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Occasional use off-road wheels on a budget???

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    #16
    I've wondered about having some wheels built, talked to the local bike shop. If you bring everything in they only charge 35 to build and true them. So I've got spokes and hubs, and just need a wider rim lol. But then comes in having to get it drilled for handrims.... I haven't seen the exact size wheelchair rim I'd want, and of course they're so much more expensive than bicycle ones. Guess I'll have to find out if the upcharge is worth it compared to getting handrims put on. At the same time I want to get a set of those taiwan wheels and matching casters some day, the price is 407 for a pair of rear wheels with 100-125 for shipping to the US, I'm waiting to find out the price for just the wheels and no handrims or tires since I use natural fits. Someday... haha.
    Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

    I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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      #17
      Maybe something like this could be fabricated.

      http://www.melrosewheelchairs.com/

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        #18
        Well the new Fatso's are totally budget busters as far as I'm concerned... I'm looking more at a budget of $1-200, doing most of the work myself... (I have access to people with expertise on building / truing wheels and tools if needed...) In addition the idea of tubular pushrims is a total non-starter as far as I'm concerned, as Natural Fit rims are so much better. That said, I'm not planning to put ANY pushrims on the outdoor wheels - I will be wearing gloves anyway, so pushing on the tires isn't a big deal, and besides volunteers will be doing a lot of the pushing..

        Speaking in more general terms, I think it's an incredible ripoff what we get charged for wheelchair wheels when compared to the cost of pedal bike wheels....

        I'm also not going to do hub locks for the same reason - not to mention the extra weight...

        In terms of making something, those Melrose chairs look cool, but seems to me like they would be more in the way than anything for off-roading, as those guards make the footprint bigger... They certainly would have been a problem for the crew that was helping to get me to the climbing crags on Crow Hill... It was hard enough finding a way to get my minimal framed Quickie Q-7 over the rocks...

        Totally an "other person propelled" approach, but at the Boston Abilities Expo they had an Italian tourism outfit that had a neat all-terrain approach - essentially a sedan chair with a single central wheel directly under the seat / center of gravity, with stretcher handles and shoulder straps on the front and rear. The claim was that this allowed HP access to all the pre-ADA Italian historical / scenic sights with less hassle than with a standard manual chair (forget about doing it in a several hundred pound power-chair...) Would be a nice solution for those situations where you are dependent on AB assistants to get where you are going...

        ex-Gooserider
        T-5 ASIA-B para, currently working on building own power chair, as being in a manual is an EXTRA handicap.

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          #19
          I suggested Fatso's just as I browse the second hand cast offs. It is amazing some of the extra ordinarily low prices that come up on Craigslist. As for brakes, it shouldn't slip away too fast with soft tires anyway.
          On the other hand...I think you did not see the right wheels in the Melrose link. Look at these X-Wheels:
          Melrose X-Wheels
          I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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            #20
            Well that is a surprise. I copy pasted Melrose X-Wheels and got the picture instead, cool. So looking at that picture, a year ago I tried to build something like that out of composite (the cheap plastic) wheels hooking them up side by side. Some things don't work out. Ah, many things don't work out.
            I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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              #21
              I ordered these tires http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 and mounted it on my 25" spinergy wheels. I was worried that the 2.5" width would not seat in the rim but it does. Took it for a quick spin in the grass at the park nearby and it worked great. I did this setup for snow and beach, but I haven't had a chance to go yet. Dependent on the wheel spacing to your wheelchair frame, you may need a longer axle with a spacer but this is a easy fix. There are other 2" + tires on Amazon/online.
              http://www.adaptivesportsforums.com/

              I love sports! Wheelchair Basketball, Sled Hockey, Mono-Skiing, and Handcycling.

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                #22
                Another example of how ISO ETRTO tire sizes matter.... What is the RIM diameter of the wheels it is intended to go on? If you don't have the right size rim, the tire will not fit....

                Note the number of choices for a "26 x ??? " tire size - (all cribbed from Sheldon's site...)

                "26 size" ISO SIZE APPLICATION
                26 x 1 (650 C) 571 mm Triathlon, time trial, small road bikes

                26 x 1 1/4 597 mm Older British sport & club bikes

                26 x 1 3/8 (S-6) 597 mm Schwinn "lightweights"

                26 x 1 3/8 (E.A.3) 590 mm Most English 3-speeds, department-store or juvenile 10 speeds

                26 x 1 1/2 (650B) 584 mm French utility, tandem and loaded-touring bikes,
                a very few Raleigh (U.S.) & Schwinn mountain bikes.

                26 x 1 3/4 (S-7) 571 mm Schwinn cruisers

                26 x 1, 1 1/8 571mm High performance wheels for smaller riders, common on Cannondale bicycles

                26 x 1.00 through 2.3 559mm Most Mountain bikes, cruisers, etc.

                26 x 1.25 (rare) 599 mm Very old U.S. lightweights[
                26 x 1.375 Very old U.S. lightweights[/TD]

                Or going the other way....

                599 mm 26 x 1.25, x 1.375

                597 mm 26 x 1 1/4, 26 x 1 3/8 (S-6)

                590 mm 26 x 1 3/8 (E.A.3), 650 A

                587 mm 700 D

                584 mm 650B, 26 x 1 1/2

                571 mm 26 x 1, 26 x 1 3/4, 650 C

                559 mm 26 x 1.00- x 2.125

                The Amazon site didn't give the ISO / ETRTO size, just 26 x 2.5, but the Maxxis site did - I looked just out of curiosity... it is a 61-559, which is reasonably consistent with the 2.5 width size (61mm ~ 2.5" more or less...)

                Seems like a decent tire - though I'm looking for something in the 507mm size to match my existing 24" size wheels - I don't want to totally change the chair configuration when doing the indoor - outdoor switch...

                ex-Gooserider
                T-5 ASIA-B para, currently working on building own power chair, as being in a manual is an EXTRA handicap.

                Comment


                  #23
                  We are looking to do something similar, but primarily for shock absorption, and I looked into a lot of options, some of which have already been mentioned. We still have not made a decision on it yet, but I started a webpage with many of the options if you are interested: shock absorbing tires wheels (sorry, a bit messy).

                  Originally posted by ex-Gooserider View Post
                  A...though I'm looking for something in the 507mm size to match my existing 24" size wheels - I don't want to totally change the chair configuration when doing the indoor - outdoor switch...
                  Last edited by elarson; 19 Oct 2014, 9:28 AM.
                  Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                  Comment


                    #24
                    EXCELLENT writeup - lots of good info on your page, thanks for the link...

                    About the only option I didn't see you mention very much is the idea of using one of your existing wheels with new rims in a desired size - probably from a bicycle source rather than a chair company. May mean losing the push-rims, but my feeling is that if I'm putting on super wide tires, then chair width becomes a major concern, and getting rid of the push rims brings the width back down to something approaching what a typical skinny wheel with push rims gives...

                    Originally posted by elarson View Post
                    We are looking to do something similar, but primarily for shock absorption, and I looked into a lot of options, some of which have already been mentioned. We still have not made a decision on it yet, but I started a webpage with many of the options if you are interested: shock absorbing tires wheels (sorry, a bit messy).
                    ex-Gooserider
                    T-5 ASIA-B para, currently working on building own power chair, as being in a manual is an EXTRA handicap.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      It's listed under Current 540 Hubs Rebuilt for 507 Wheels and New Tires. The problem is the labour costs to build a wheel with separately purchased hub, rims, spokes. I think I read somewhere to expect at least $150, if not more.

                      Originally posted by ex-Gooserider View Post
                      EXCELLENT writeup - lots of good info on your page, thanks for the link...

                      About the only option I didn't see you mention very much is the idea of using one of your existing wheels with new rims in a desired size - probably from a bicycle source rather than a chair company. May mean losing the push-rims, but my feeling is that if I'm putting on super wide tires, then chair width becomes a major concern, and getting rid of the push rims brings the width back down to something approaching what a typical skinny wheel with push rims gives...



                      ex-Gooserider
                      Last edited by elarson; 21 Oct 2014, 7:57 AM.
                      Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                      Comment


                        #26
                        my local bike shop charges $50 or less plus cost of components... If I supply all the stuff then $50 or less is the added cost to build the wheel.

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                          #27
                          I'd call around and ask a few shops, I'd expect that NL would have a lot of competition given the number of shops.... I think someone in one of these threads was saying they were quoted US $35.00 / wheel for labor so not that bad.

                          As extra cost reducers, I'd point out that both wheels would be the same, and that they are radial spoke pattern, which should be faster / easier to lace and true... Might not hurt to mention that it is for a chair as well - that can sometimes get a "charitable action" discount.... (Ironic, the companies that are supposedly in business to "help" us, are the ones that charge us the most; while many of the shops that we go to otherwise will give us a discount for being handicapped...)

                          ex-Gooserider

                          ex-Gooserider
                          T-5 ASIA-B para, currently working on building own power chair, as being in a manual is an EXTRA handicap.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Something I forgot to mention about using our existing hubs is that they have a 30 spoke count, but most bike rims have 28, 32 or 36 spoke holes. I can not find any 507 rims with 30 spoke holes, only 559's (Spinergy or Out-front Shadow).
                            Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                            Comment


                              #29
                              I was the one quoted as 35, my local bike shop will build a wheel if you provide the supplies for just 35. Finding the right rims has been an issue for me as well however, and that of course adds to the cost.

                              Are the rims on sportaid sold in pairs or by the single? I couldn't find anything that said. If its by the single rim, then thats 60 per rim which makes 120 for the set plus 35 for the work and brings you up to elarson's 150 without even the spoke cost. Personally because I don't have the money, I've been hoping to come across some used rims! And wondering about drilling holes into bicycle rims for the handrims. I don't care so much about width for an outdoor set, and use natural fit rims. Though I've thought since I'll be using the smart drive power assist, maybe I'll be fine with regular rims letting it do the work. Though if I found 507 rims I guess I'd be fine since I have 24" natural fits. But that brings me back to the cost of new rims, while I'm looking more at some used 559 rims and balloon tires like schwalbe big apples....
                              Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

                              I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Hi ~Lin,

                                Originally posted by ~Lin View Post
                                Are the rims on sportaid sold in pairs or by the single?
                                Some wheel parts are priced per pair and others for each. Are you talking about the Sun Metal Double Wall Wheelchair Everyday Rims? I think it is per pair, because it says "the best deals on Double Wall Wheelchair Everyday Rims by Sun Metal come from purchasing in pairs.". Just as an FYI, I think Bike-On probably sells these rims also, and it may be worth checking with them too.


                                Though if I found 507 rims I guess I'd be fine since I have 24" natural fits. But that brings me back to the cost of new rims, while I'm looking more at some used 559 rims and balloon tires like schwalbe big apples....
                                I'm not sure if you can use 540 hand rims with 507 wheels. We have Out-Front Shadow 24” (540) wheels with standard 24" 6 tab Aluminum Long Tab hand rims that we purchased on a TiLite wheelchair. I am also curious if we could use the hand rims on 507 wheels. I've sent Out-Front a message to ask them if they would consider making 507 rims, and if yes, if the 540 hand rims could be used.
                                Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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