Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hoyer Sling

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Hoyer Sling

    I really need a sling that I can remove once I'm in my chair and can put back under me at the end of the day. My last one was thrown away when I was transferred via an ambulance to the emergency room. The one I just purchased must be too big because I slid out while in the air and was fortunate that my wife was paying attention. I googled "U-sling" and it looked like the same kind of sling but it had a different strap style. Could someone please help with some ideas. My current sling is a full body one that I sit on throughout the day and it causes me to slide out little bits at a time and is killing my back considering I already have two degenerative disks in my L4-5. Thanks folks
    Say what you mean and mean what you say because those who mind dont matter and those who matter dont mind.

    My Myspace



    #2
    Originally posted by GoTWHeeLs View Post
    I really need a sling that I can remove once I'm in my chair and can put back under me at the end of the day. My last one was thrown away when I was transferred via an ambulance to the emergency room. The one I just purchased must be too big because I slid out while in the air and was fortunate that my wife was paying attention. I googled "U-sling" and it looked like the same kind of sling but it had a different strap style. Could someone please help with some ideas. My current sling is a full body one that I sit on throughout the day and it causes me to slide out little bits at a time and is killing my back considering I already have two degenerative disks in my L4-5. Thanks folks
    I would recommend a hygiene sling. Just type it in Google and you will see what it is. I use one with my ceiling lift and portable hoyer advance.

    Comment


      #3
      What brand of lift do you have? Is the cradle two point or four point? Most lift manufacturers make slings in many different types to work together with their lifts, so that is where you should start in looking to replace your old sling. It is not recommended to sit on a full body sling all day...it takes away the pressure reducing features of your cushion, and can lead to skin breakdown, much less problems with the straps catching on things including your wheels/casters.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
        It is not recommended to sit on a full body sling all day...it takes away the pressure reducing features of your cushion, and can lead to skin breakdown, much less problems with the straps catching on things including your wheels/casters.

        (KLD)
        Do you have any research to back up the negative impact of an all day sling? I had one care home who wanted me to use one and struggled to find any evidence one way or the other.

        Comment


          #5
          No, just experience with a number of pressure ulcers developed in my clients who were in nursing homes that refused to remove it in spite of the person being in a sling that is pretty easy to remove, and our recommendations that it not be left in place all the time.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            I have an Invacare Reliant 450 Lift and this is the sling I use with it. No problem removing it in the morning after I'm in the chair or putting it back in place to transfer back to bed.

            http://www.invacare.com/cgi-bin/imhq...OID=-536885362
            Tom

            "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              No, just experience with a number of pressure ulcers developed in my clients who were in nursing homes that refused to remove it in spite of the person being in a sling that is pretty easy to remove, and our recommendations that it not be left in place all the time.

              (KLD)
              That seems to be all anyone has other than a Manchester university survey of pressure over a 15 minute period with AB subjects. It was commissioned by a sling maker!

              I'm surprised that there is no decent survey as it seems quite common for care homes to want to save time leaving the sling in. It was the OT at the care home I was imprisoned who ordered an all day sling for me. Only after asking for data to backup its use and asking my spinal unit did I get them to not use it.

              Comment


                #8
                Most likely such studies will be done in Europe, where there is a much longer history of mandatory use of lifts vs. manual lifting by care staff. Here is a white paper from the NPUAP (National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel, like the EPUAP in Europe) from 2015 noting the need for more studies:

                http://npuap.org/wp-content/uploads/...March-2015.pdf

                Here is a study that looked at the impact of slings on seating interface pressures, but does not look at actual pressure injury incidence:

                http://search.proquest.com/openview/...olar&cbl=48772

                In addition, there are really no ways to measure friction or shear forces between the body and the sitting or laying surface, and these may be significant factors in the development of pressure injuries when sitting on a sling. Most pressure injuries (ulcers) actually develop under a large multi-factoral conditions, including things like nutrition, bed support surface/turning, wheelchair cushion, weight shifts, and interface pressures, use of tobacco products, disability factors (such as paralysis), co-morbidities like diabetes, etc. etc. etc.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thanks for the links. Given the cost of treatment for a pressure sore you would think that it would be examined a bit more closely but as pointed out there are a lot of variables.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X