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Can anyone identify this Freedom Ryder hand cycle for me?

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  • Can anyone identify this Freedom Ryder hand cycle for me?

    Hey everyone,
    I came across this hand cycle for sale locally, and ended up buying it for $300. I don't know anything about it except that it's a Freedom Ryder. I don't know if I got a good deal, or just bought a heap of ancient junk that I won't be able to resell, should I end up not liking it. Regardless, I've always wanted to try hand cycling, so I'm excited to own one. Anyways, the Freedom Ryder website did not have any info on it. No clue how to even work the gear shifter on the thing. Are the gears, shifters, chain and all that inter-changable with bike parts? If not, are parts available somewhere if I need repairs?
    I appreciate any insight!
    Thanks,
    Brian

    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02...ew?usp=sharing
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02...ew?usp=sharing
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B02...ew?usp=sharing

  • #2
    Do the shifters not work? fix it or take to a bike shop and have them look at it. That's gotta be an old school lean to steer? That's like 80's bike shifters, but looks to have Phil Wood hubs($$). For $300, ride the crap out of it, probably not much different than a new style one.

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    • #3
      I'd just email Mike at Freedom Ryder and ask him...
      Any decent bike shop should be able to repair and maintain it and even show you how the shifting works.

      Looks quite decent to me. If you look at the rear derailleur (the thing next to the front wheel but the gear cluster that the chain runs through. It had two small wheels in it), what does it say?
      T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jschism View Post
        Do the shifters not work? fix it or take to a bike shop and have them look at it. That's gotta be an old school lean to steer? That's like 80's bike shifters, but looks to have Phil Wood hubs($$). For $300, ride the crap out of it, probably not much different than a new style one.
        The shifters definitely work, I just don't understand how to know which gear is which, or when to shift which one. The bike seems to be in great condition, I was just asking in the event that I did have problems, if I could take it to a bike shop. And yes, it's a lean to steer - I took it out for a quick jaunt down the street with the kids, and the steering took some practice but is pretty intuitive. It was really fun being on a bike after 29 years in the slow lane!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mize View Post
          I'd just email Mike at Freedom Ryder and ask him...
          Any decent bike shop should be able to repair and maintain it and even show you how the shifting works.

          Looks quite decent to me. If you look at the rear derailleur (the thing next to the front wheel but the gear cluster that the chain runs through. It had two small wheels in it), what does it say?
          Thanks for the tip, I'll see about taking it into a bike shop later in the week. The derailleur says 'shimano' on it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by taziar View Post
            Thanks for the tip, I'll see about taking it into a bike shop later in the week. The derailleur says 'shimano' on it.
            Shimano is the largest producer of quality components. They have several different lines with different names depending upon the year. Probably it's one of their mountain bike groups. Deore is probably the most popular. Either way it should be decent stuff at the very least.
            T3 complete since Sept 2015.

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            • #7
              looks like you got a good deal. If you have not ridden bikes much in your life the smallest chain ring up top at the cranks will be your easiest pedaling and depending on what shape you are in you may want to start off on the smallest chain ring to get going then as you get going change the bottom gears down at the wheel to the smaller ones as you gain speed when the pedaling gets really easy you can change to the next biggest chain ring up top and so on A general rule of thumb is the small chain ring for getting started the middle one for cruising and the biggest one for increasing your speed going down hill or on a flat surface and you have got your bike up to a good speed. I am not saying this is hard fast rule but general guide lines you will figure it out as you ride more and encounter different terrains. You will get to where you know when you are at a certain speed and a hill is coming up if you need to shift to a smaller chain ring up top to take the hill or if you can just put it in the lowest gear down at the bottom to take the hill and not have to use a different chain ring. The bike looks like it is from the late 80s or early 90s and it looks to be in great shape and a great way for you to get into handcycling without spending a ton of money and the lean steer does take some getting used to but if you can do the lean steer it is a blast and I think the best. There may be a small switch on the steering damper that will change how loose or tight the steering is. The guys at Freedom Ryder can tell you if it does and where it is.

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              • #8
                I have this bike. I bought it back in 1994 and still ride it almost every day to work. 1400 miles so far this year. It's my life. I'm a t4.

                PM me and we can set up a phone call. I can tell you everything you need to know.
                Last edited by brian; 08-08-2016, 02:00 AM.

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                • #9
                  As I recall the old ones had an adjustment close to under the seat allowing you to tighten/loosen the lean steer. The lean steer function requires a learning curve, suggest you first ride in an empty parking lot with an AB person accompanying you. Once you learn to use lean steer it's lots of fun.

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                  • #10
                    Can't believe you got this bike for only $300!
                    I used a Freedom Ryder for several years and loved it. The lean steer was great for me and often it just required a gentle tilt of my head/shoulders to begin a turn. Allow room for a wide area if you need to turn completely around.
                    Hope you will get a good quality helmet. I used a wide stretchable belt around my hip area as I have poor balance. Later on, as aging set in, I used a small step-stool to transfer to, then up into my chair.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by brian View Post
                      I have this bike. I bought it back in 1994 and still ride it almost every day to work. 1400 miles so far this year. It's my life. I'm a t4.

                      PM me and we can set up a phone call. I can tell you everything you need to know.
                      PM Sent!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by triumph View Post
                        Can't believe you got this bike for only $300!
                        I bought it from a guy who bought it used, then rode it just once. He found it too difficult for his level of ability. Sat in his garage for years before he put it on OfferUp for $399. Really nice guy, we talked for maybe 45 minutes about wheelchair war stories. When it came time to pay, he said he said I could have it for $300.

                        Originally posted by triumph View Post
                        I used a Freedom Ryder for several years and loved it. The lean steer was great for me and often it just required a gentle tilt of my head/shoulders to begin a turn. Allow room for a wide area if you need to turn completely around.
                        I got the hang of the steering very quickly. Definitely has a huge turning radius - not sure if that's indicative of all hand cycles or just lean steers, or just this one model, but it does take some space to do a u-turn!

                        Originally posted by triumph View Post
                        Hope you will get a good quality helmet. I used a wide stretchable belt around my hip area as I have poor balance. Later on, as aging set in, I used a small step-stool to transfer to, then up into my chair.
                        I'm an L-3 incomplete, so I thankfully have very good balance. I hear you on the helmet - our local fire department has a free helmet program for residents, so I already went over and got fitted with one. I've have no interest in complicating my life with a TBI.

                        Thanks for the encouraging words - I'm feeling good about the purchase now, for sure!
                        Last edited by taziar; 08-08-2016, 04:07 PM.

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                        • #13
                          It's a F/R Classic. Early lean steer and one of the easiest bikes to work on. Shifters are no big deal to adjust. They used Shimano back then. I owned the third F/R made. Back then, they were made in Texas.

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