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    #16
    I just noticed your cable ties at the front of your chair. They are there for you to loop the calf strap through so that when you chuck it into the car etc the calf strap doesn't move up and try to become a seat depth extension.

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      #17
      Here is a pic of me in the chair with my smaller wheels (they measure about 23 3/4" on the outside of the tread):

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      I think I found the problem with pulling to the left, the left wheel is toed out. No wonder it wants to go left I only had one yard stick, so I couldn't do it the way nonoise suggested, but I have a framing square and flipped it back onto the handles and checked it that way. I am sure it isn't as precise, but the difference was pretty big so I will adjust it with washers sometime today and see where that gets me. Here is another issue my husband was wondering about, is it normal for the caster forks to have this much play up and down in the housing?

      http://youtu.be/FhkxWPahizE
      chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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        #18
        Thank you Ala for your feedback regarding tire size, too. The guy that gave me all this still is pretty tall, and the wheels are brand new like he never even used them. Guess I should list them somewhere, maybe trade them. Definately for a much taller person that I.
        chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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          #19
          in a word, no. It's not normal to have that much play. Take the cap off the top of the castor housing and make sure the nut is done up properly, but not so much as to restrict the castors turning.

          Your castor mounts still don't look upright. Use your framing square to check them. The part where the castors attach to the frame of the chair has a straight edge at the front which should eb perpendicular to the floor. The bolts that hold it on are offset bolts so by loosening and rotating them you will adjust the castor mount position, set it so that they are perpendicular to the floor.

          Your wheels look like a good size for you. Your fingertips are roughly level with your axle pin which means that you are sitting at a good height in relation to the wheels for efficient pushing.

          Your seat depth is a little short, but the fact that you have the footplate flipped out will have semi compensated for that. If you were ordering your own custom chair then you'd want an extra inch or two in seat depth really.

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            #20
            . . . and, if you're comfortable with the idea, move your axle a bit forward (no more than 1/2" at a time) to make your chair less front heavy (easier to wheel over thresholds and such). If you move it forward too far, tipping over backwards becomes likely (which is why some users have anti-tippers, including me).
            Chas
            TiLite TR3
            Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
            I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

            "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
            <
            UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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              #21
              Originally posted by chasmengr View Post
              . . . and, if you're comfortable with the idea, move your axle a bit forward (no more than 1/2" at a time) to make your chair less front heavy (easier to wheel over thresholds and such). If you move it forward too far, tipping over backwards becomes likely (which is why some users have anti-tippers, including me).
              X2, Chas beat me to it. Your chair will be easier to push if you get some weight off the casters. Find out how much weight is there now by placing a small board on bathroom scales, sit in your chair with the casters up on that board. It's pretty dramatic the change you get when moving the axle position and trying it again.
              I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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                #22
                As I and others have said, it looks like you need to adjust your front fork alignment. You can see; it appears that your front forks are not right. Pictures can be deceiving, so check it just in case. Alignment is measure at the fork barrel, where the upper and lower bearings are. Please check this with the wheels you plan on using.

                I included a comparison with the larger wheels so you can better see the effect rear seat height has on fork alignment. It doesn't take much to throw things out of whack. Your chair will not handle at its best this way. Forks that are extremely out of alignment can cause stress and problems when encountering uneven pavement.

                You would also do well to make sure all your bearings are turning freely and not worn or dirty (fork bearings, caster bearings, rear wheel bearings).

                For your additional information, those 700c/28-622 wheels/tires are one of the only times you'll see bicycle and wheelchair wheel and tire sizes labeled the same.

                Click image for larger version

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                  #23
                  Thank you ala!!!!! I just had an 'aha' moment!!!!!!! I was using my framers square to check to plumb from the side, not front......aha! Thank you so much!!!! I am so looking forward to hitting the bike path again this week after making these adjustments. I am so incredibly appreciative of all the info people here on this forum have shared with me! I have lived in this area 13 years.and have yet to make a wheelie friend, try as I might. I will let you all know how it goes, and I will consider moving the wheels forward a little. I don't have anti tippers...but I do own a helmet
                  chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Sarafino View Post
                    . . . I don't have anti tippers...but I do own a helmet
                    I have both - I like to coast down steep hills really fast
                    Chas
                    TiLite TR3
                    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
                    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

                    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
                    <
                    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

                    Comment


                      #25
                      You should be able to adjust the axle a little forward without causing yourself to tip out backwards, but like others have said already it's best to do this 1/2" at a time so you can get used to it and then decide if you feel safe and want to try a little more.

                      The anti tips are still available from Sunrise Medical too, so if you want them you're looking for anti tips to fit a Quickie GPV. If your arm function is good (and it sounds like it's good enough) then search youtube for wheelchair skills and enlist your partners help to learn how to control the balance of the chair. It'll be a really useful skill for kerbs etc and will enable you to have the chair in a more 'tippy' set up, which is easier to propel, without it being unsafe.

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                        #26
                        When you get the chair sorted out a bit, you might try both wheels/tires. Compare the feel. The 24 inch tires are solid. The ride may be a bit hard, but you won't get a flat. The big tires/wheels are high pressure air filled tires. They should roll easier, but require putting air in once in a while.
                        If one is noticeably more comfortable to use, set the chair up for that.
                        Read through this http://www.spinalcordinjury-paralysis.org/blogs/20/2394 and search for some other info on the subject.

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                          #27
                          Here are some pics of me with the larger wheels. They make my shoulders go up at the highest point of the hand rims, they make me feel tipped forward, if I lower the seat then the weight height will come up even farther on my body (right now they feel higher than my hips), it's almost like I can't get my arms around them. Outside diameter is 26 1/2". Sorta bummed because they are super nice wheels. Also, after watching a few videos on proper wheelchair fit, I am wondering if it's also too wide, or is the wheel to my body distance about right? Plus, I know you all want to see me in my fancy outfit again

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                          chair user since 2009 from a neurological disorder

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                            #28
                            Yes, it looks a little too wide. An axle with a little camber would solve that problem-I think my (available ) axle had 2*
                            That Quickie Revolution is identical to my first chair down to the dark green paint! Although it's a bit of a heavy clunker, I certainly appreciated how small it folded!
                            I have a Kurshall 3000GT that I picked up as a second chair from a much smaller guy that might be a perfect fit for you. If you were nearby, I'd be happy to trade with you.
                            Having the QR that folds up so compact would sometimes be a good option for me-+ I have a lot of spare parts!
                            69yo male T12 complete since 1995
                            NW NJ

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                              #29
                              Yes it looks a little wide, but the seat itself looks ok. i.e. the distance between the sideguards is only fractionally too wide for you, the problem is coming from the distance between the sideguards and the wheels.

                              On the GPV I think that is adjustable though. You need a couple of really large spanners to grab both sides of the axle pin where it goes through the mounting block. Loosen it off, adjust it so that it sticks under the chair more and out less then re tighten it. If you can, count the turns that you loosen it and tighten it back the same. You don't want to over tighten it as that can distort where the axle goes, but you also don't want it to come loose.
                              While you're doing that you can also bring the axle forward by a 1/2 inch and see how you find it.

                              With the wheels brought in a bit you might find that you can afford to put a bit of camber back on, which will help with your outdoor use and your turning manoeuvrability.

                              As for the size of your wheels, I'd need to see a side on picture of you with your hands gripping the top of the handrim. It sounds like the 26" might be a bit too big for you, most people use 24" but without seeing it, it's hard to say for sure. And mathematics and research can only get us so far anyway, it depends what it feels like to you.

                              Your current axle height setting gets your fingertips level with the axle as per reccommendations but as you've found out a larger wheel raises your rear seat to ground height and also raises the wheel relative to your body. From what I can see in the picture it looks like a 24" or 25" would suit you better than the 26".
                              Last edited by Faethe; 28 Apr 2015, 12:35 PM. Reason: additional information

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                                #30
                                What is your wheel spacing between the frame and the axle on that chair? From the front view, the seat looks about right for your hips. So, we can check wheel spacing away from the frame. Pull the sideguard off, then measure the frame rail (it's seat sling or dark green) to the spokes of the wheel. That should get you pretty close and is generally a simple to remember measurement like 3/4" or 1" inch. If they are much longer than that, consider why (and report back here). Some people need more wheel spacing to accommodate snow tires or something but those aren't snow tires. You can look at your user's manual for clues on how to adjust wheel spacing. Personally I like 3/4" or 1", not much more than that.

                                Also something with Quickie's that I've noticed, is that sometimes your sideguards can get out of line. If I lean side to side and my sideguard mounts (the little rectangular buggers that hold my sideguards in) - are not 100% tight, I can push the sideguard out so it tilts into my tire. I prefer them as close to 100% straight up and/or squeezing the cushion as I can get. So, I will make an adjustment: with me out of the chair, I will flip the chair into a position such that I can access the inside mounts from underneath (usually flip with the footrest up in the air and on the back, or on the front of the footrest). Then I take my allen wrench that allows plenty of torque and I will loosen the mount not more than 1-2 turns (I have good torque wrenches though, so more than 1-2 turns is significant loosening!). I will tilt the mount to where the sideguard fits tightly around my cushion the way I like (you may have to check by putting the sideguard in - you could leave the sideguards in, but it sometimes makes it more difficult to tilt). Then once I have adjusted the tilt the way I like and the sideguard fits I will take my allen wrench and tighten them up as tight as they can go without hurting my frame. I generally have them pretty tight now.

                                Then you can adjust the wheels further in if you like, now that your sideguards will (hopefully) protect your clothes and not interfere. Of course, this is all subject to what you like. Aside from adding camber though, this is the only way to bring the wheels closer to you that I know, without changing the chair width.

                                Keep letting us know what you learn - I really enjoy coming back to the thread and seeing what info I can glean, too!
                                Mystery

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