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Questions About Wheelchairs/Components in General, and Specifically for TiLite Aero Z

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  • #61
    Do look at Tilite's color configurator. You can get pretty crazy with it:

    Click image for larger version

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    Oh, you want black . . .
    Chas
    TiLite TR3
    Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
    I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

    "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
    <
    UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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    • #62
      Originally posted by chasmengr View Post
      Life in a wheelchair needs to be as fun as possible - the equipment is part of us - it's our legs for heavens sake... A properly configured chair will set you free beyond your wildest imaginings. Obtaining one is far more complex and personal than buying most anything else.
      Very well put. And, I think you have this down pretty well, and your transfer to a new chair will work out great. If not, I will help you rage.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by chasmengr View Post
        Oh, you want black . . .
        Not anymore!

        (Thanks. I've been playing around with it sporadically throughout the week. I won't go into my issues with it because then it will seem like I'm just nit-picking, haha. Thank you, though)

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        • #64
          I haven't caught up with all the new posts, but gotta say ditto with chas's mentioning of trusting a bike shop more than the DME. If you have the cash, and tubes and work is MUCH cheaper at the bike shop as well, they will do a much better job. I posted recently about my saga. I have marathon plus tires on my "new" wheels and had a serious of flats due to incompetence on the part of the DME. They were not put together correctly and then when the DME came out with the part that was missing, the rim strips were badly damaged. I was able to use them for a week or two not noticing the slow leak before they popped when I tried to top off the air. Then I waited over TWO MONTHS for tubes to come in! I could have picked up two tubes for $8 at the bike shop a couple blocks away, but the timing was so shitty I couldn't spend the money, and when I started to consider it my roommate wasn't able to get the tires off my wheels anyway and I'm not able. (though they are difficult, many here change marathon plus tires themselves so don't let that part of my story scare you.) So the guy finally comes to change the tubes, and straight off I request he wrap extra rim tape around before putting the new tubes on. I had a hunch that was the problem. He says sure he will. Takes the wheels outside to his vehicle. I examine the tubes, and send my roommate out to show him the proof that the rim strip/tape was the cause of the flat, my roommate said he looked and agreed. He brings them back in, and when I ask he claims he'd put the extra rim tape on. Then one pops before he's even left, and he only has the 2 tubes with him that I'd waited 2 months for so HE drives down to the bike shop with the wheel and has them put the new tube on, and THEY (knowing what they were doing) saw the problem and replaced the rim strip. He comes back and I express concern about the second wheel. He assures me it will be fine. It blows maybe 30 minutes after he's gone. So then someone else comes, and he takes BOTH wheels down to the bike shop to have them completely examined to find the cause of the repeated flats.... The fucking rim strip of course, since they had already replaced the one they replaced the second and the DME was responsible for paying them. However if they had even listened to me and put extra rim tape on when I requested it, none of the rest would have happened. So I waited over 2 months and the bike shop was who fixed the problem anyway, at the cost of the DME after my insurance paid for the first 2 tubes and the first DME visit.

          Previous flats I'd bought tubes from this same bike shop and my roommate replaced them for me. The plan for if it happens again and I can't pay the bike shop to change the tubes, I'll still buy the tubes (well I plan to get some spares in advance) from the bike shop and only have a DME (which will be a different company, I switched after this shit) come immediately to just do the work and only under my observation. So, moral, DO NOT TRUST THE DME!
          Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

          I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by User Name View Post
            Can you imagine going to buy a car, and you test drive it, and you love it, and you tell them that is the care you want. And when it's delivered, you get a car that is kind-of-sort-of the car that you wanted, but without all of the things that made you love it in the first place, and all of the chances have been made at the dealer's discretion without asking for your input at all? And somehow you're in the wrong if you question the process?
            And that sort of shit happens constantly. In fact I see it all the time where people are complaining about their wheelchairs, and tell others not to buy a specific frame chair.... But the problem they have is actually with the other components on the chair. Like they hate the wheels, they hate the casters, they hate the brakes.... So don't buy X frame chair! But WAIT, none of that has anything to do with the frame/model. Or, the chair is too big, its too hard to push because the wheels are set so far back, Its so high off the ground..... So don't buy X frame chair! But they don't understand all the problems they hate are not the manufacturer or frame's fault, but due to the sizing and positioning choices that were made when the chair was ordered. Drives me nuts. In an ideal world the people you expect to be experts would be experts and perfectly speccing out every chair they sell. But of course thats not ever going to happen, because the business is more about money to them than customer service. Time is money, so extra time for training or to spend with clients isn't ok. Next best would be if everyone would educate themselves about such a life altering decision as what wheelchair they use and how its put together size and option wise. But I guess again time is money, its easier to blame the manufacturer.
            Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

            I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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            • #66
              The great CC tire debate: pneumatic vs. solids.

              This has been debated here for years and everyone has their own opinion and preference. You may have a difficult time making a decision, but it is your decision to make.

              Pneumatic tires with tubes are a little lighter than today's solid brands like Shox and Kik. Good ones can be filled to 145psi and have puncture proof belts made out of materials like lexan (the bulletproof vest plastic). Many people here like the way they ride. Air, even at high pressures gives a different feel over solid tires; some people say they really notice this. Pneumatics are pretty easy to change yourself, if you have good arm strength and are good with your hands mechanically. Schwables may be a little more difficult because they have a tight fit and a good strong band/bead. But they're worth it. Problem is they will leak. Slowly or suddenly, they will all eventually leak. Their pressure has to be maintained. And it is possible to get flats, even with the best tires, especially as they age and wear. If you're Ok with that then pneumatics might be just what you need. You can always switch to solids later; you will eventually need new tires in the future. You can always switch then.

              Solids can last a long time, need no maintenance, don't get flats, and come in colors. But they are very, and maybe prohibitively, difficult to mount or change. (I do it myself.) To do it right (without scratching your rims) you'll need specialized tools. *Example Many people with good upper-body strength, like me, don't find them any more difficult to push over pneumatics. Also, take into consideration that as pneumatic tires slowly lose pressure, they become more difficult to push. You may feel some difference over time with solids, as they wear down and the crown of the tire flattens, but solids stay pretty consistent.

              So see, here's another decision you must make. But don't worry you can always change from pneumatic to solid or back latter.

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              • #67
                You asked about push-rims. It is unlikely you will buy any wheels that don't use 6 tab handrims. Most can be interchanged between wheels, and it's not hard to do. I have even changed them without removing the tires; they were tires with solid inserts. But who does this? Most people who have more than one set of wheels keep the handrims with the wheels. Two sets of wheels - two sets of handrims.

                Handrims come in different materials like steel, aluminum, and yes, my favorite which I can't afford, titanium. They come in different shapes like standard round tube or ergonomic. I like both. They come in different finishes like conventionally painted, powder coated, rubber, and anodized.

                Again, choices for you to make. But again, they can be changed later. They will eventually get scratched or gouged and need replacing anyway, even if you like you wheels enough to keep them forever.

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                • #68
                  X2. if they don't roll in, then they don't have a clue.

                  Originally posted by Donno View Post
                  Don't agree to anything with any DME, and get everything in writing.
                  Bike-on.com rep
                  John@bike-on.com
                  c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                  sponsored handcycle racer

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                  • #69
                    Originally posted by fuentejps View Post
                    X2. if they don't roll in, then they don't have a clue.
                    This is certainly true. Some DMEs don't know their ass from the hole at the end of a camber tube.

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                    • #70
                      There is a lot of debate between titanium and aluminum, so I won't go into that here. It is often difficult if not impossible to get titanium chairs covered by Medicare/Medicaid or private insurance. HCPCS codes (Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System) are used for Durable Medical Equipment (DME) for Medicare and Medicaid to determine what is covered. Even if you have private insurance, most of them go by Medicare/Medicaid rules and ultimately use HCPCS codes to determine what is eligible. Aluminum Ultra Lightweights usually carry HCPCS K0005, while titanium carry K0009. Unless you have medical justification for titanium, you will probably be denied.

                      What I mentioned with the footrest is not shown as the "Anodized option" in the options brochure or on the website. You want to look at the what I mentioned in my post that shows the footrest tube (not just clamps) can also be provided in other colors. I don't have experience with this, but you could ask the dealer about it, or perhaps someone else knows.
                      Designs Unlimited Catalog http://www.tilite.com/documents/TiLi..._Unlimited.pdf which shows DU100087 Mixed Color Anodized Parts on page 56
                      A good online dealer can special order the LX hubs in black e.g., http://bike-on.com or http://www.sportaid.com.

                      Originally posted by User Name View Post
                      Thank you for your reply, elarson. I really appreciate it. Oh, by the way, my user name is User Name. I'm an ass.

                      The PDF of the completed order form is a great idea! Really, thanks for that.

                      The Aero Z order form from July 1st is the same one I've been using. I don't know enough to have an opinion on Titanium vs Aluminum. I just wanted to make sure one of them wasn't awful, or much better than the other.

                      I saw that Anodized option, too. It says that it covers the "footrest clamp," so who knows. If I ever get an answer, I'll let you know, haha.

                      Do you mind me asking where you were able to order the LX's with black spokes and black hubs? I tried looking around a bit but couldn't find anywhere that offered that option.
                      Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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                      • #71
                        indemedical.com lists it as a per wheel price. I made the same mistake once.

                        Many online dealers will also price match if you find it somewhere else cheaper. Be sure to ask.

                        Originally posted by User Name View Post
                        On the TiLite order form, the Twin-Star Exchange wheels are $895.

                        I just looked on indemedical.com and they have them for $289!

                        Is that real? Are they really that much cheaper and the same wheel? It looks as though that price is for 1, but even for the pair that's damn near $400 cheaper.
                        Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          I would order standard Shadows with the chair with a standard tire (or solids if they will cover it) with push rims. Order the Twin-Stars seperately with Marathon Plus tires. When I ordered Spinergy LX's from Sportaid I had them shipped with the Marathon Plus tires already installed. Swap out the push rims and you are ready to go with the Twin-Stars, but still have backup wheels and tires to use in a pinch. Relatively speaking, tires are cheap.

                          Check to make sure that the rims are compatible, and make sure you get tires of a similar profile on the Shadows and that the hub widths are compatible. Here is a long thread about a swapout from Shadows to Spinergy LX's. http:///forum/showthread.php?212503-...-Spinergy-LX-s

                          Originally posted by User Name View Post
                          So, let's say I buy those Twin-Stars from that site. They don't come with a tire and push rims already on them, correct? If not, which is what I assume, are you saying that chances are I will need to buy a second set of push rims for them, too? What's the easiest way to tell which push rims are compatible with which wheels before ordering them? Because, the push rims I'm looking at on that site don't specify any compatabilities.

                          The tires, yes, that was my plan. I was hoping I could get a relatively nice set through the DME/insurance, and then just have them taken off the stock wheels and put on whatever I buy. If not, I would buy separate tires of course, but the former would be cheaper.
                          Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

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                          • #73
                            I totally agree. Usually they put the most light wieght components on demo chairs, e.g., brakes, wheels, tires, etc., because what they are usually pitching is the weight. Do all of your own homework and assume that you are mostly on your own. When you have questions, post them here and to the dealer. Quite often the answers are not in sync. Even if it all takes longer, it's better than getting something you don't want or can't use or costs you a load of money.

                            Originally posted by User Name View Post
                            You know, the more I think about it, the more it pisses me off...
                            Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Just to be sure, I would check the TiLite e-parts store on this also.

                              Originally posted by chasmengr View Post
                              Great comment!
                              From Out-Front's order form: the Shadow and Gold Twin Star both use 6-pt tab mount handrims:
                              Partner of an incredible stroke survivor. Limitations: hemiparesis and neglect (functional paralysis and complete lack of awareness on one side). Equipment: TiLite ZRA 2 and 2GX, Spinergy ZX-1, RioMobility Firefly. Knowledge: relative newbie for high-level equipment (2012), but willing to try to help others who are new with similar limitations (definitely not a guru, but inquisitive).

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Originally posted by User Name View Post
                                Thanks, Andy. I appreciate it. I'm told I sit very well, but the strap back I have right now is amazingly uncomfortable. Part of me thinks a solid back would be much better, but then they did say that I just need a very small/short back, so I don't know.
                                It may be your current back setup is at the wrong angle or too narrow. I have two identical chairs, one has 15 inch backrest spacing for the uprights for the tension adjustable backrest and the other has 16 inch. All other dimensions match, only the width of the chairs are different. I love the 16 inch chair and can use it all day long, however I feel cramped in the 15 inch one and can not stay in it very long.
                                I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

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