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    Portable Hydraulic Lift

    Anyone have any suggestions for a portable hydraulic, or could be battery I guess, lift. It would be used to take with me to medical appts where the Dr. won't perform from chair. Also to be used for vacationing.

    Thanks......

    #2
    Your physician is required under the ADA to provide you with the same exam they would someone who can transfer to an exam table...either by providing a lift themselves, or an otherwise accessible exam table.

    As far as a good lift for travel, I can recommend the Molift Smart or the Hoyer Advance. Both fold compactly, and are easy to stow in a trunk. Both are battery powered as well.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
      Your physician is required under the ADA to provide you with the same exam they would someone who can transfer to an exam table...either by providing a lift themselves, or an otherwise accessible exam table.

      As far as a good lift for travel, I can recommend the Molift Smart or the Hoyer Advance. Both fold compactly, and are easy to stow in a trunk. Both are battery powered as well.

      (KLD)
      I have a Hoyer Advance. Works great and like KLD said easy to stow.

      Comment


        #4
        Thanks KDL and Hacknsack44 for your replies - I will definitely be checking them out to see which will fit my needs.

        KDL - if my Dr. office doesn't have a lift or "safe" way to get me on the table, what would be a procedure for me to follow for them to get something. I ask, because when I went to the GYN in 2011 they had to have people physically lift me to the exam table. Not very safe, more so because I am not a light weight. Therefore, I have not been back since then and I'm sure they haven't changed anything either....

        Comment


          #5
          First you have to be your own advocate. Be sure you have a copy of the ADA standards for health care facilities (including provider offices) and you have reviewed it. Ask to speak to your provider about their responsibility to comply with these standards. Encourage them to take the initiative to advocate with their group or facility, or take on the responsibility to get their practice location into compliance. They can often get consultation from the local Independent Living Center staff. Tell them you would like to work with them on this, rather than have to file a formal complaint with the DOJ, but that you will do so if necessary. Physicians can be fined and made to make such changes if they get a DOJ judgment against them based on your complaint.

          http://www.ada.gov/medcare_mobility_ta/medcare_ta.htm

          http://dredf.org/legal-advocacy/laws...dical-offices/

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            I have not been to the dentist in many years suffered a wound trying to transfer back to my chair. Its hard to line up people to go with you but i suppose ultimately I will have to. I have found most Dr. office will have one bed wheelchair height even if it is in ER if you ask for it, however I have not found a Dentist who is interested in helping they just say bring your own help. Having said that I am sure there are DR's offices that are uncooperative as well.

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              #7
              Hi pete4sake, I last went to the dentist in 2011 . They did my cleaning from my chair. At the time I thought it was great, other then getting a stiff neck. However, I used to get an appointment reminder every six months. Notice I said "used". Yup that's right I haven't gotten one!!!! Its really sad, but like KLD said, I need to be my own advocate!!
              Last edited by Treeza04; 15 Mar 2016, 11:09 AM.

              Comment


                #8
                Sad to say but I feel medical facilities are often the worst to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act. When I brought up this exam table issue with the medical center I use, I was thereafter seen in the chiropractor's office which has a narrow table that adjusts to the level of my wheelchair, enabling me to do a sliding board transfer. This is a tiny room and allowed very little space for the doctor and nurse to move around.
                A few weeks ago my spouse, T10 SCI went to transfer to a table that did lower, at a urology practice, and half of the table fell to the floor in the midst of his transfer. He then quit the visit and said he would not be back.
                I agree it would help us all if you would talk to your doctor. In addition if you must use them ask to see the chiropractor's table as it may work for you.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I've used my Liko Light for vacation, but it would not lift high enough for exam tables. I go to the Northeast Ohio regional spinal cord injury system. It used to be a model system, but I don't believe that it is any longer. I don't think they have a wheelchair level exam table in the entire place. If I work at it and have a cooperative Dr. I can usually arrange to have a lift for most appointments, but my internist doesn't even have access to one.

                  As for my dentist, I am fortunate to have a power wheelchair with tilt. My dentist is fine with working in the chair.
                  Tom

                  "Blessed are the pessimists, for they hath made backups." Exasperated 20:12

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                    #10
                    Hi triumph - thanks for your reply. I agree its sad about the medical community being the worst to comply...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I would encourage all of you to advocate for yourself for your rights to access wherever you go for health care services. Remember there are no ADA "police". The ADA is enforced, as by all civil rights laws, by citizens insisting upon their rights being met with the service provider and business owner, and then, if necessary, filing an official complaint with the DOJ (or other agency depending upon the section of the ADA in question). Advocating for yourself also helps other people with disabilities who are trying to access these same services.

                      For hospitals or large healthcare organizations, I would suggest talking to the patient advocate and possibly the risk management department, as the latter will have to address any legal issues brought about by a formal DOJ investigation, so would most likely want to intervene to satisfy your access needs rather than have to deal with the DOJ (and a possible fine).

                      Something you can also use in your battle for these is that many states have also passed "Safe Patient Handling and Movement" laws for protection of healthcare workers from injuries incurred from manual lifting, requiring that health care facilities obtain mechanical lifts and other equipment for such tasks. The VA has had such rules in place for its facilities since 2008. Facilities that don't have such equipment, train staff in its use, and prohibit unsafe manual lifting may be in violation of the law.

                      At our hospital we have ceiling track lifts over every inpatient bed, and in many of our outpatient clinic areas, radiology, nuclear medicine, etc. In those areas without a ceiling track lift, we have access to mobile lifts. New clinic furniture is being purchased that includes lower exam tables as well. In our SCI outpatient clinic, we have a hospital beds rather than exam tables, which make exams easier, transfers easier, and are kinder to our patients' skin. Our GU clinic has a urology procedures and urodynamics tables that also go closer to the floor for transfers, or they can use their ceiling track lift to put someone onto a gurney, then slide them over to the exam table.

                      (KLD)
                      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        We have a Sunrise Hydraulic lift that we used to transfer Ry from his power chair to a pick up truck that had a chair carrier. We used it at PT appointments in the early days before he could transfer safely. We used it around the house. It is something that I was able to store int he bed of the truck (I even did it with a Saturn L200 and a transport chair).

                        We have since gotten a power chair friendly van and an over the bed lift for when it is needed. He is now able to transfer to the dentist chair but I have to drive the chair. Medical visits are a challenge but I talk to them in advance. The worst has been bone density tests as there is no rrom for the lift and the table is too high for him to safely transfer. We need serious muscle to assist in that transfer. Ry has leg strength but no ballance so he can help but needs help. He is also full sized at 6 feet and 180 pounds so it is nore than I can do alone.--eak
                        Elizabeth A. Kephart, PHR
                        mom/caregiver to Ryan-age 21
                        Incomplete C-2 with TBI since 3/09

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                          #13
                          I bought a used Molift 150 from ebay. It has been great for travel, as it folds up nicely. I bought the travel case for it.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Those in AZ have access to this workshop on ADA healthcare accessibility regulations this coming Tuesday. Too bad they are not doing it as a webinar that those living more distant could attend:

                            https://www.eventbrite.com/e/you-hav...ts-23115819037

                            Arizona Center for Disability Law
                            Tuesday, March 22, 2016
                            The Arizona Center for Disability Law in collaboration with Ability360 will be conducting training for persons with disabilities to answer these questions and more. This free training will provide information on the Americans with Disabilities Act and how it applies to healthcare providers. The training will also provide information about legal requirements for accessible healthcare equipment (exam tables, weighing scales, x-ray machines, etc.). In addition, the training will provide strategies for obtaining accessibility and reasonable accommodations from your health care providers.
                            The Arizona Center for Disability Law in collaboration with Ability360 will be conducting training for persons with disabilities to answer these questions and more. This free training will provide information on the Americans with Disabilities Act and how it applies to healthcare providers. The training will also provide information about legal requirements for accessible healthcare equipment (exam tables, weighing scales, x-ray machines, etc.). In addition, the training will provide strategies for obtaining accessibility and reasonable accommodations from your health care providers.


                            (KLD)
                            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                            Comment

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