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Does anyone have a Permomobil standing chair

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    Does anyone have a Permomobil standing chair

    I am desperate for real experience on this front. Can it get you really truly fully upright and weight-bearing? Are your legs and back at 180?. If the chair capable of that? Can it be adjusted to make that happen?

    #2
    I demo'd one and it's definitely weight bearing.
    T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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      #3
      My daughter got the Permobil F5 VS in December and yes, it is weight bearing. Just an awesome piece of engineering. She loves it!

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        #4
        I have a Permobil F5VS stander. Yes, you do get fully upright although not exactly straight up and down. I am a few degrees from vertical. It is weight bearing. I got the chair instead of a stander.

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          #5
          I've been using a helium for about 5 years now. I has replaced my tilite as my everyday chair. It's weight bearing, but I'm angled back about 5 degrees and my knees are slightly bent. I don't think you want your legs to be perfectly straight because I'm thinking there's a chance you can hyperextend your legs. It's been extremely useful to have although the construction is nowhere near that of my tilite.

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            #6
            I have the permobil lifestand helium, it is weight bearing. If you are looking for manual standing chair, it is great. I can take some pics tonight and post.
            Ryan

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              #7
              If you want to be upright, that's one thing. I have a standing manual chair, but rarely use it because it is big heavy and cumbersome, but the times when I need it, I am glad to have it.

              Whether something is "properly" weight bearing shouldn't matter to you. There is no known benefit of weight bearing in SCI and there are robust studies to show that it does not increase bone density or decrease fractures relative to nonweight bearing. It was a nice theory, but I suspect true increase in bone strength is due more to the micro-trauma of walking/running/jumping/etc that helps build bones in the first place.

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                #8
                Actually, there is no documented benefit for passive standing for bone density, but there is good documentation of the benefits of standing for spasticity management, contracture prevention, and bowel functioning. Obviously, there are also psychological benefits. So standing is not totally without benefits. Most researchers in this area find that there needs to be sustained active muscle contraction of those muscles attached to the bones in question, combined with weight bearing, to have any benefit. This is been shown in studies that included FES and vibration plate therapy with standing.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                  Actually, there is no documented benefit for passive standing for bone density, but there is good documentation of the benefits of standing for spasticity management, contracture prevention, and bowel functioning. Obviously, there are also psychological benefits. So standing is not totally without benefits. Most researchers in this area find that there needs to be sustained active muscle contraction of those muscles attached to the bones in question, combined with weight bearing, to have any benefit. This is been shown in studies that included FES and vibration plate therapy with standing.

                  (KLD)
                  Agreed, I was just trying to point out that the weight bearing part of the concern shouldn't factor into the decision. If a certain standing chair is sold on the single feature that it is "weight bearing" that's nothing more than a gimmick. Much more important is how it stands, can you operate the mechanism, standing height, ease of storage, etc, etc. All the benefits you listed above are from standing, not from bearing weight.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by lazierdog View Post
                    I've been using a helium for about 5 years now. I has replaced my tilite as my everyday chair. It's weight bearing, but I'm angled back about 5 degrees and my knees are slightly bent. I don't think you want your legs to be perfectly straight because I'm thinking there's a chance you can hyperextend your legs. It's been extremely useful to have although the construction is nowhere near that of my tilite.
                    My son uses a helium too, and I agree about the 5 degree angle, and the knees being slightly bent (and I have no issue with either of those aspects). I did need to add a load of padding to the front leg/knee pad supports, as the one supplied didn't ensure that his legs stayed in the correct place, and they provide little protection to the legs. I also think that the design of the knee pad connection could be a lot better / simpler, although my son doesn't have a problem with it. (I also had a bit of a disagreement with a therapist that said the knee pads should be on the knee itself - I believe they should be just under the knee cap, as I can't believe that pushing directly on a knee cap whilst standing can do any good for the knee cap!).

                    My son also needs an additional chest strap when upright, as the seatbelt is too slim, even when raised. He uses a weight-lifting belt, which is a bit of an inconvenience to put on, but works, and is easy to remove. He's T6 complete.

                    I think the construction quality is very good, but in our case, the chair is used for standing only...it's hardly ever been outside our house.

                    When my son was younger, he used a Levo standing chair, manual chair, but electric standing. He complained about the slow speed for raising/lowering, which is why we went with the manual Helium when he grew out of the Levo. It's definitely faster for raising/lowering, as long as you have the arm strength/dexterity to operate the standing function. Personally I think that the Levo provided a better standing configuration, but that may just have been because my son was younger, and straighter! (He has bad scoliosis, and his hips aren't great either...).
                    Gordon, father of son who became t6 paraplegic at the age of 4 in 2007 as a result of surgery to remove a spinal tumour.

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                      #11
                      I own the permobil F5corpus VS, this chair is definitely weight bearing but you are not standing straight up and this chair is hi tech so be prepared to have many issues with the chair. I love the chair but hate the problems.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Rollingfire311 View Post
                        I own the permobil F5corpus VS, this chair is definitely weight bearing but you are not standing straight up and this chair is hi tech so be prepared to have many issues with the chair. I love the chair but hate the problems.
                        What kind of problems? Is it often something goes wrong with it? I’m looking into getting one now. Main reason is to help me with the spasticity which are really giving me a hard time. And life is more enjoyable after standing on the tilt table, so the standing wheelchair is the answer to my prayers lol

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                          #13
                          We are trying to get one of these chairs for my father (in the approval process). Does anyone know of a good vibration plate that would fit well for use while using the standing feature?

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by rmarks70 View Post
                            We are trying to get one of these chairs for my father (in the approval process). Does anyone know of a good vibration plate that would fit well for use while using the standing feature?
                            Doubtful you will find a vibration plate that you can use with a standing wheelchair...they are too bulky, and heavy. If you want to use vibration therapy, you will do much better to adapt a plate to use with a regular standing frame.

                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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