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  • Need a new manual chair

    I am requesting help on purchasing a new manual chair. I am currently using a cheep manual chair that was provided to me by the insurance company. It is OK at home but difficult to use outside. It will not go straight. I am often pushing with one hand and breaking with the other just to go straight. (Does this happen with good/expensive chairs? Chairs that might cost $1500 to 3000? I think that is my price range)

    Also, I cannot find a dealer in my area. Should I risk purchasing a chair online? I believe I want a lightweight or ultra-lightweight rigid chair, that I can fit into the trunk of my car.

    I am still able to walk, but walking increases my pain level quite a bit. I would like to be able to get around outside without the effort needed with my cheep chair. Thanks in advance.

    Den

  • #2
    I highly recommend Tilite Aero Z because it's lightweight and it's mono tube so if one day, you need to do a in car transfer you don't hit your chin.
    My second recommendation is Quickie GP but please stay away from Quickie's other products. I own Quickie 2, Quickie full freestyle(powerchair) and Quickie TI(which is a titanium version of GP).
    Quickie TI is my favourite wheelchair by far due to it low maintenance and high performance. My quickie 2 was always under maintenance.

    Canucks

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    • #3
      I agree wholeheartedly with Canucks' AeroZ recommendation. An AeroZ served me great for five+ years (it's now the backup to my TR).

      The biggest challenge to buying on line is getting your measurements right. Is there a seating clinic in your area that could measure you?

      Bike-on.com is known for it customer service; several CCC members work for them: fuentejps and stephen212. They might be very helpful
      Chas
      TiLite TR3
      Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
      I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

      "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
      <
      UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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      • #4
        I completely agree with Canucks and chasmengr. I have a Tilite AERO Z and it has been great- never any problems (but I clean out the gunk and hair on the joints in the front castor tires a few times a year- that keeps it going straight. Also, you should try that on the chair you have now if you haven't already). In regards to fitting, there are sooo many different measurements that can completely throw off the balance of a chair (I know from experience)- definitely go have the chair fitted/measured by a professional!! Remember, this thing is your legs- make sure it is as perfect as you can get it- don't skimp on it! A well fitted chair makes a world of difference!

        On a more general note- rigid chairs are always more sturdy and last longer than foldable so if you can get away with a rigid-DO IT! And from what I have heard from other paras, Tilite is the best brand- it lasts the longest with the fewest problems.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Den Den View Post
          I am requesting help on purchasing a new manual chair. I am currently using a cheep manual chair that was provided to me by the insurance company. It is OK at home but difficult to use outside. It will not go straight. I am often pushing with one hand and breaking with the other just to go straight. (Does this happen with good/expensive chairs? Chairs that might cost $1500 to 3000? I think that is my price range)

          Also, I cannot find a dealer in my area. Should I risk purchasing a chair online? I believe I want a lightweight or ultra-lightweight rigid chair, that I can fit into the trunk of my car.

          I am still able to walk, but walking increases my pain level quite a bit. I would like to be able to get around outside without the effort needed with my cheep chair. Thanks in advance.

          Den
          If it does not handle cross fall then that is because your centre of gravity is too far forwards. If you move the drive wheels forwards to make the chair more tippy it will handle cross fall better but will be harder to go uphill. This is a compromise.

          See "The Effect of Footway Crossfall Gradient on Wheelchair Accessibility", Catherine Holloway,
          http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/1310252/1/1310252.pdf

          You also want a squeeze angle of about 80deg between seat and backrest to eliminate shear force and the tendency to slide out of the chair. This requires dump where the front of the seat is higher than the back. This will ensure that fall back into the chair rather than slide out or slump forwards.

          The chair should have a mounting plate for the drive wheels with a number of holes to move the plate and/or wheels.
          http://zagam.net/

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