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    Hospital beds

    My old Invacare adjustable bed went up in smoke today. Head suddenly started to rise then smoke poured out. My wife was in the room so she unplugged it. Don't want to think about what could have happened.
    Time for anew one. A solid base has been suggested insted of the spring base as the old one. I use a LAL mattress

    #2
    I assume you have the Invacare homecare hospital bed frame? Never have liked these, because they don't go very low to the ground, and because of the spring deck you mentioned.

    Either a solid deck or a slat/wire mesh (non-spring) deck will give you better support for your LAL mattress.

    One that we have used a lot is the UCXT from Joerns. It not only has a wire mesh deck, but goes low to the floor making transfer from bed to wheelchair much easier, and it can be ordered with an optional battery back-up so that you don't loose the adjustable features in a power outage:
    http://www.joerns.com/product/8/2466...x?categoryID=8

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
      I assume you have the Invacare homecare hospital bed frame? Never have liked these, because they don't go very low to the ground, and because of the spring deck you mentioned.

      Either a solid deck or a slat/wire mesh (non-spring) deck will give you better support for your LAL mattress.

      One that we have used a lot is the UCXT from Joerns. It not only has a wire mesh deck, but goes low to the floor making transfer from bed to wheelchair much easier, and it can be ordered with an optional battery back-up so that you don't loose the adjustable features in a power outage:
      http://www.joerns.com/product/8/2466...x?categoryID=8

      (KLD)
      Are you leaning towards the UltraCare over the EasyCare mainly for the battery backup? (I'm buying one soon and the EasyCare is quite a bit less expensive.)

      Thanks,
      Dan

      Comment


        #4
        The EasyCare does not go as low to the ground as the UCXT does either.

        (KLD)
        The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

        Comment


          #5
          I use a Joerns EasyCare, roll in low about 7" plus mattress height.

          Comment


            #6
            EasyCare floor to deck minimum is 9". UCXT is 7".

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
              The EasyCare does not go as low to the ground as the UCXT does either.

              (KLD)
              Gotcha. Thanks!

              Comment


                #8
                This is the one i have. http://www.joerns.com/user_area/spec...are%20Spec.pdf

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                  #9
                  my wife and I had bought a used home health store warehouse and we have about 10-15 Invacare hospital beds. If anyone is looking for one for parts or the whole thing shoot me an email way only have the headboard/footboard for about four of those but the rest are frames
                  C4 incomplete since 1985

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The hospital bed I was using stopped working really well and barely moved sometimes. I just got a new one but according to the owner of the facility I live in bed rails are not allowed so I have to be really careful when I'm turned. My insurance doesn't cover the elevate feature of beds so I'm stuck at one height. Fortunately we use a Hoyer lift to get me out of bed sometimes.
                    C-5/6, 7-9-2000
                    Scottsdale, AZ

                    Make the best out of today because yesterday is gone and tomorrow may never come. Nobody knows that better than those of us that have almost died from spinal cord injury.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      In regard to bed rails, I thought a partial rail on each side of the upper part of the bed was allowed and that rails on the entire length of both sides of the bed were unlawful. The idea there is not have a situation where one is "trapped" in bed, a "caged" situation. I believe there is hardware on the bed to accommodate partial rails.
                      Please consider putting in writing a request to the chief administrator clarifying your need for 2 bed rails that you need at the upper portion of the bed, as well as height adjustment. Also I hope you have someone to advocate along with you in a situation like this as it can be dangerous for you. If you are friendly and cozy with the staff it may be difficult for you to make these requests on your own.
                      A paralyzed person in a residential facility is probably not the norm, so you are training and demonstrating to them what is needed to keep someone in your situation safe.
                      I hope you will consider taking some action and if so, let us know as I am curious as to why they refused even partial side rails.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'm oldwheelz's wife, and am afraid of a solid based bed. The reason is that he's had skin issues in the past on his ITs because they are boney and sharp. (Occupational therapists and nurses use the word sharp so I'm not exaggerating) Bob's on a good custom Ride cushion now, so his ITs are looking good, no problem now. BUT can't help worrying about him sitting up in bed. He spends 13-14 hours a day in bed because his skin on one IT in particular is somewhat compromised and we're being cautious. We would like to try a solid base bed but don't want to make a mistake. As long as his bed doesn't lose power there should be no problem, I know. And yet, because my husband has not fit into the mold in the past, with things like Roho cushions, etc. I'm afraid somehow the solid base won't work for him. So I'd like some reassurance if possible. Thanks.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          A solid or other non-springed pan/deck bed gives much more support to a low air loss mattress, but you do still need to have an emergency plan for loss of power to the mattress. Sadly, the only battery powered LAL mattress I have ever seen is no longer available (company went out of business many years ago). A spring pan/deck bed sags too much, and I have seen problems with the springs damaging and puncturing LAL mattresses. The springs don't really provide any pressure relief, so if the LAL mattress goes flat on a spring deck, it might as well be a solid surface for the lack of any pressure reduction it gives.

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            This is great information to have.. Thank you. I'm always worried my bed frame is in its last legs.
                            www.symbolofstrength.com

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by rybread View Post
                              The hospital bed I was using stopped working really well and barely moved sometimes. I just got a new one but according to the owner of the facility I live in bed rails are not allowed so I have to be really careful when I'm turned. My insurance doesn't cover the elevate feature of beds so I'm stuck at one height. Fortunately we use a Hoyer lift to get me out of bed sometimes.
                              Rybread, we have been successful in getting SNFs and assistive living centers to allow the use of a Deluxe Assist Handle on the UCXT bed frame. Not as good as a half-side rail, but because it is classified as a self assist device for turning and not as a rail, it may be acceptable under their guidelines.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                              Comment

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