instead.
              I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                #22
                Thank you, Kulea, for your comments about pressure mapping. So many comments on CC regarding seating/cushion issues. I feel not enough is being done on this important topic in the field of rehabilitation professionals. A perfectly mapped cushion may be only one part of skin health. I'd like to see more information about skin inspection, nutrition, transfer techniques, pressure relief, etc. Perhaps all these issues should be addressed by various professionals at a Wheelchair Seating Service.

                As a paralyzed person with sensation (Polio), I am constantly moving/leaning, lifting with elbows, to stay comfortable in my chair. It seems like I move around every minute or so to avoid the burning sensation. If I fail to keep moving because I'm totally focused on some project or another, I will definitely develop a blister on my bottom, then spend a week getting it to subside. After trying numerous cushions over the years, and pressure mapping, I am awaiting delivery of a Ride Java, which will be the first cushion I'll try with a "pit" in the center.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                  As I understand it, the sling bottom has an extra little thin piece stuck on the bottom to accommodate the slump of the cloth sling. Personally, if Roho works for you, I would not change even though I use Supracor. I'd try to figure out the cause of the punctures instead.
                  I honestly don't think Roho's quality is as good as it was. 5 years ago I had a quadtro and I was constantly repairing it. After that, I got a single compartment High Profile Roho. It had been doing well until about 6-8 months ago, when I started getting a bunch of pinhole leaks but no sand granules. (In the past the only reason I was getting pinhole leaks were from grains of sand that were coming in at the open corners. The heavy duty "incontinence" cover solved that problem.) I've always had short arms and struggled with my weight so transfers have never been super clean. I got hit by a van while crossing the street in 2007 and it really F'ed up my back so I stopped working out and lie down a lot when I'm home. So I've gained about 40lbs at my gut and consequently my transfers have gotten pretty sloppy. All the pin hole leaks happen on the leading edge and front corners of my cushion. Grinding my bony ass against the front of my cushion during transfers is what I figure is causing all these new pin hole leaks.

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