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    Gloves and blisters

    Since I have been using my manual chair a lot more and sometimes going for a few miles on the bike path I have been getting blisters on my hands. I have used leather bike gloves that can be purchased at sporting goods stores in the past, but prefer something gripper (neurological disorder, it effects my hands somewhat, sorta like a low level quad). I have been using the rubber grippy type gloves from the hardware store, the heavy duty kind, and love how grippy they are but I still get blisters. I have been using my chair more for about 2 months. Do you just have to be patient until you build up callouses?
    chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

    #2
    Put this in the sports part and some of the racers can help.
    I haven't raced in years, but here's what I did.
    Using athletic tape, tape each of your fingers. Some people like to tape a couple fingers together.
    Turn a leather glove inside out. To put the seams on the outside.
    Or wear, hand ball or baseball gloves.
    I use to wrap the glove ins athletic tape and then black friction tape. I also wraped the hand rims in friction tape.
    People now glue old tires to the hand rim and use clister (sp). Its cross country ski wax.
    Then you push with the back of your hand in a fist.
    Google wheelchair racers and you will see the tape and stuff.
    There are also mittens and gloves made to push with. Look on Ideamobility.com I think he carries them.
    It will take some time to get the callouses in the right places, no matter what you do. So don't push so much you break the blisters.

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      #3
      Look into rubber (or silicone) handrim covers for grippiness, but other than that it'll just take time to build up the callouses.

      I'm a part time wheelchair user and have never really built up the right callouses but I find that fingerless leather weightlifting gloves and Surge LT handrims make a good combination for me.

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        #4
        I've been really liking my Hatch Specialist gloves. Nice and grippy, fit great, seem ideal for pushing a wheelchair handrim, etc. Cant beat them for under $20 delivered

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          #5
          Thanks guys! I will look into all this stuff. I am amazed at how many push with no gloves, or so it seems. Not that I see that many wheelchair users here,
          chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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            #6
            For everyday pushing I don't use gloves, but anything longer, I have used the garden gloves with rubber, or bike gloves with a nice pad in the palm area. I have used the latter when working out with a table top crank exerciser.
            At some point do you think you will try a race chair or a handcycle?

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              #7
              Not sure, probably just do it for exercise on the bike path. I'd like to get to where I could do the entire length of it in one go, it's 7 miles, and I would do it downriver first Maybe at some point I'd be strong enough to do the length of it going upriver. Our local adaptive sports group doesn't have any handcycles, so my opportunities to try those have been extremely limited.
              chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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                #8
                I didn't use gloves for some 10 years, then lately I've discovered it is so much easier to use 'em. Less grabbing force needed, dry skin is no problem, much more power put to the wheels if you have a good grip, etc. I'm still unclear on the concept with those weird fingerless gloves which are supposed to be 'popular' with wheelchair users, a good fitting set of regular neoprene gloves give plenty of dexterity, and still function as 'gloves'. Look less gay also, lol

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                  #9
                  When I first started pushing, I got the fingerless gloves and pushed with the heel of my hand on the tire, and my fingers around the push rim. When I noticed that if I gripped only the handrim, I had more control and a better push on the flats and slight hills. It was hard to grip the rams with fingerless gloves and I switched to Saranak batters gloves.

                  Lately the best deals on good gloves are often found in work gloves at Home Depot - who'da thunk?
                  Don - Grad Student Emeritus
                  T3 ASIA A 27 years post injury

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Sarafino View Post
                    Not sure, probably just do it for exercise on the bike path. I'd like to get to where I could do the entire length of it in one go, it's 7 miles, and I would do it downriver first Maybe at some point I'd be strong enough to do the length of it going upriver. Our local adaptive sports group doesn't have any handcycles, so my opportunities to try those have been extremely limited.
                    I have no doubt you will be able to do the full 7 miles! Just a comment - if you can get the local group to get a handcycle or race chair on loan, it might be great for others to see/try as well. I'm an old polio-para, hubby SCI and we got into road racing around age 40, for 12 years, did about 100 races, then got handcycles for recreation only, for about 7 years until the shoulders started to weaken. Loved every minute of it.
                    Pushing is great for exercise and we both feel our years racing gave us a healthy foundation for aging. The training alone - weights, watching nutrition, in addition to socializing was worth all the work.

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                      #11
                      I found out yesterday that an adaptive group from Denver is going to be here in a few weeks for a bike race, so I messaged one of the people there I know to ask if there would be any way I could take one of their handcycles on the bike path. Hopefully someone will let me do that. Our local adaptive center caters to kids with developmental disorders and not as many physically disabled people. They have a ski program but most of the physically disabled people come from out of state. I know of one other manual chair user who has a handcycle here but I have only met her once and she is sorta aloof, so I would feel weird asking if I could try hers out. Anyhow, fingers crossed I can try one out in a few weeks. I have an arm powered tricycle, but I was never able to go up even moderate hills with it, it is clunky and sits high up off the ground and you have to strap your feet to the pedals. I don't think it was made with wheelchair users in mind so much, not sure if that counts as a handcycle. Not very streamlined or made for more than going around a level block.
                      chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Sarafino View Post
                        Not sure, probably just do it for exercise on the bike path. I'd like to get to where I could do the entire length of it in one go, it's 7 miles, and I would do it downriver first Maybe at some point I'd be strong enough to do the length of it going upriver. Our local adaptive sports group doesn't have any handcycles, so my opportunities to try those have been extremely limited.
                        Watch the wind in CO. I once pushed from Carbondale to Redstone. Its up hill. Was fine. When I turned around to go back I realized the wind had been at my back, blowing about 20 mph. It was harder pushing back down hill.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Sarafino View Post
                          I found out yesterday that an adaptive group from Denver is going to be here in a few weeks for a bike race, so I messaged one of the people there I know to ask if there would be any way I could take one of their handcycles on the bike path.
                          If it's Adaptive Adventures and the Iron Horse Classic, contact Janice (her email address is here: http://adaptiveadventures.org/contact). She ought to be able to set you up.

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                            #14
                            Sounds great that you'll get a chance to try a more modern handcycle. That woman you mention, could she be shy, that sometimes comes off as aloof? It would be nice to have a local fellow wheeler if you do get into it. Most paralyzed chair users are totally open to equipment questions/issues.

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                              #15
                              Katja, yes, I heard back from Matt (I have been on several of their Lake Powell trips) and will be sending Janice an email today Triumph, perhaps someday I will make a wheeler friend here, I have been trying to meet other disabled people here for 15 years through skiing, a few other occasional summer activities the adaptive sports group has (mostly for kids with developmental disorders, I don't fit in) and now am getting involved with the local independent living center. You'd think I'd have gimps coming out my ears....but not so much.
                              chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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