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World's Lightest Wheelchair Wheels

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    #16
    Could be in for a surprise on the pricing as they are located in Europe so I don't think that pricing is in U.S. Dollars.

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      #17
      Oddity: I was an elite cyclist before my accident so wheel weight was something I've experimented much with. Most competetive cyclists love to do that since it affects the cycling performance a lot.

      You're absolutely right about the importance of weight distribution. The weight of the rim is definitely more important than the hub weight. The description on the TiArrow site says that they got the world's lightest aluminum rim in this wheel, which is very impressive considering the flora of bicycle rims out there. So should be very good distribution wise.

      When it comes to everyday wheelchair usage it's all about acceleration. For the majority of people most pushing is done indoors which means lots of starts and stops. Outdoors this effect is most noticable when you're going uphill. Regarding the idea that a greater amount of inertia would be something good (it's called the flywheel effect) that's mostly just true when you do declines. But as soon as you get to a incline where it gets a little bit harder it's always better with lightness to conquer gravity.

      In short - unless you're only going downhill with your wheelchair you should always strive against having as light wheels as possible.

      This site has a lot of formulas to count for different scenarios and calculate to see the importance of wheel weight. It's a lot of fun if you're as geeky as me regarding these things...
      http://www.analyticcycling.com/

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        #18
        Originally posted by canuck View Post
        Could be in for a surprise on the pricing as they are located in Europe so I don't think that pricing is in U.S. Dollars.
        I think it is U.S. Dollars if you click on the american flag in the top on the site. The prices gets different and currency symbols changes if you choose GB or EU.

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          #19
          That is a cool site! I was heavy in to 2-wheeled sports prior to my injury as well, although of the motored variety. I was a "never gonna make it Valentino Rossi wanna-be"! Yes, hopefully their claims of being the lightest are actually in the rim itself and not mostly on account of the carbon fiber hub.

          re: the flywheel effect, that comes into play on the flats, too, where it helps maintain more forward velocity between push strokes. But, I think it's true we are always either decelerating or accelerating, never actually maintaining a truely steady velocity, in absolute terms. And at the price I think these wheels are a great addition to the market. I admit to having a bit of a grudge against the "weight is the priority" manufacturer marketing hype because a lot of it is down right misleading. Such is the way of marketing in general, I reckon!

          Originally posted by 1029xx View Post
          Oddity: I was an elite cyclist before my accident so wheel weight was something I've experimented much with. Most competetive cyclists love to do that since it affects the cycling performance a lot.

          You're absolutely right about the importance of weight distribution. The weight of the rim is definitely more important than the hub weight. The description on the TiArrow site says that they got the world's lightest aluminum rim in this wheel, which is very impressive considering the flora of bicycle rims out there. So should be very good distribution wise.

          When it comes to everyday wheelchair usage it's all about acceleration. For the majority of people most pushing is done indoors which means lots of starts and stops. Outdoors this effect is most noticable when you're going uphill. Regarding the idea that a greater amount of inertia would be something good (it's called the flywheel effect) that's mostly just true when you do declines. But as soon as you get to a incline where it gets a little bit harder it's always better with lightness to conquer gravity.

          In short - unless you're only going downhill with your wheelchair you should always strive against having as light wheels as possible.

          This site has a lot of formulas to count for different scenarios and calculate to see the importance of wheel weight. It's a lot of fun if you're as geeky as me regarding these things...
          http://www.analyticcycling.com/
          "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

          "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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            #20
            I recently inquired about shipping charges on these wheels. They told me shipping to the U.S. was around $110.

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              #21
              I wonder what the prices really are, though. Upgrading to titanium handrims costs $0 according to their website. Whereas a pair of titanium handrims (just the handrims) costs $425 at sportaid (about as much as the wheels and handrims from sweel... supposedly.

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