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    #16
    Remember that you need to come to a standing position after applying leg braces too. This takes a LOT of upper body strength. How strong are your triceps, if any? You also would have to be able to grip onto a set of parallel bars or crutches, although possibly a forearm platform walker could be used, but most likely you would need one or more people to assist you into position like this.

    A standing frame or glider can help get you up into an upright position, unlike braces. You could also consider the use of a standing wheelchair or something like these if you have the funds to purchase, although not sure how functional they are for someone with tetraplegia vs. paraplegia. Insurances rarely cover them:

    http://www.matiarobotics.com/

    Here are braces that are used for standing and VERY limited ambulation for people with high paraplegia. Certainly not functional, and used primarily for therapy and exercise:





    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      #17
      I have EXACTLY the RGO shown in KLD's picture. I'm a T-5 complete and use them mostly for standing and exercise. They are hard to get into and it takes a fair amount of time getting used to them. When I first got them it took me over a week to even try and "walk" with them. I wear them just about every day for their therapeutic and psychological value

      I talked to my physiatrist about them first and was then evaluated by a PT who helped in determining what would work best. After the evaluation I got a prescription and went to an orthotist for further evaluation and casting. My insurance fully paid for them.

      I find that it takes a sincere and determined commitment to make them work. I like them for the exercise and the fact that I can stand in them. In fact, the back brace helps with my trunk weakness and scoliosis. I also have noticed that they seem to help with reducing my spasms. I suspect that having my legs stretched and moving has something to do with it.

      Probably the best course of action is to discuss it with your doctor.

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        #18
        you wouldnt go out in these would you? if you wouldnt then whats the point in going through all that and it being abit unsafe when you could just use a standing frame mobile version? i can imagine trying to "walk" in one of those and i dont think it would go as well as i have it in my head, it would be hard and im pretty confident in things i do and being able to hold my own weight etc.

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          #19
          You can Google leg braces, orthotics companies, etc. to see pictures of braces. I have done this in regard to TLSOs (Thoracic Lumbar Sacral Orthotic, which I must wear due to scoliosis and paralysis).

          I believe leg braces are now much lighter, being made of plastic and composites. When young, back in the Stone Age, I wore metal braces so I could stand and drag myself up two steps onto my school bus, as this skill was the only way I could attend school (for the handicapped!). If one could not get on the bus independently, they were put on home instruction. My arms were very strong, but it was a major workout to get on the bus.
          Braces are so expensive! Yes, you would need a doctor's prescription for orthotics, and probably physical therapist to run you through parallel bars to get used to them. In short, yeah, you can do it, but there are so many other pursuits in life that might be more rewarding.

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            #20
            Absolutely what everyone is saying here. It take a hell of a lot of strength, practice and mental determination. Whoever you work with make sure your goal and what they would be trying for you to achieve ARE THE SAME.

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              #21
              Originally posted by rlmtrhmiles View Post
              Whoever you work with make sure your goal and what they would be trying for you to achieve ARE THE SAME.
              Amen to that. I can't even count the times I've thought I was communicating clearly about my goals, capacities, etc. - writing things out, reworking sentences to make them as transparent as possible, taking a witness with me to appointments - only to end up with opposite results in critical areas. What you say, and what people hear, can be shockingly different - even when both of you have the same objective (therapeutic benefit), from different perspectives. At this point, I ask my health care professionals to repeat back to me what I've said, in their own words - we can refine from there.
              MS with cervical and thoracic cord lesions

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                #22
                Bracing that includes the lower trunk, hip, knee, and ankle is abbreviated LKAFO. You can do a search using that term. Those that include only the knee, and ankle (usually starting just at the hip) are called KAFOs.

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Bonnette View Post
                  Amen to that. I can't even count the times I've thought I was communicating clearly about my goals, capacities, etc. - writing things out, reworking sentences to make them as transparent as possible, taking a witness with me to appointments - only to end up with opposite results in critical areas. What you say, and what people hear, can be shockingly different - even when both of you have the same objective (therapeutic benefit), from different perspectives. At this point, I ask my health care professionals to repeat back to me what I've said, in their own words - we can refine from there.
                  That is SO true!!

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                    #24
                    Along the same thought as the OP. Instead of using a stander could a person use a sling and a ceiling lift? I'm thinking of those gait training slings that attach to ceiling lifts. Maybe use knee immobilizers or have live assist similar to how the TheraStride is used for walking in the NRN?

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                      #25
                      Putting them on and taking off, YES, another HUGE piece. Conceptually you can see standing. The getting those braces on and then all of the "pieces" your body must do, is grossly different. Watching a video or other electronic, may give you ideas, do NOT rely on what you see, you can do. I am not saying this that it is impossible. It is just extremely different than what you are seeing. Your trunk needs to be tucked in as if uninjured. AND really need be careful you do not unexpectedly fall, hurt or anything else not thinking of that sets you backward. I wear foot/ankle fixed braces in bed each night. It helps foot drop and fluid buildup. About 1 year ago, 1 fell off bed while I was sleeping. Snapped my femur. Was in surgery next day for rods in leg. I sill have no idea how that happened.

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                        #26
                        I've been a T11/12 incomplete since birth I used KAFO's or versions of those from the time I was 3 or 4 until I was 16th, even with somewhat functioning quads I never was a functional walker and honestly the energy you have to expel and then not being really functional at any sort of activity it just isn't worth. I'm about 20 times more functional in daily activities in my chair then I ever was walking. The only thing miss is being able to stand. In my opinion unless you can justify them for just therapy you're more or less throwing money down the toilet. Unless they are a really low injury and or are super incomplete I would say 95% of the people who have braces probably abandon them to the closest after a year or two. At least that's what I've seen over the years.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by canuck View Post
                          I've been a T11/12 incomplete since birth I used KAFO's or versions of those from the time I was 3 or 4 until I was 16th, even with somewhat functioning quads I never was a functional walker and honestly the energy you have to expel and then not being really functional at any sort of activity it just isn't worth. I'm about 20 times more functional in daily activities in my chair then I ever was walking. The only thing miss is being able to stand. In my opinion unless you can justify them for just therapy you're more or less throwing money down the toilet. Unless they are a really low injury and or are super incomplete I would say 95% of the people who have braces probably abandon them to the closest after a year or two. At least that's what I've seen over the years.
                          Agree 100%, you will soon abandon braces, they are totally not functional for almost all paras and every quad. You may want to consider a standing chair that may enhance circulation and pressure shifts.

                          Back in medieval days when I was in rehab they allowed extra rehab time for paras who wanted to "walk". This was in an era when health care had a heart. I learned quickly that you could not functionally climb stairs and that walking down the halls of a tiled rehab center floor was vastly different than going outside and ambulating on course, cambered concrete. My braces lived a decade or two under my bed post rehab. I married a chair user, her braces joined mine there. When two of our nieces were preteens spending an overnight decades later they spotted the braces and insisted we stand. That was the last time we stood. Braces for sci folks are a tremendous waste of effort and walking on braces a destroyer of shoulders.

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