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Sterilizing piston syringe for catheter irrigation

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    Sterilizing piston syringe for catheter irrigation

    As a caregiver for my father, I need to irrigate his catheter daily. His insurance co. will not pay for the piston syringe so we need to re-sterilize daily.

    I was placing the parts in boiling water for 15 minutes, but the coating on the rubber tip wears off. A nurse suggested boiling for only 10 minutes but that coating is still showing wear.

    Any ideas on how to re-sterilize including that rubber tip and not lose that coating?

    Thanks!
    !
    Last edited by lacath; 26 Apr 2012, 3:38 PM.

    #2
    I have done a search of the Care Cure Community for you. Go to this link to read the threads that have been written on this subject:
    http://www.google.com/search?q=steri...w=1335&bih=624

    All the best,
    GJ

    Comment


      #3
      The out of pocket cost might not be practical for you but I have found it easier and a lot less work buying new Syringes. I pay $9.00 for a box of 25 plus S&H.

      I have been getting 60cc sterile syringes ( they have many sizes & types) from this Vet supply company for about three years. reliable and good to do business with.

      http://www.shopmedvet.com/category/vet-syringe

      Comment


        #4
        What are you using to irrigate the bladder? If you are using Vetericyn, there is no need to sterilize the syringes. Just rinse and let dry on paper toweling until the next time you instill Vetericyn. Vetericyn will kill bacteria in the syringe. I always use an alcohol wipe on the outside of the tip before and after I instill Vetericyn.

        If you are unfamiliar with Vetericyn instillations to help prevent colonization and urinary tract infections, here are some threads and information for your to read and study.

        /forum/showthread.php?t=133414
        /forum/showthread.php?t=149966
        /forum/showthread.php?t=143797
        /forum/showthread.php?t=167480

        http://vetericyn.com/technology/faq.php

        On the subject of "sterilizing: the syringes, they are never going to be sterile, even after you boil them because you can't store them in sterile packaging. With any of several cleaning methods, i.e., bleach, alcohol, soap and water, boiling, you will have clean technique syringes, but they won't be sterile.

        All the best,
        GJ

        All the best,
        GJ

        Comment


          #5
          Why do you need to irrigate the catheter daily? This actually increases the risks for infection. Irrigation should be reserved for an emergency such as the catheter clogging or blood in the urine.

          If you use a 60 cc. catheter-tipped plastic plunger syringe, you can separate these and wash in the dishwasher. They won't be sterile, but they will be very clean...certainly clean enough for use for indwelling catheter irrigation in the home setting. Do the same with the container you use to pour the solution (normal saline?) into before irrigating.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


            #6
            Thanks to all for such helpful info! This is really important to me. I'll need a little time to absorb it and ask questions.

            GJ, Thanks for the helpful link! Looks like a lot of good info there. I will check out the links for the Vetericyn instillations. That is all new to me.

            Chesbay, Have you been using the syringes for irrigating a catheter for a person? That sounds like a great way to save on the expense of daily irrigation and simplifying the process. There seems to be no perfect way to sterilize.


            SCI Nurse,KLD, My father's doctor suggested daily irrigation because the catheter was getting blocked. In retrospect, I think my father was not drinking enough water to keep it unobstructed. After reading some of the posts, I've encouraged him to drink the water and am hoping he will not have to do daily irrigation afterall. There is hope.

            Thanks again to all of you!!

            Comment


              #7
              Question to ChesBay on Catheter Irrigation

              Originally posted by ChesBay View Post
              The out of pocket cost might not be practical for you but I have found it easier and a lot less work buying new Syringes. I pay $9.00 for a box of 25 plus S&H.

              I have been getting 60cc sterile syringes ( they have many sizes & types) from this Vet supply company for about three years. reliable and good to do business with.

              http://www.shopmedvet.com/category/vet-syringe
              ChesBay,

              Thank you for sharing this suggestion. I love the idea of being sure about proper sterilization. Are you ordering item #60CCVCT? I just want to make sure it fits with the catheter.

              Kindest Regards,

              Lacath

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by lacath View Post
                ChesBay,

                Thank you for sharing this suggestion. I love the idea of being sure about proper sterilization. Are you ordering item #60CCVCT? I just want to make sure it fits with the catheter.

                Kindest Regards,

                Lacath
                Apologies for falling off the grid in regard to this topic. Yes, I am using, "#60CCVCT" syringes. I use them on Coloplast 14Fr catheter and it is a good fit.
                I do intermittent cathertization and once a day I do instillation / irrigation , I cath out emptying my bladder and then with cath still in I slowly inject 60 cc's of a, "Neomycin & Polymyxin B sulfates for irrigation" solution. I mix a 1 ml ampule with 500 ml of .09% sodium Chloride Irrigation. ( I use a small syringe to extract antibiotic out of ampule.) each batch lasts about 8 days.

                I have found the customer service at Shop Med Vet to be helpful and wouldn't hesitate to give a call w/ any questions re: cath fitting syringe.

                Hope this helps , let me know if you have any questions,
                Best, ches

                Here is a New Mobility article describing the process I use :
                http://www.newmobility.com/articleViewIE.cfm?id=11854

                Comment


                  #9
                  How about nuking it in the microwave oven? If it's dry, the only conductive material in it is the bugs you want to kill

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by smashms
                    what about just rinsing in the sink with extremely hot water and let air dry then put back together and put cap back on??
                    That would clean it, but certainly not sterilize it. Again, there is little or no justification for daily catheter irrigations. It is discouraged by the practice standard for indwelling catheter care written by the CDC. It should be reserved for dealing with clogged catheters or those plugged with clots.

                    For those who need to do bladder instillation of meds (such as Renacidin) routinely (not irrigation), it is best to use a new 60 cc. catheter-tipped syringe each time. If that is not possible, this type of piston syringe can be separated and washed in the dishwasher as long as you have it on the highest water heat setting. Once it has air-dried, then it can be reassembled, but be sure to not touch the inside of the barrel or the tip with anything before use. This is also not technically sterile, but it is very clean (and cleaner than washing in the sink).

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by smashms
                      what about just rinsing in the sink with extremely hot water and let air dry then put back together and put cap back on??
                      Thank you, Ashley for the suggestion and I apologize for taking awhile to get back. I am a rather intermittent Internet user. Anyway, as I've been reading through these posts on this topic, it sounds as though even with boiling for 10 or 15 minutes, it is still not technically sterilized. In light of that, I feel more comfortable going with what is already sterilized. See the Chesbay post on this thread. At least I will know it is actually sterilized.

                      I followed your link and just happened to have received an e-mail newsletter article that may be of interest to you: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/ar...e-on-gaps.aspx
                      I just received this a few days ago. I don't know that much about it but it gets into the topic of MS further along in the article. Hope there is something helpful there.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by rfbdorf View Post
                        How about nuking it in the microwave oven? If it's dry, the only conductive material in it is the bugs you want to kill
                        rfbdorf,

                        Thank you for the suggestion.

                        I've been mulling this one over.

                        Do you know of anyone that has done that? I am concerned about the amount of time to leave it in the microwave and whether that could effect the sensitive substance that coats the black tip. If I don't nuke the piston and syringe long enough, it may not be sterilized. If I nuke it too much, I may soften that tip coating or the plastic such that the sterilized water could be effected. I like the idea of getting the less expensive sterilized piston syringes because I can use it once, toss and know it is properly sterilized. It seems cheap, simple and sure. I sure appreciate your feedback though. Thanks.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by smashms
                          you cannot steralize medical supplies unless you have a home sterilizer it just won't work. it is better to get a new syringe and use a new one every day!!

                          Thanks, Ashleigh,

                          That sounds like the most sure way to know it is sterilized.

                          Comment

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