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got my forearm crutches

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    got my forearm crutches

    I have Millennial In-motion forearm crutches. They arrived a couple days ago. They're every bit as good as I'd hoped...a little chunkier than I'd anticipated, hand grips bigger around than I'd thought, but the suspension built in is epic....no more arm and wrist shock! I've taken to using one at a time, so I can lean on it and not stumble so much when the spazzes strike. Both together during dystonic twisting keep me pretty steady.
    All in all, I'm really impressed at how handy they are, and how much more comfortable they are than the hospital style I had initially demo'd, which gave me awful hand and arm pain within a few minutes of use. I'm glad got them when I did, since my chair's screwed up ATM. They're also decidedly easier to transport, and perfect for when I can walk but don't want to go without anything, either. And they fixed the hand/wrist pain issue I had with walking stick. I guess the thing with that was that the cane wasn't made to do that kind of weight bearing. Plus I can sort of let them drag/hang by the cuff on my elbow while I do something with my and, which is cool, since a cane is more of a pain in that scenario.
    Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

    #2
    I've had Millennial for years now...very pleased with them. I changed the tips to "Tornado" tips which further enhances my crutches

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      #3
      I went from the el crapos to Side stixs and what a difference a good pair makes. The ergonomic hand grips and tornado tips plus the shock absorbers really help. I lean on them pretty hard when walking, so I really needed a good pair. Glad you got some you like.
      T12L1 Incomplete Still here This is the place to be 58 years old

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        #4
        I also recommend the tornado tips

        The hand grips are much larger, but they ergonomic which is much better for your hands and wrists. Though the given left and right grips was a bit of a pain for me since I can only use a forearm crutch on my right side, I'm not able to use one with my left arm due to nerve damage. So I used one until the shock wore out, then swapped the right handed grip over to the other crutch to use that one.
        Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

        I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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          #5
          I had a decent attack earlier, and they kept me up! Otherwise, I'd have had to be in my chair. (Chair has a flat which is yet to be fixed....) Anyway, I love these things! I think I like using one at a time best, other than when I'm doing really badly like would be falling over without them, and then I need both.
          Last edited by voxina; 21 Apr 2013, 3:50 PM.
          Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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            #6
            How are the cuffs of forearm crutches supposed to fit? These are full cuff front opening, and they're pretty loose. I can stick the fingers of my hand through the extra space up to about the palm when I have my arm already in it.

            PS: Lin, how long was it before the shock wore out? I read on Millennial's website that the crutches have some kind of warranty. Maybe you could get it replaced?
            Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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              #7
              I think the warranty is something like a year, I bought mine in 2008 so I'm sure I'm beyond any warranty lol. They are a good company though and will work with you to order replacement parts. So I may try to replace the shock on the broken crutch at some point. I pretty much only use them at home now though since I use my chair when I leave.

              The cuff depends on how you want it. There are 2 cuff options I think when ordering them. If they're too loose and causing issues while using the crutches you can add in a padded liner. When I'm wearing tshirts the cuff is pretty loose but they don't slip or cause issues with me using the crutch, and then in the winter sometimes I can barely squish my arm with my coat into them. My first pair of forearm crutches were Euro open cuff and with those I had a really big problem and fell occasionally as a result. They were a step up from canes though lol, which I absolutely could not control. It would land all over the place, too far forward, too far to the side, not far enough forward... No matter how hard I concentrated. I only tried it for a weekend though, between that the wrist dislocations from all the weight on my hand I brought them back and we went to forearm crutches!
              Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

              I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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                #8
                Thanks for the advice, Lin. I ordered some pads, since I want it to be able to hold my arm more firmly. At times I have to walk with both to be able to move on one foot, and their being loose makes me wobbly. And other times I'd like to be able to use my hand with my arm supporting some of my weight, which isn't possible given their being bigger than my forearm. Overall they work great--last night I was able to bring in groceries even though without them I would hardly have been able to walk!
                Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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                  #9
                  For their warranty, my 1st pair got all rusted out...I use the in and around salt water a lot! They sent me a new pair for $35.

                  I also had a pair Euro's. Yes they are unstable but I actually got used to their quirks and liked them a lot....they are so lite

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                    #10
                    Lin, this EDSer can't use anything other than full cuff crutches either. I can't even work out how people use half cuff and sticks. My hands and wrists just won't do it!

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                      #11
                      I have some sort of mild connective tissue defects, or anyways, hypermobile joints. Cane use makes my wrist ache pretty badly. I can't imagine that everyone who uses a cane does so with so much strain. Could this be part of the connective tissue thing?

                      Funny, I can put tons of weight on my one hand with my forearm crutch (ergonomic) and it doesn't begin to hurt like my cane hand did.
                      Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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                        #12
                        It depends how unstable your wrist/hand joints are. Many hypermobile people seem to manage canes but I've never been able to do it. My physiotherapist gave me one initially and I didn't even get to leave with it. Straight to crutches for me! It should have been a wheelchair though...

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                          #13
                          I've never dislocated anything, and haven't had any serious orthopedic problems. I did have a lot of PT early in life due to coordination disorder, IDK if all that could have done any good? They told me I was really tight in the muscles of my legs, but I also am really "loose" in terms of sort of....floppy in terms of when doing things. Or I overdo and sort of, tense up too much. Little in between. The cane thing hurt my hands tho. The crutches are better. Not perfect, but better. My ultralight Ti is effortless, though. No worrying about spazzing. I was at a street fair yesterday, and even jumped a few small curbs. (Four inches or less I can manage.) I'm doing better now so I'm trying to stick with the crutches, but the chair gives me a feeling of freedom nothing else does, since I'm always second guessing everything my body does.
                          Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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                            #14
                            Hello everyone! did anyone here ever hear of smart crutches? i use a walker now but a friend ordered smart crutches, she said trid them and liked them. i seen a picture and they looked bulkie, i am 5ft tall she is pretty much taller so mabe thats why looked to bulkie. i walk far on my walker but i am depending on it way to much, i am no way ready with balance for a cane. she said c rutches might be the change i need for more balance. thanks

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                              #15
                              I'm not SCI, and so I don't know specifics about SCI type rehab, but crutches, in general, will offer a good bit more support than a cane. They can take heavier weight bearing, as well, and feel more stable in your grip, if that makes sense, than canes. But they also require a lot more coordination, balance, and arm and core strength, than a walker. IE, if you're putting a lot of pressure on the crutches to take a step, and one of them sort of slips to the side, you can lose your balance, and may fall. You have to be able to keep them firm on the floor/in line to support much weight.
                              I've only been using mine about a week, but I can already say that it's definitely easier if you're able to take steps, and brace yourself with the crutches, vs doing a swing thru technique, in terms of balance, strength, etc. I use a variety of gaits depending on my needs any given moment, since involuntary movements can change my posture and range of motion continually.

                              Talking with a PT would probably be a good idea, for pointers on how to use them best for you, and to get fitted. IMHO, it will probably serve you well to get good quality crutches rather than hospital style ones...same sorta way you get better use from a higher end chair. It's just lighter, better for your joints, etc. I can't use hospital style ones, arm pain within minutes. For me the millenials seem perfect, and I love the shock absorption.
                              Tourette's Syndrome - motor tics of the legs, feet and back, which can make it difficult or impossible to walk

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