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    #31
    Originally posted by reaton View Post
    Salamero…….thanks for the compliments and your explanation. Yes, I have a tippy chair with quite a bit of dump that allows me to jump these curbs…….19” front height and 14” rear height. But, being 56 years old and 36 years post with a lot of athletics in those 36 years, my shoulders are breaking down. I just assumed in a few years I would go to power assist wheels then to an electric chair when I get into my 60s. But, after reading about your rowheels it looks like I can get a few more years out of my shoulders. Can’t wait to see these get to the market.

    Ronnie
    Ronnie,

    That is the goal of Rowheels! To relieve pain and mitigate shoulder problems in users experiencing those problems as well as to keep those problems from happening to wc users who aren't having those issues yet. If we can do this while keeping you healthy and active in your manual chair, then mission accomplished!

    This is why I am working so hard to make sure that Rowheels will follow through on its promise of being a better way to propel yourself in your chair. It's why I'm pushing so hard to make sure they are as reliable, lightweight, ergonomic and affordable as possible.

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      #32
      One question. Right now we are designing a 25" wheel. How important would you say it is that we offer 25"AND 24"?

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by salamero View Post
        One question. Right now we are designing a 25" wheel. How important would you say it is that we offer 25"AND 24"?
        I think it is pretty important from reading this board I get the impression that a lot of people have the 25's you will have to crunch the numbers but my guess is that it would give you a significantly bigger market place...IMO. I have one set of 25's but mainly use 24's limiting to one size or the other, IMO, would be a mistake.

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          #34
          Originally posted by djrolling View Post
          I think it is pretty important from reading this board I get the impression that a lot of people have the 25's you will have to crunch the numbers but my guess is that it would give you a significantly bigger market place...IMO. I have one set of 25's but mainly use 24's limiting to one size or the other, IMO, would be a mistake.
          Agreed. We've made the necessary changes to make the hub compatible with both sizes.
          Last edited by salamero; 1 Sep 2012, 10:11 AM.

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            #35
            Originally posted by salamero View Post
            They will be a little bit wider, yes. And yes, they will have finger guards.No multi speed yet but if we are successful, fingers crossed, I have lots of ideas for new features.
            I went back and checked and each Rowheel adds 3.4" of width to your chair so if your chair frame is 18" wide, it would be about 25" wide with Rowheels.

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by salamero View Post
              One question. Right now we are designing a 25" wheel. How important would you say it is that we offer 25"AND 24"?
              I'm not positive you will know the answer to this question until you begin user testing with a version that closely resembles the production version.

              To date, the collective experience of both end users and researchers has been with traditional propulsion techniques (i.e.the push stroke). A pull stroke is largely uncharted territory and is complete paradigm shift.

              A 22" version might have greater significance than a 25" version if the smaller size would provide better propulsion for younger users with conditions like cerebral palsy. While my professional experience is almost exclusively with adults having SCI, ALS, or MS, I do wonder if a pull stroke would be beneficial than a push stroke for a young user with abnormal tone and poor trunk control. If they need to have custom molded seating seating and a seating system that is in a posterior orientation, pulling back on the hand rim in order to move forward may allow them to self-propel without coming out of their seating system. I'm just speculating, but soliciting input from a pediatric seating specialist may prove to be extremely useful while you are still in the design & development phase.

              My impression from what I have seen so far is that Rowheel would appeal most to quads who want to use a manual wheelchair. I could envision them being used by paras as well, but only a relatively small subset who have already developed upper extremity overuse symptoms. I believe that active C5-7 quads are your early adopters, but that active paras are likely to perceive it as something that isn't relevant to them personally (until they actually develop overuse symptoms).

              If this assessment of your target market proves to be accurate, your disclosure that you are unable to use them yourself struck me as a bit of an "orange flag".

              Have you discussed the Rowheel with Rachel Cowan at The Miami Project (formerly from HERL)? She has done a lot of research into self-propulsion and was instrumental in developing the SMARTWheel database. She is also a full-time manual chair user herself.
              Last edited by SCI_OTR; 1 Sep 2012, 12:18 PM.

              Comment


                #37
                I would also recommend that you provide a sample to the staff at the University of Pittsburg Human Engineering Research Labs (Michael Boninger, MD) for further evaluation of their ergonomic benefits. They are the experts in the field of wheelchair push ergonomics: http://www.herl.pitt.edu

                (KLD)
                The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                  #38
                  Originally posted by SCI_OTR View Post
                  I'm not positive you will know the answer to this question until you begin user testing with a version that closely resembles the production version.

                  To date, the collective experience of both end users and researchers has been with traditional propulsion techniques (i.e.the push stroke). A pull stroke is largely uncharted territory and is complete paradigm shift.

                  A 22" version might have greater significance than a 25" version if the smaller size would provide better propulsion for younger users with conditions like cerebral palsy. While my professional experience is almost exclusively with adults having SCI, ALS, or MS, I do wonder if a pull stroke would be beneficial than a push stroke for a young user with abnormal tone and poor trunk control. If they need to have custom molded seating seating and a seating system that is in a posterior orientation, pulling back on the hand rim in order to move forward may allow them to self-propel without coming out of their seating system. I'm just speculating, but soliciting input from a pediatric seating specialist may prove to be extremely useful while you are still in the design & development phase.

                  My impression from what I have seen so far is that Rowheel would appeal most to quads who want to use a manual wheelchair. I could envision them being used by paras as well, but only a relatively small subset who have already developed upper extremity overuse symptoms. I believe that active C5-7 quads are your early adopters, but that active paras are likely to perceive it as something that isn't relevant to them personally (until they actually develop overuse symptoms).

                  If this assessment of your target market proves to be accurate, your disclosure that you are unable to use them yourself struck me as a bit of an "orange flag".

                  Have you discussed the Rowheel with Rachel Cowan at The Miami Project (formerly from HERL)? She has done a lot of research into self-propulsion and was instrumental in developing the SMARTWheel database. She is also a full-time manual chair user herself.
                  Thanks for the feedback SCI-OTR.

                  We are going to offer 24" and 25" size wheels because they are, to my knowledge, the two most popular sizes.

                  I agree that pulling instead of pushing involves a big paradigm shift on behave of the wheelchair community by I think the premise is sound. What are you opinions on the expected bio-mechanical benefits listed on the site?

                  I have been thinking about a pediatric sized Rowheel but wasn't sure whether to go with 20" or 22" wheels. I know the Wijit uses 20" for their kids size wheels.

                  We will be having a small scale user and clinician study performed in collaboration with Georgia Tech's wheeled mobility lab and The Shepherd Center.This will give us a good amount of data and feedback that will let us know if we are on the right track or not.


                  As for our target audience, I saw the following groups as potential Rowheels users:
                  - High functioning quads C-6/7. I didn't include C5s such as myself because we typically require knobs on the push rims. The truth is that I had paras try the initial rowheels and didn't try it myself because I didn't think I could use it. I could be wrong.
                  -Paras with shoulder and/or wrist injury and pain.
                  -Active and healthy users with fully functioning upper extremities that want to reduce their risk of future shoulder/wrist issues and/or want the performance enhancements associated with the gear ratio.

                  I have had several conversations with Dr. Cowen, both in person and over the phone, and she has given me valuable insight into these issues.I inquired about having a user study through the Miami Project but I wouldn't be possible until next summer. We'll see, there are other options such as Rancho Los Amigos in LA.
                  Last edited by salamero; 1 Sep 2012, 7:04 PM.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by SCI-Nurse View Post
                    I would also recommend that you provide a sample to the staff at the University of Pittsburg Human Engineering Research Labs (Michael Boninger, MD) for further evaluation of their ergonomic benefits. They are the experts in the field of wheelchair push ergonomics: http://www.herl.pitt.edu

                    (KLD)
                    I have been in talks with UPitts HER lab on the RESNA durability testing their lab performs. I have not approached Dr. Boninger but I'm adding it to my to-do list. Thanks.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      I'm really interested in an up to date video so I can get a look at the hand and wrists during use. I wear wrist braces, and also have peripheral nerve damage that limits my use along the ulnar side. I'm a newer chair user (dont use it for sci) and use natural fit lts currently.
                      Board Member of Assistance Dog Advocacy Project working in Education. Feel free to ask me any service dog questions!

                      I am not paralyzed. I have a genetic connective tissue disorder with neuro complications and a movement disorder.

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                        #41
                        maybe i'm not the norm but i've been a c/6/7 quad for 11 yrs. i push on the tire, i don't use the handrims at all. so they wouldn't work for me.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Originally posted by ~Lin View Post
                          I'm really interested in an up to date video so I can get a look at the hand and wrists during use. I wear wrist braces, and also have peripheral nerve damage that limits my use along the ulnar side. I'm a newer chair user (dont use it for sci) and use natural fit lts currently.
                          We will have new video next month.Right now we are finalizing the beta prototype design so they can be used at MedTrade.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by rollin64 View Post
                            maybe i'm not the norm but i've been a c/6/7 quad for 11 yrs. i push on the tire, i don't use the handrims at all. so they wouldn't work for me.
                            Sure there would be an adjustment period but you shouldn't dismiss Rowheels solely because you are used to pushing on the wheel. Your level of injury is a good candidate for Rowheels and could benefit greatly from its use. We also plan on offering Q-Grip hand rims as option.

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                              #44

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                                #45
                                We are done with the Beta design. We have sent all the components out to be manufactured...This is what they will look like!

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