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rowheels : are there any rowheels users out there ? thoughts? opinions etc.

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    rowheels : are there any rowheels users out there ? thoughts? opinions etc.

    I was at PT today and they had me try a set of rowheels.
    Took 20 minutes to get the basic hang of them, but still pretty squirly.
    I thought they were going to be a bit of a joke, but after trying them am now quite interested, going to give them another go.
    I was thinking I could use them around the house initially where I do 90% of my pushing and swap to outside wheels which are normal.
    or put them on to exercise an hour a day kind of thing.

    Wondering if we have anyone out there who used them regularly, or has tried them for an extended period.

    What was the verdict and thoughts? positive/negative

    http://rowheels.com/

    #2
    they look intersting could they be used as daily wheels
    to alcohol the cause of-and solution to-all of lifes problems [homer simpson]

    Comment


      #3
      I am told they are intended as daily wheels....
      I may not say this out loud, but if I went a head with them I think I would use them as exercise wheels. do a couple of laps of the block with them every day kind of thing.
      but if they worked really well maybe I would use them all the time.
      They are heavy for sure when compared to spinergy wheels.

      Comment


        #4
        The USP of the wheels is that 'pulling muscles' are stronger than 'pushing muscles'. But when you watch the videos the user pulls the wheels from 3 o'clock to 12 'o'clock, and pushes from 12 o'clock to 9 o'clock. The exact opposite of how you propel conventional wheels so really it's a zero sum gain.
        Personally I think they're a bit gimmicky.
        With the Rowheels you are pulling but only for half the stroke, same as you are with conventional wheels?
        eqpt - rigid chair, 2 scooters, crutches/sticks/frames, assistance cat.

        Comment


          #5
          I've only used them once so far for 40 minutes, and like you, thought they'd be a bit of a joke.
          I'm going to try them a few more times, my verdict is still out, but have to admit way more promising than I thought they'd be.
          If I can master them and wheelie with them, I can definitely see them being a great exercise alternative.
          I chair overall width is at it's maximum for my living space, so if they add any width to my chair I'll be screwed.

          Someone somewhere must be using them !!!!





          Originally posted by Night_Owl View Post
          The USP of the wheels is that 'pulling muscles' are stronger than 'pushing muscles'. But when you watch the videos the user pulls the wheels from 3 o'clock to 12 'o'clock, and pushes from 12 o'clock to 9 o'clock. The exact opposite of how you propel conventional wheels so really it's a zero sum gain.
          Personally I think they're a bit gimmicky.
          With the Rowheels you are pulling but only for half the stroke, same as you are with conventional wheels?

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
            I was at PT today and they had me try a set of rowheels.
            Took 20 minutes to get the basic hang of them, but still pretty squirly.
            I thought they were going to be a bit of a joke, but after trying them am now quite interested, going to give them another go.
            I was thinking I could use them around the house initially where I do 90% of my pushing and swap to outside wheels which are normal.
            or put them on to exercise an hour a day kind of thing.

            Wondering if we have anyone out there who used them regularly, or has tried them for an extended period.

            What was the verdict and thoughts? positive/negative

            http://rowheels.com/
            Hi there NW-Will, I know this is a really delayed response but I thought I try to address some of your questions and concerns. Full disclosure, I am the person that developed Rowheels (I am a C-5 quad and longtime member of this forum). I was aware of all the shoulder related issues related to pushing and that's how I ended up coming up with and developing wheels that would eliminate that motion altogether. Anyways, yes these are meant to be every day wheels. There is no gimmick here; the problem is that because everybody gets started using push wheels, pulling seems counterintuitive and many don't want to retrain their mechanics of mobility--Even though the switch can prevent or reduce the risk of future mobility related shoulder injuries. That is the biggest obstacle that we have because the technology works 100%. It eliminates or reduces shoulder impingement related forces that lead to shoulder pain and injury, reduces wrist compression forces that can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome and it improves posture, all while strengthening your upper body. We have many people who are using them as their daily wheels and a many of them have been able to get off pain medication because of the relief from the shoulder pain that they were previously experiencing.

            Regarding popping wheelies, see the video below:
            https://youtu.be/hM8XTgu6N_0

            Have you tried getting a pair for you to demo at home?

            https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...43_1570436.pdf
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nwttgBa3IM&t=1s

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Night_Owl View Post
              The USP of the wheels is that 'pulling muscles' are stronger than 'pushing muscles'. But when you watch the videos the user pulls the wheels from 3 o'clock to 12 'o'clock, and pushes from 12 o'clock to 9 o'clock. The exact opposite of how you propel conventional wheels so really it's a zero sum gain.
              Personally I think they're a bit gimmicky.
              With the Rowheels you are pulling but only for half the stroke, same as you are with conventional wheels?
              I can't say for sure which video you're referring to but the ideal way to use Rowheels is by pulling from 3 or 4 o'clock to 10 or 11 a clock and then bringing your hands back to three or 4 o'clock for the next pull. It sounds like the video you're describing is of someone doing the "pull and push technique", which is only recommended when you're trying to pick up extra speed or maintain momentum moving up a hill or incline/ramp.

              The goal is to use your upper back and shoulder muscles to strengthen and stabilize the shoulder joint. This reduces or eliminates shoulder impingement forces. Actually the harder you pull the more you relieve or eliminate those forces which is the opposite of when you push. This is why physical therapists are constantly trying to train people to use proper form and reduce the amount of effort they use so they can reduce their pushing forces and minimize the damage that pushing generate on your shoulder rotator cuff.

              There are several studies that have shown this. That's the reason why wheelchair athletes train and work out their upper shoulder and scapular retractor muscles as much as they do. See the study below:
              https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/art...43_1570436.pdf
              Last edited by salamero; 21 Nov 2021, 5:25 PM.

              Comment


                #8
                the guy in the demo is a pretty low para. any video of a quad using them. its also a low curb. how do you brake the chair going down a long hill? there use to be a guy on here Chas that had them and liked them. i believe he had MS or some other degenerative muscle problem

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by baldfatdad View Post
                  the guy in the demo is a pretty low para. any video of a quad using them. its also a low curb. how do you brake the chair going down a long hill? there use to be a guy on here Chas that had them and liked them. i believe he had MS or some other degenerative muscle problem
                  So there are two versions of RoWheels; the HX which is a high gear version that is fast and responsive (meant for users with good upper body function) and the LX which is a low gear version that provides 25% mechanical advantage and is ideal for people with reduced upper body strength or weakness-- these are better suited for quads. See video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMB4sQzz1y0

                  With regards to breaking when you're going downhill, It much much safer and easier with Rowheels because the handrim is spinning towards you as you're going down so all you have to do is squeeze/push inwards on the handrims to slow down/brakes and at the same time it pushes you back up against your backrest --- the opposite of what happens when you're on a push-based chair where the handrim is spinning away from you and when you try to break it yanks you forward and out of your seat!

                  Comment

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