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Oracing combines carbon fiber and titanium in a new way

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    #16
    Originally posted by The_Wheel_Life View Post
    As for the carbon/titanium conundrum... Personally, I don't think carbon is a good material for everyday wheelchairs. Does anyone remember the all-carbon Quickie that was around several years back? Most everyday chairs get a lot of bumps and bruises. Carbon just doesn't stand up well to that kind of use. The main reason to blend carbon and titanium would be for aesthetic purposes. I remember working on a high-end Merlin road bike that had a creaky frame! The noise was coming from one of the titanium lugs that had a carbon tube going into it.
    CF when designed and used properly is superior in every way. That's why it's used in F1, Indycar, Nascar. Just about every type of high performance sport. And they don't go kid gloves on their CF parts.
    ---------
    C5-6 / '88

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      #17
      Originally posted by Reed-edm View Post
      CF when designed and used properly is superior in every way. That's why it's used in F1, Indycar, Nascar. Just about every type of high performance sport. And they don't go kid gloves on their CF parts.
      As CF becomes more prevalent in future wheelchair designs (an assumption on my part) how will first generation consumers assess whether the CF was designed and used properly?

      What's your take on the Panthera-X? A friend of mine bought one recently and I learned that the rim on the custom Spinergy wheel exclusive to the Panthera-X cut severely bent while he was dropping off a curb. He's also reported a failure of the one-lever wheel lock system.
      stephen@bike-on.com

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        #18
        Mountain biking is going through the same process right now. Back in the 90's they built some terrible cf frames that were way too lite and failed which gave it a terrible reputation. The new frames are way superior and pretty much all have a sacrificial cosmetic outer layer that takes the scratches and chips without affecting the underlying strength. I road cf bikes exclusively the last couple years and they took 100 times the abuse any of my chairs ever will with no failures whatsoever. Loading and unloading a chair isn't the same as pitching a bike down a rock chute as far as impact and abrasion. Any crash that destroys a well built cf frame would have destroyed an aluminum frame faster.

        If you want to see some clear measured and documented demonstrations of the superior strength and toughness of a cf frame read this article and watch the first video to the end where they smash a cf frame into a concrete block without any damage.
        http://www.pinkbike.com/news/santa-c...-test-lab.html
        T4 Complete since 01/01/2012

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          #19
          Originally posted by The_Wheel_Life View Post
          That is exactly the reason I'll never go back to a cantilever frame (only had one of 'em.) After using a box frame, the canti feels like a wet noodle.
          .
          You are a bit exaggerate lol, but yes, that usually happens, people that try box frames, usually never go back to cantilevers again.

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            #20
            Originally posted by gmorris View Post
            Mountain biking is going through the same process right now. Back in the 90's they built some terrible cf frames that were way too lite and failed which gave it a terrible reputation. The new frames are way superior and pretty much all have a sacrificial cosmetic outer layer that takes the scratches and chips without affecting the underlying strength. I road cf bikes exclusively the last couple years and they took 100 times the abuse any of my chairs ever will with no failures whatsoever. Loading and unloading a chair isn't the same as pitching a bike down a rock chute as far as impact and abrasion. Any crash that destroys a well built cf frame would have destroyed an aluminum frame faster.

            If you want to see some clear measured and documented demonstrations of the superior strength and toughness of a cf frame read this article and watch the first video to the end where they smash a cf frame into a concrete block without any damage.
            http://www.pinkbike.com/news/santa-c...-test-lab.html

            Bike riders are lucky that they get to have all of that cool carbon stuff. Such are the luxuries of using mass production! Carbon stuff keeps getting better and better, but very little of it is custom one-off work. Of course, there are some independent carbon frame builders, but most of them use tubes and lugs. Not too many out there doing custom mold work for one or two frames. The setup necessary for making ONE SIZE of ONE MODEL for ONE MANUFACTURER (of bikes) probably costs $20,000 in tooling. It'll be tough to effectively incorporate that technology into everyday chairs. Even the one-size-fits-all carbon handcycles cost over $10K. It would be tough to make all-carbon everyday chairs in just a S, M, and L.

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              #21
              I use a process similar to a tube and lug design for my carbon chairs. With a product that requires such a wide range of geometries, it's really the best chance for affordable custom carbon wheelchairs. Are you going to be able to realize the absolute maximum potential that composite construction could deliver in a wheelchair frame? No. Can you still produce a frame that outperforms the lead sleds that are currently avalable? Absolutely.

              I'm kind of terrified to see what may end up on the shelves when tradition metal chair makers try their hands at composites. I'll do my best to keep that from happening.

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