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    #16
    Originally posted by ala View Post
    I think the answer to your question is "no," not in any real way you can feel. I have both a TR3 and a new ZR. The lower frame tube on the TR is very stiff. I feel no isolating effects from mounting the camber tube this way.
    Thankyou, it was just a thought I had. For me personally if anything it's the jolts transmitted through the castors and thus footplate that grief rather that than the jolts transmitted through the seat. I've got 5"x1" solid poly castors, do the castors with a rubber-like tyre give more cushioning?

    Also I'd be interested in your opinion (in regards to rolling resistance) between the open frame ZR and box frame TR? I would think that the different characteristics between the pneumatic and solid tyres makes direct comparison difficult. Have you ever had at one time the same type of tyre on both chairs?

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      #17
      Originally posted by Creaking Gate View Post
      Thankyou, it was just a thought I had. For me personally if anything it's the jolts transmitted through the castors and thus footplate that grief rather that than the jolts transmitted through the seat. I've got 5"x1" solid poly castors, do the castors with a rubber-like tyre give more cushioning?
      (I'll butt in since I'm here.)

      Yes. A lot of folks here are big fans of Frog Legs Soft Roll castors, they give a much softer ride (but your solid poly ones will probably perform noticeably better on carpet). There are also suspension forks, Frog Legs again makes them and TiLite has its own version. They're pricey. The castors provide enough jolt-proofing for many. Castors are easily changed after purchase, forks less so. If you're thinking about doing an aftermarket fork change (which will typically save you money over ordering the chair with suspension forks already on it), be sure the forks you order take the same size bearings as the forks you want to change to (this is a TiLite Buyer Beware area).

      FWIW, I've tried a fair few castors now. Jolts don't bother me, but weight does. I've tried and rejected Frog Legs soft rolls and the Melrose equivalent because I don't like the extra weight on the front of my chair. I'm actually happiest with SportAid's US$38 light-up plastic 5x1" castors, they're a bit softer than the hard black poly castors that came standard on my old chair but they're narrow and good on carpet and they amuse me. :-)

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        #18
        the castors i got with my tr3 are good i like them, the rubber is quite absorbing compared to my second chair which are those cheap castors with the hard rubber, if you get after market forks consider the fact they might alter the front end of the chair so you might have to adjust the rear wheel height and if its none adjustable your stuck.

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          #19
          Soft roll casters are a little wider than the standard 1" kind. They are usually 1.4" wide but will still fit most forks. And yes, they have a cushioning effect. They do give a smoother, softer ride. They may be wider but that doesn't mean they don't do almost as well on hard floors. A look at the picture and you'll see that the wider tires are also crowned. That means they actually contact hard surfaces along a narrower track, not much wider than hard roll casters. Hard roll court casters do respond quicker, and I like them, but the soft rolls aren't bad either. As for carpeted floors, many people find that the wider softrolls perform better than the narrower casters on thicker, deeper carpet. They seem to "float" across the pile rather than dig in like the narrower wheels. I find this to be true also.

          I really don't feel any difference between frame designs for rolling resistance. That is more a function of weight, tires, and moving parts like wheels and bearings. And I have had other brands of box frame and "open frame," as you call them, with several different types of tires (I switch wheels sometimes). I also don't notice much difference between solid and the same width pneumatic tires, as long as the air pressure is above 110psi. They both ride along that crown I was talking about. Solids tires do loose there crown shape as they wear, however.

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            #20
            Thankyou all for the replies, your experience with different types equipment is invaluable. I'd never even heard of 'frogs legs' until visiting this site, and when I first came across the term thought, 'What the hell are they?'. After some googling I found them. They look good, but also quite heavy and expensive, and seeing as I've only got skinny arms. I think they will too much weight to my chair. I might try some different castors or just go a bit steadier over ridges and low kerbs etc.

            Originally posted by ala View Post
            A look at the picture and you'll see that the wider tires are also crowned. That means they actually contact hard surfaces along a narrower track, not much wider than hard roll casters.
            I'd never thought of this before but now you mention it, it's obvious! It must also be the reason why it's better to keep HP tyres properly inflated as you're riding on narrower strip of rubber along the crown. BTW I inflate my MP Evo tyres to 100psi, although it's bloody hard work. Both me and my mum have lean the on the stirrup pump handle together. And she never pushes at the same time as me!

            While on subject of titanium vs aluminium I'd appreciate opinions on this chair https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZYNrVblmAE. It's an all titanium chair apart from the axle plates, castor forks, and pushrims. It's not bespoke like a Tilite but for here in the UK it offers exceptional value for money, and many of the optional extras that bump up the cost of a Tilite come as standard on the Invacare, and those that don't are priced very reasonably. Admittedly it's not the most attractive of chairs, especially the front castor forks and mounting. Also it has limited COG, but on the plus side it looks well built? Also both the seat and back upholstery are adjustable by velcro straps as standard. I'm not necessarily going to buy it! I just think it offers exceptional value for money for an all titanium chair. But not so good for car loading from the drivers seat.
            Last edited by Creaking Gate; 13 Jun 2015, 8:43 AM. Reason: Paragraph and link re Invacare chair.

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              #21
              Originally posted by Creaking Gate View Post
              They look good, but also quite heavy and expensive, and seeing as I've only got skinny arms. I think they will too much weight to my chair.
              I would say they are a long way from "quite heavy". While they will be heavier than some small, skinny castors, they are not that heavy and have many benefits. They are a popular option by many members on here.
              C5-6 Complete - 8/13/1982

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                #22
                FYI:

                Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

                All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

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                  #23
                  No doubt weight can add up, but IMO 1 of those is a good all-purpose caster. If the additional weight is "significant" enough to be too much strength wise, I suspect they would be using a power chair. That said, I can certainly understand someone not wanting the added weight, more so with the forks, which I use.

                  Reading how the poster uses their chair, I would not rule out FL casters for their function; specifically stating they only use the chair outside; those skinny and hard wheels suck outside.
                  C5-6 Complete - 8/13/1982

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                    #24
                    Be interested to hear anyone who has tried those 4" Scooter wheels, especially how they compare to the common soft roll.

                    I can imagine them sliding quite easily on slick surfaces while you transfer?

                    Originally posted by ala View Post
                    FYI:

                    Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

                    All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

                    [ATTACH]57107[/ATTACH]

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                      #25
                      they are hard but have some grip, like inline skate wheels

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by ala View Post
                        FYI:

                        Suspension forks like Frog Legs or TiLite Slipstream are heavier than std forks. Combined with heavier casters like the softroll type, the weight may be significant for someone to whom arm strength is at a premium. However, there may be some benefit to using a different caster, even with the weight gain.

                        All casters pictured are 4" diameter.

                        [ATTACH]57107[/ATTACH]
                        What/who is the source of these weights?
                        stephen@bike-on.com

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                          #27
                          Fwiw:

                          [ATTACH]57108[/ATTACH]
                          Chas
                          TiLite TR3
                          Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
                          I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

                          "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
                          <
                          UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                            What/who is the source of these weights?
                            I am the source. I weighed them myself today with a digital scale.

                            Originally posted by NW-Will View Post
                            Be interested to hear anyone who has tried those 4" Scooter wheels, especially how they compare to the common soft roll.
                            I can imagine them sliding quite easily on slick surfaces while you transfer?
                            I have used two sets of these razor scooter wheels over the years on two different chairs (Kuschall and Colours Eclipse). They may look jelly like, but they are very firm. They also roll along a very thin track. Look carefully at the wear along the crown of the polyurethane wheel pictured. It actually only measures about 5mm wide. These things are cheap, come in colors (even lighted), have very good bearings, are long wearing, and difficult to damage. I used to buy them in pairs for $10-$15, and they came with bearings and an allen wrench. The 4" size (sold as 98-100mm) is very responsive on hard surfaces and glides effortlessly. They are poor on carpeted surfaces, however. They are nothing like soft rolls. There is no smoothing or cushioning effect. I've never had much problem while transferring. But they are smooth polyurethane, so you can imagine they have their limits on very smooth wet surfaces, especially while turning fast. I have heard of many wheelchair users using these.

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                              #29
                              I should also note that razor scooter wheels are very bad on rough surfaces like gravel. And they are horrendous in dirt or on grass. Transfers on smooth hard surfaces might not be bad, but beware in dirt or grass. The little buggers with dig in like a spade creating furrows. I can't tell you how many times I have flipped forward out of my chair reaching down for something in the yard. To add injury to insult, I've had my chair flip on top of me while trying to transfer back from sitting on the ground. And when I've had to park my car in soft grass, they would bury themselves up to the bearings when I put weight on them to transfer.

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                                #30
                                I've got 3" razors on the chair that stays indoors. That chair runs almost exclusively on hardwood floors. Those wheels are perfect for that purpose IMHO. I have them on another chair which also sometimes needs to go outside, not so much fun, need to keep them wheelied alot outside.
                                I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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