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Why do I need an icon??

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    Why do I need an icon??

    My 4th anniversary is quickly approaching, and with it the itch to buy a new chair.
    I like the icon concept, I like the design, I like the responsiveness of Jeff, and I dislike it's price.
    But the question that begs is: as an "advanced" wheelchair user, should I not go more towards fixed configuration lighter chairs rather than the uber modular and flexible icon?
    I would like to hear from the veterans out here on how (and IF) they would benefit from the adjustability of the icon.

    I am currently on a zra, and I did only a few adjustments over the past years...
    I am still not 100prc sure of what I actually need sine I have very little help and comparison grounds here in the UAE... But I want something light, sturdy, solid, comfy and that looks good.
    I am looking at:
    Panthera
    Oracing
    Tilite zr
    And of course the icon

    Can you guys help a brother out?


    Ck

    #2
    Originally posted by ckhouri View Post
    ... But I want something light, sturdy, solid, comfy and that looks good.
    I am looking at:
    Panthera
    Oracing
    Tilite zr
    And of course the icon

    Comment


      #3
      I have both a Zra and an Icon. Like you I hadn't made an adjustment to my Zra in over a year. I bought the Icon more for the suspension than the adjustability although it is nice to be able to adjust the back angle easily so that I am more relaxed sitting at my desk and tighter when I am out rolling around.

      Like toolely pointed out, there is a vast difference between the 3 chairs you listed and the Icon. A solid welded box frame is hard to compare to an Icon. All I can say is that I like my Icon and am glad I bought it. To me going from a Zra to a Zr would be nice but an incremental improvement. Buying an Icon means you have something completely different which is what I was looking for.

      FWIW my next chair will probably be a magnesium lasher, I would love to own a super light solid chair.

      Comment


        #4
        I'd go for an ORacing, if I could easily import one, off that list.
        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

        Comment


          #5
          My Icon is my first chair, so I am not going to try to compare anything. But I have found that the ability to adjust the back angle while still sitting in the chair is very useful for relieving strain. Kind of like adjusting a car seat just a bit on long rides.
          Played with bombs- No SCI, Brain Damage enough that I require a chair and a caregiver.

          Comment


            #6
            I have to add, I'd go for an ORacing because it's the one chair on the list, and mentioned by others, I don't already own.

            If I didn't already have a super light Mg, a fully adjustable air suspension, and an off the shelf, mass produced, adjustable chair, I would seriously consider adding an Icon to my stable.
            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

            "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by ckhouri View Post
              ... the question that begs is: as an "advanced" wheelchair user, should I not go more towards fixed configuration lighter chairs rather than the uber modular and flexible icon? ...
              Maybe you’ve answered your own question.

              Sounds like your ZRA’s fit and function have served you well the past 4 years. Evolving to a simple, lightweight ZR seems more sensible than jumping to a heavier, tweekable Icon – unless you have support needs that are in flux.

              FYI, 22.3# all-up, no-side-guards ZR here.

              Comment


                #8
                How high a priority is suspension?
                I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Not much of one, IMO. Nice, to be sure, but not necessary. Adds weight and complexity. Changes geometry of the chair when activated, also. Smooths out the thresholds nicely, and ramp transitions, notably. Curbs, goes without saying, but those are easy to avoid, generally.
                  "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                  "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                  Comment


                    #10
                    The adjustable casters is what I like. In fact I would want them even more adjustable so that you could easily flip them forward or back for outdoor or indoor use.
                    I have had periodic paralysis all my life. I lost my ability to walk in 2011 beginning with a spinal block, which was used for a hip fracture caused by periodic paralysis.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by tooley View Post
                      There is no such thing as a stupid question but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots. -modified from despair.com

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by nonoise View Post
                        The adjustable casters is what I like. In fact I would want them even more adjustable so that you could easily flip them forward or back for outdoor or indoor use.
                        You can, similar in concept to Lasher's BT-X.

                        Icon has made the "adjustability vs. no adjustability" discussion an issue of preference instead of "newbie vs. professional." Not everyone recognizes that.

                        People buy automobiles that have tons of flexibility, various seating/storage configurations, winter vs. summer wheels/tires, etc. Some people buy cars that have zero flexibility, fixed seats, and specific purposes. It's all about what someone finds beneficial.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          It will be a hard marketing problem to solve. It is the perfect chair for a persons first wheelchair because of it's flexibility and it would be foolish not to claim (and market to that demographic). However, I consider myself an "experienced" user and when I got my Icon I basically just sat it next to my Zra and matched it up to that and was good to go. Once every bolt is tightened down (and the bolts are quality ones, I will not be going to McMaster-Carr and replacing them like I did on my Zra) the chair is rock solid. No squeaks or give. However the reassurance and weight savings of a welded vs clamp/screw setup will be a hard thing to overcome from a marketing standpoint, and it will compounded by the "beginner chair thing".

                          It might be an idea to remove some of the adjustability and market a "Icon Pro" or something for that market.

                          ETA: I bought my Icon, I don't work for them or have any official or unofficial relationship with the company.

                          Originally posted by -scott- View Post
                          You can, similar in concept to Lasher's BT-X.

                          Icon has made the "adjustability vs. no adjustability" discussion an issue of preference instead of "newbie vs. professional." Not everyone recognizes that.

                          People buy automobiles that have tons of flexibility, various seating/storage configurations, winter vs. summer wheels/tires, etc. Some people buy cars that have zero flexibility, fixed seats, and specific purposes. It's all about what someone finds beneficial.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Essie View Post
                            the most important concepts in life are learned by the time we reach the first grade.

                            to the OP - if it will be the last chair you'll ever own buy the Icon. No matter how your body changes or the obstacles you face it is the most configurable chair on the market. If you do multiple car transfers a day (and have 30+ years left to live) don't even consider it. Wrestling it into the car will leave you wishing you spent your money on a PantheraX, Lasher BT-Mg or toto's new Oracing SL.

                            Good luck.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Weight: My personal chair weighs 22 pounds, all in, with wheels (Topolino wheels, carbon seat, no folding back, no sideguards, FrogLegs thin front wheels, carbon back).

                              The Icon is lighter than a similarly equipped ZRA, and my personal Icon is lighter than my own personal ZR (2005 model year) - we are VERY, VERY weight competitive when you compare similarly equipped chairs (even setting aside the fact that when I say similarly equipped chairs, I'm not even asking you to take into account that the Icon has suspension when none of the other superlight chairs do).

                              Suspension: The suspension is a game changer. I was injured in 1979. I've had back pain since 1979 1/2. Since I've had a chair with suspension, it's been a lot better. It's not gone, but the suspension makes a massive difference.

                              If suspension appeals to you (the Icon suspension works really, really well), then there is no other chair in the market that you should consider seriously.

                              Adjustability: If adjustability appeals to you, the Icon adjusts in more ways and in better ways than other chairs in the market do.

                              If adjustability doesn't speak to you, please consider that if you gain any weight, if you lose any weight, if you change your cushion for one that is thicker or thinner, your chair might not fit over time.

                              Also ask yourself if you think there might be a chance in a day or a week or a month or a year that you might want to try a different configuration, or put off-road wheels on the chair, or change the size of your front wheels, or sit with your feet a little more or a little less tucked under.....if there is any significant chance, the risk of getting a chair that can't change over time seems at least worth considering.

                              Modularity: It allows you to replace damaged components, or parts that have seen wear and tear (scratches on the castor arms for example) without having to weld, or send your whole frame back to be reworked.

                              If you buy the base chair (all standard parts, wire wheels, laminate seat etc) you can upgrade them over time to have all the bells and whistles.

                              If you buy the base level from any of the other manufacturers, you can never upgrade to their flagship model.

                              Customer service: Icon is owned and run by people who use wheelchairs. We will always go the extra mile because we understand how much of a difference equipment makes in people's lives.


                              Icon fits.

                              Comment

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