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Bed to prevent and heal pressure sores

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  • Bed to prevent and heal pressure sores

    I am a c6/7 complete SCI and have successfully used a Somma waveless waterbed for many years. Recently I have developed some redness on my left ischium which I believe is in part due to my bed. I purchased a Sleep Number bed and tried it for 3 days. I found it to be very hard to breathe when lying on my side when the bed was set at a very low number like 30. My plan is to return it.

    Does anyone have good experience with Alternating Pressure Pump mattresses? Any manufacturer recommendations?

    As always thanks in advance for your comments.

  • #2
    I had a sleep number bed also and had no trouble with it. Try it increasing the conflation up to about 50 when you're on your side. Give it more time than three days to experiment to find the levels that you need.

    As for your second question he can actually go on eBay then do a search for low air loss mattress Shown here This similar to the one that I had which works very well
    C4 incomplete since 1985

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    • #3
      Ischial pressure is rare from a bed...it is a sitting surface, so nearly always caused by sitting, not doing weight shifts, poor posture, or the wrong cushion. Bed surfaces at risk are much more likely to be the sacrum, heels, and trochanters.

      Alternating pressure mattresses are based on poor science. Much better is a low air loss (LAL) pressure reducing surface, ideally a full mattress rather than an overlay.

      (KLD)
      The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by crppled007 View Post
        I had a sleep number bed also and had no trouble with it. Try it increasing the conflation up to about 50 when you're on your side. Give it more time than three days to experiment to find the levels that you need.

        As for your second question he can actually go on eBay then do a search for low air loss mattress Shown here This similar to the one that I had which works very well
        We also have a sleep number bed and like crippled we have had no issues with it...and have had it for 6 years. Since my husband and I are both disabled, we love the fact that we can change the pressure of the bed depending on our needs at the time. I agree that 3 days is not enough time. Try different settings. Eventually you will find the correct one.
        "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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        • #5
          We have Sleep Number beds too. No complaints. Even though the Sleep Number bed works great for me, I still prefer sleeping on a medical sheepskin, shoulders to just below upper thigh and under my heels.

          All the best,
          GJ

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          • #6
            I've been using a sleep number for 9 yrs with no issues. Mine is an older pump of course, but I notice a Big difference between a 30 setting and a 35 setting(my number), 30 is almost like a hammock in feeling and would bother me too. Try a 35 for a week or two and see if that works.
            "a T10, who'd Rather be ridin'; than rollin'"

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            • #7
              sleep number here too. new one. October we bought. love it. no redness anywhere at all. im a 40.
              Bike-on.com rep
              John@bike-on.com
              c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
              sponsored handcycle racer

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              • #8
                Alternating pressure is: A B cells inflating and deflating at different intervals to create movement thus promoting blood flow and pressure relief.

                Low air loss: is micro holes in the air bladders (mattress) consistently forcing airflow across the body, increasing the evaporation process on the skin.

                I personally like using both. Most companies sell units that do both. My go to product is the Invacare micro air line. (really expensive, but then all of the good ones are).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by jakeyboy1 View Post
                  Alternating pressure is: A B cells inflating and deflating at different intervals to create movement thus promoting blood flow and pressure relief.
                  There is no scientific evidence that this actually works as you describe. It is a claim made with no foundation.

                  The MicroAir 3500S mattress which is most likely the one you have is LAL, not alternating pressure.

                  (KLD)
                  The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  • #10
                    Is there evidence that Tempurpedic beds provide pressure relief. They have various foam densities and also an air bed (with foam). any body have experience with these as i am considering getting one of these vs Select Comfort

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                    • #11
                      I've been using a Roho overlay for 13 years and never had any problems. Very expensive though.

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