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    compression stockings

    What brand compression stockings are you using now, if you have a lot of edema? Where do you buy them?

    My Dad wears compression stockings (pressure 20-30mmHg) every day since he had a blood clot / reconstructive surgery on his legs after his injury. He used to use Jobst in the beginning, but then had several pairs of stockings that had poor pressure gradients or that tore too easily. So he moved to Sigvaris. Unfortunately Sigvaris recently stopped selling the stocking that worked best for him, so we are searching again.

    He is tall, but has narrow calves, so he needs a stocking manufacturer that has "tall" sizes. He has some Juzos, but they don't have a great pressure gradient and aren't as durable as Sigvaris was.

    There are lots of "new" styles that have different proportions of cotton/polyester instead of the older nylon/spandex versions. The new styles look more casual/sporty and less like medical compression stockings, but they don't work as well for my Dad.

    #2
    Truform Medical Weight 20-30mmhg Knee Lenght. I know they have extra wide and short but don't know about tall. I started out many years ago after a leg ulcer. I was at 26 or 27 inches around calf then and had be ordered from pharmacy. They worked cause sizing gradually decreased to now I wear a Medium for width. I can get them at local Walmart off and on for a bit less than $20/pair. They run out if ask lady that does ordering for that section with bar code off my last box she, so far orders them.
    Here is Tryform site:
    http://www.truform.com/medical-wear#20-30-mmhg
    Truform can be found online shops but their prices vary.

    Otherwise when Walmart quit carrying for awhile I ordered from Ames Walker. I used their brand of Medical Weight Knee high 20-30mmHg, they cost a bit more than Truform from Walmart but but a friend recommended them and I found them to do good job. Back when I got from them if you ordered several pair at time then got discount:
    https://www.ameswalker.com/compressi...20-30-mmhg.asp
    You might check their site out frist they carry several brands besides their own and maybe check ot their sizing charts they may help you narrow down a brand that will work better for him.
    "Good Luck!"

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      #3
      I use tubigrips cut to length and doubled to increase pressure. I have short fat calves and was getting deep purple rings and bruising from all the commercial compression hose I tried - hematologist suggested them and I like them.

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        #4
        I order from Discount Surgical Stockings http://www.discountsurgical.com/ The house brand works great for me.

        "Freedom is what you do with what's been done to you. . ."
        --J.P. Sartre

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          #5
          Footsmart.com

          http://www.footsmart.com/?SRCCODE=PA...FcOLswodNBACxQ

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            #6
            Appreciate the recs.

            He saw his doctor today and may need to move up to 30-40mmHg. Anyone using stockings this high pressure? I'm a bit worried about developing pressure sores on his toes.

            It doesn't look like the brands mentioned have TALL sizes. My Dad has really long legs/big feet, but his legs are very skinny. Really hard to size.

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              #7
              this is perhaps a little late now... AndI can't help with sizing as in the UK I am measured by my NHS' orthotics/appliances team. But I have to use thigh-high grade 3s, which are around 35mmHg, and I just wanted to say that your doc should be able to (or refer you to someone who can) use various assessment tools/scales to make sure the high compression stockings are right for him. They should check the ankle brachial pressure to make sure there's no arterial insufficiency, and here in the UK we have the Waterlow Assessment - there will be a USA equivalent if it's not the same one - which can be used to gauge his risk of developing pressure sores. Personally I have the most trouble with these stockings in Winter - the stockings seem to exacerbate any effect the cold has on my feet (perhaps due to poor circulation?).
              I have Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (hypermobile type), Dysautonomia, Osteoarthritis, & deformities in my feet.. I'm also Autistic.

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                #8
                HIH have you tried looking into medical leg wear? They are more durable and and more exact on the compression.

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                  #9
                  Not sure what you mean by medical leg wear? Are you referring to a specific brand?

                  Update....

                  So far, our best results have been with the classic style Jobst 30-40mmHg sized Medium Tall. They have a generous toe box and have a decent fabric content (highest spandex). We are still less happy with the new fabric content of the classic style Sigvaris, but have had the best luck for his large feet/long legs with lower leg atrophy with the size Small Long in 30-40mmHg. Amazingly they are still big enough for his feet, and don't crush his toes too much, but they are hard to put on and take off. We are also going to try a thigh high version of the Sigvaris, which may be hard to get on/off.

                  But none of these have enough compression in the lower leg, especially for the bad days.

                  So his physiatrist gave him a script for "lymphedema therapy" and he will see physical therapists about this. The techniques they use can be helpful for venous related edema (which he has due to a prior DVT, and IVC filter, and his paraplegia), and he also has some lymphedema related to a flap reconstruction of one of his legs that makes one leg worse than the other. After he works with the therapists for awhile, he will have some custom compression stockings made. These are not cheap, but I think we may have to try them at this point. We've heard a less expensive option is a pair of stockings that closes with velcro. He may also try using one of the pneumatic compression devices in the home, if when he tries them with the physical therapists they appear beneficial. We will look online/Craig's list etc.. to see if we can pick up one for lower cost.

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                    #10
                    Ok by everything you explained he definitely custom. By what you told me bring up a Farrow wrap with your therapist just to see what they say. These can be adjusted independently. Good luck with your search. Medical leg wear is not a specific brand most suppliers carry them good luck!

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by nmireles View Post
                      Ok by everything you explained he definitely custom. By what you told me bring up a Farrow wrap with your therapist just to see what they say. These can be adjusted independently. Good luck with your search. Medical leg wear is not a specific brand most suppliers carry them good luck!

                      This is a late follow-up but my Dad did try the Farrow wrap and they are fantastic! This is the best solution we have found for my Dad. They are perfect for people who have fluctuating edema - some days bad, some days better. And they are the best solution we have found if you are tall like my Dad but have very narrow calves due to atrophy.

                      They take a little practice to learn how to apply yourself, but they consist of velcro straps that adjust to whatever size your leg is that day when you put them on. They work well. The down side is that they are bulky, so if you wear AFOs like my father, you may have trouble fitting your legs into your AFOs with the thick Farrow wraps on. They also only come in one color..... a sickly tan color.

                      Here's a link to the ones my Dad uses.

                      http://www.compressionguru.com/farrow-basic-legpiece

                      This comes with a compression "sock" liner that you put on first that has a bit of foot compression, and then you put on the velcro wrap on the lower leg. There is a separate velcro foot piece sold separately, but that didn't work for us. It caused concerning pressure marks. I recommend getting the leg piece alone, and try it using with just the included liner sock. It is probably enough.

                      My Dad's edema is well controlled now. He alternates between the Farrow wraps and regular compression stockings. We never had custom stockings made. This is cheaper. He bought a bunch of extra sock liners for the Farrow wraps that he washes after each wear, and washes the wrap itself after 5-6 wears (puts in a delicates bag, and washes in the washer on gentle cycle with a mild laundry detergent - Costco free and clear). He has two pairs of Farrow wraps, and 8 pairs of the sock liners he bought separately.

                      I also recommend Compressionguru for ordering them. They were a really great company. Easy shipping and returns, as we were trying different types/sizes. Also did a price adjustment for us. Also very communicative by phone and by email. Really a pleasure. Which happens rarely these days, for us....

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                        #12
                        I had custom stockings made through Sigvaris. $340 a pair (Canada) which is ridiculous. Insurance is the only thing that saves me.

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                          #13
                          That's an incredibly cheap price for custom stockings. They are more expensive in the US. And in the US, many (most?) insurance companies do not cover them. Medicare - the National health insurance plan that serves seniors and those on disability - does not cover them for the types of edema those with SCI suffer from.

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                            #14
                            http://mediusa.com/portfolio-item/juxtafit-essentials/

                            Been using these for about 3 years. Way better than TED hose which I used for previous 25 or so years.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by Lone Beagle View Post
                              http://mediusa.com/portfolio-item/juxtafit-essentials/

                              Been using these for about 3 years. Way better than TED hose which I used for previous 25 or so years.

                              Those are excellent. My father also has a pair of these that he wears on his upper leg when his edema is severe. He wears them in combination with his Farrow wraps on the lower leg. They also have the adjustable velcro straps so you can mold them to your shape. His physical therapist recommended them.

                              Do you use those on your lower leg, and upper leg?

                              They required a little practice to learn how to apply them correctly, and are a little challenging for my Dad to put on his upper leg without assistance.

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