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Should a wheelchair be comfortable?

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    #16
    [QUOTE=grommet;1752627

    The seat posts dig in to my back. I need the high support, not sure what to do about that but thinking about getting a Roho solid back. So my ideas for now are to increase RSH to 17", go to a solid setback and have no taper in the frame. Also wondering about changing to 85 degree front end.[/QUOTE]

    I've been using hard backs since Jay first introduced them back in the mid-'80s. When I trialed the New Halls Wheels Hallmark (Bob would actually ship you a demo chair to check out!) it had a crappy sling back and the back posts were digging into me where I lacked sensation causing mild dysreflexia. When I got my own Halls chair, I put a Jay Xtreme back, the sleekest one available at the time. For the past many years I've been using the ADI carbon fiber back and yes, I find it comfortable.

    Though I think my chair is quite comfortable, I need to keep moving around and shifting positions. If I meditate from my chair, I get uncomfortable (though this is a common experience even among ABs while meditating).
    stephen@bike-on.com

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      #17
      I think of my wheelchair as more of a prosthetic device rather than a wheeled vehicle, but there are similarities to other vehicles, like automobiles. Both have the same comfort vs. performance dilemma. A high performance sports/race car may be fast and handle well, but the ride is usually stiff and rough. And they have minimal interior and creature comforts. Some don't come with power accessories, air conditioning, radios, or even heaters. If you want comfort, you'll need a luxury car. That will be larger, heavier, and have thick cushy seats and plenty of interior amenities. Both types of cars are very different; but also, both types will be similarly expensive.

      Our ultra-light performance wheelchairs have minimal upholstery, narrow hard tires, 85-90 degree front ends, and 3 or 4" casters. There's not much room to design-in a whole lot of comfort. A comfortable chair might have to be longer, wider, have a separate backrest, a suspension system front and rear, and a nice thick cushion. That will also make it larger, heavier, slower, and less responsive. I think every wheelchair is a personal compromise between the two extremes.

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        #18
        Nicely put, ala.

        Originally posted by ala View Post
        I think of my wheelchair as more of a prosthetic device rather than a wheeled vehicle, but there are similarities to other vehicles, like automobiles. Both have the same comfort vs. performance dilemma. A high performance sports/race car may be fast and handle well, but the ride is usually stiff and rough. And they have minimal interior and creature comforts. Some don't come with power accessories, air conditioning, radios, or even heaters. If you want comfort, you'll need a luxury car. That will be larger, heavier, and have thick cushy seats and plenty of interior amenities. Both types of cars are very different; but also, both types will be similarly expensive.

        Our ultra-light performance wheelchairs have minimal upholstery, narrow hard tires, 85-90 degree front ends, and 3 or 4" casters. There's not much room to design-in a whole lot of comfort. A comfortable chair might have to be longer, wider, have a separate backrest, a suspension system front and rear, and a nice thick cushion. That will also make it larger, heavier, slower, and less responsive. I think every wheelchair is a personal compromise between the two extremes.
        stephen@bike-on.com

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