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    Pressure Mapping Beneficial?

    For those of you who have pressure mapping for a cushion done, was it beneficial? Explain.

    Did you end up getting the cushion recommended? Why or why not?

    How much did it cost?

    Thank you,
    E

    PS Can you tell I'm a teacher?
    There is no such thing as a stupid question but there sure are a lot of inquisitive idiots. -modified from despair.com

    #2
    Ive never had it done either so im also curious.

    Comment


      #3
      Waiting to be scheduled and hopeful it makes a difference with the next cushion. I'm also curious about the cost. Insurance said they will pay, 80/20. We'll see.

      Great questions, teacher!
      Incomplete, SCI, T1-T8, w/ Arachnoid Cyst. Bilateral shoulder surgeries, 2 on the left, 3 on the right, right forearm surgery for a crushed radial nerve.

      "We can always choose to perceive things differently. We can focus on what's wrong in our life, or we can focus on what's right."
      — Marianne Williamson

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        #4
        I had it done last year for around $300. I was using on a stimulite but also brought my roho high profile and jay active (I think) with me. The guy didn't seem to have full knowledge of the software from what I gathered but we worked through it. I was mapped sitting on the cushions, sitting on a bed, laying flat on my back on the bed, laying flat with one leg bent in the shape of a "A", and I had him map me while in the driver's seat of my vehicle. While being mapped in my chair, I tried shifting around in different positions. The pressure from the stimulite was substantially more than the roho. The roho was around 1-2 psi (ischial area) and dropped below one if I leaned forward a little while resting both hands on the downtube. We decided that I should be using the roho quadtro because of it's flexibility in regulating pressure. Even if the values were off by 50%, I at least confirmed what my body was telling me, the roho out performed. BTW, insurance didn't cover the cost but it was worth it.

        Comment


          #5
          I thought this article did a good job and explaining pressure mapping and it's benefits.

          http://sci.washington.edu/info/forum...essure_map.asp
          -ResonantEcho - T6/T7 Complete - October 31st, 1986

          Comment


            #6
            In the process right now. Had my low profile roho mapped and it went through the roof (wonder why I got a sore). Going back on the 23rd to map a jay fusion and get a shape capture for a custom Ride. Will map the Ride once it comes in.
            Cost is free

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              #7
              Pressure mapping only is beneficial if you are properly fitted in your chair.
              For example: I can take any chair with any cushion and adjust the footplate up 2" and cause "bad mapping". Or, I can change the back angle and achieve the same bad result.

              Another thing to factor: If you are trying different thickness cushions, you have to adjust the footrests with each cushion before you map it.

              I'm not against mapping..... just saying it is only useful if properly done.

              Comment


                #8
                I went in and had some mapping down last month more for my seating position than a new cushion, my ROHO does ok. My Jay Active gave me a sore years ago so I switched to ROHO but because of poor posture after 30 years of active living in a chair I needed to adjust how I sit in the chair. If insurance will pay I suggest going because pressure mapping lets us see what our butt feels.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Had it done after 20 years of sitting on 2 inch foam....turns out every expensive cushion showed a red area. My 2 inch foam (100 bucks) all blue.
                  My appt. was with an OT, paid through insurance.
                  Get involved in politics as if your life depended on it, because it does. -- Justin Dart

                  I shall not tolerate ignorance or hate speech on this site.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jakeyboy1 View Post
                    Pressure mapping only is beneficial if you are properly fitted in your chair.
                    For example: I can take any chair with any cushion and adjust the footplate up 2" and cause "bad mapping". Or, I can change the back angle and achieve the same bad result.

                    Another thing to factor: If you are trying different thickness cushions, you have to adjust the footrests with each cushion before you map it.

                    I'm not against mapping..... just saying it is only useful if properly done.
                    I agree 100%.

                    Also, be mindful of some cushions that can soften and wear out a little over time.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm not a fan at all. 28 years never had it. I feel it lulls ppl into a false sense of security. some of the worst pressure sores I've seen here, and on ppl who keep talking about pressure mapping.

                      listen to your body and check you skin daily.

                      as Jake and Scott pointed out, anything can change the pressure, heck even different shoes.
                      Bike-on.com rep
                      John@bike-on.com
                      c4/5 inc funtioning c6. 28 yrs post.
                      sponsored handcycle racer

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I got pressure mapping done once when i kept getting presure sores. No I didn't go with the cushion they recommended. I actually went with 2 different cushions. And have been able to keep them down. My doctor put me on a stimulite classic xs cushion and I haven't had issues since. If I forget to shift my weight ill get some redness now but nothing major. I also use varilite. I change my chushions around.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Pressure mapping is a tool that provides information that you otherwise would not have, to aid in the decision making process. It is a good way to visualize how a cushion is working to distribute forces, and usually you can readily see if the ischials or sacrum are bearing too much of the seated load. It also certainly aids in the comparison of one seating surface to another.
                          Beyond the obvious, pressure mapping can help determine the best set up for the combination of mobility base and seating system. How much dump is too much? What tilt angle do you need to reach to relieve most of the pressure from your ischials? What is the impact at your ischial or sacral area of increasing the angle of your backrest? What is the ideal adjustment for your air / fluid cushion? And a number of similar questions.
                          One suggestion I offer is to take advantage of pressure mapping for a variety of seating surfaces that you use on a daily basis, such as seated in your car, seated on a shower commode seat, seated in your hand cycle, etc. I have found that frequently these surfaces can be overlooked when it comes to skin protection.
                          I think it is also important to recognize what pressure mapping doesn't do. It doesn't let you see what is happening beneath the surface of the skin, which is obviously where tissue trauma occurs. It also doesn't really give an indication of shear forces, which can be a significant risk factor related to tissue trauma. The point of this is that pressure mapping alone is not a know-all, see-all tool. It just provides additional information to help in the overall assessment process.
                          My opinion - if you are paying (or your insurance is paying) for a clinical seating assessment, you should request that pressure mapping be part of the assessment. You will learn something from it, and you have that one additional piece of information when making decisions.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Yes, I've had great experiences with pressure mapping. Just recently I pressure mapped 6 different cushions with very different results. I have very prominent I.T's so mapping is a crucial tool for me in choosing the proper cushion (as the pressure was very high on cushions that appeared comfortable).
                            On the advice of a senior member I mapped the Roho Quadtro Select (high profile) and it proved to relieve the most pressure by a landslide.
                            I did end up ordering it and as my health care covers it, I can't provide you with a price. (Check the Roho website).

                            Comment


                              #15
                              In the UK we can get this done for free from our local wheelchair services; after cancer surgery I lost over 4 stone (56lbs) and was literally sat on the bones of my butt due to the loss of padding? Had a Jay2 and the mapping showed two high pressure areas.
                              Changed to a Jay3 which gave better results and using all of the other methods - regular lifts,position changes, skin monitoring etc I am managing very well.
                              Just my opinion but I think it is definitely worthwhile, as long as you don't then assume that you will be fine without taking all of the other precautions to protect yourself, as it can give you a false sense of security?

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