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15x17+1.5 80 Degree TiLite TR3

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    #16
    Those would be the weights of the frames and wheels with sideguards and back upholstery removed.

    Weight is, indeed, arbitrary.
    Last edited by SCI_OTR; 4 Feb 2013, 2:25 PM. Reason: Received updated information

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      #17
      is anyone else bothered by the messy backpost/seatrail arrangement on the tr? one of the most aesthetically attractive things about tilite is its caster fork design, something thats not really replicated by other designers. but then the 'two separate elements welded together' arrangement for the fixed backrest is just plain ugly and incongruous. comparisons in that area between the tr in post 1 and the terminator in post 8 are huge.
      Last edited by amyk; 5 Feb 2013, 3:04 PM.

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        #18
        Originally posted by amyk View Post
        is anyone else bothered by the messy backpost/seatrail arrangement on the tr? one of the most aesthetically attractive things about tilite is its caster fork design, something thats not really replicated by other designers. but then the 'two separate elements welded together' arrangement for the fixed backrest is just plain ugly and incongruous. comparisons in that area between the tr in post 1 and the terminator in post 8 are huge.
        Agreed. The lower rail flowing up to the backpost as one continuous line is much nicer looking. IIRC, the Xtreme Box is also done this way.

        A cantilevered frame made from one perimeter tube (from the top of one backrest, down along the side, into the down tubes, around the footrest, and back to the top of the other back rest cane) would be neat, IMO.
        "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

        "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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          #19
          Originally posted by DaleB View Post

          A cantilevered frame made from one perimeter tube (from the top of one backrest, down along the side, into the down tubes, around the footrest, and back to the top of the other back rest cane) would be neat, IMO.
          Your wish was Todd's command. (A one-off, I'm sure.)


          stephen@bike-on.com

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            #20
            Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
            Your wish was Todd's command. (A one-off, I'm sure.)


            Yes! Love it.

            Add the footrest to the mix and then it'd be exactly what I'm thinking.

            Fewer pieces = my style.

            Parsimony in motion!
            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

            "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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              #21
              Originally posted by DaleB View Post
              Yes! Love it.

              Add the footrest to the mix and then it'd be exactly what I'm thinking.

              Fewer pieces = my style.

              Parsimony in motion!
              Halls did it this way -- one super-long piece of tubing including footrest -- but the downside to that is that if you change to a cushion that's taller/shorter you can't compensate the footrest height. Also, the footrest is a source of very high wear among some users, so it's nice to know that you could replace it rather than replacing the whole chair. For all of the above reasons you'll never see any of the big players offer this as an option.
              stephen@bike-on.com

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                #22
                Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                Halls did it this way -- one super-long piece of tubing including footrest -- but the downside to that is that if you change to a cushion that's taller/shorter you can't compensate the footrest height. Also, the footrest is a source of very high wear among some users, so it's nice to know that you could replace it rather than replacing the whole chair. For all of the above reasons you'll never see any of the big players offer this as an option.

                I use my footrest to balance during car disassembly/transfers and it definitely gets very scratched, under the front. I wouldn't mind, personally, but it would also depend on the type of metal.

                For my mileage, I think it would work well, understanding the compromises you point out.

                I guess I'll just have to learn how to bend tube!

                "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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                  #23
                  yes, either backpost --> seatrail (like todds zr cantilever) or backrest --> lower rail (like terminator box frame). it looks so much better. my old rgk was like that too... tilite already do a one-piece side rail for the tx, so i dont know the reason for such a clumsy design.

                  it looks as though you could replicate todds effect by using the elements from an ordinary folding titanium back. separate the parts and remove the hardware. bend the ends of the back into 90 degrees and using a smaller diameter tube to go inside and hold them together, butt together the backpost and the seat rail. adjust the cog and seat sling as necessary. you can locate the pins where you cant see them...

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by amyk View Post
                    tilite already do a one-piece side rail for the tx, so i dont know the reason for such a clumsy design.
                    Am I the only one who thinks that TX round back is good looking but not so good to use?
                    It creates one inch gap between the backrest and the seat, my cushion is not fully backward and I can feel it, I will probably try to cut corners of an old cushion to see if it fixes the issue.

                    So I'm OK for round design as long I have a square angle between my backrest and seat and this is what the topend does as far as I can see but not the TX.
                    My TR3

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                      #25
                      The 1" gap is needed to make room for the back upholstery when folding the frame.

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                        #26
                        Right but the fact that the backrest bottom is round prevents the cushion from going fully backwards at the vertical of the back posts.
                        My TR3

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by amyk View Post
                          is anyone else bothered by the messy backpost/seatrail arrangement on the tr? ...but then the 'two separate elements welded together' arrangement for the fixed backrest is just plain ugly and incongruous. comparisons in that area between the tr in post 1 and the terminator in post 8 are huge.
                          I'm sure Doug Garven would have loved for the back post, seat rail and lower frame rail to converge together seamlessly on the TR3. Sure it doesn't look as elegant from the side, but keep in mind that you are looking at it in just two dimensions. Remember, in addition to having the curved rear frame, the lower frame rail also tapers inward. Technically, it probably isn't feasible given that each frame is built to different specifications.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by DaleB View Post
                            Agreed. The lower rail flowing up to the backpost as one continuous line is much nicer looking.
                            .
                            Agreed too, i can understand the actual desing for someone who order the chair with a folding backrest, but why do it like that for someone who want a fixed backrest? doing it like this will give to the customer even a greater range of the COG adjustment and of course the chair would look cooler imo and save the work to do two welds and two cuts
                            Last edited by totoL1; 6 Feb 2013, 7:46 AM.

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                              #29
                              looks better than mine

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by SCI_OTR View Post
                                I'm sure Doug Garven would have loved for the back post, seat rail and lower frame rail to converge together seamlessly on the TR3. Sure it doesn't look as elegant from the side, but keep in mind that you are looking at it in just two dimensions. Remember, in addition to having the curved rear frame, the lower frame rail also tapers inward. Technically, it probably isn't feasible given that each frame is built to different specifications.
                                If Top End and ORacing can incorporate this design (and manufacturing) element, TiLite could too. There had to be a constraint on the TiLite design or mfg process, IMO. It is technically possible, evidenced by it having been done.

                                The inset tubes bend back to same width as the frame at the rear.

                                Would one more bend have really blown the whole design and/or mfg process?

                                Really?!?
                                "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                                "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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