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Come Visit Topolino at Abilities Expo May 20-22

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    Come Visit Topolino at Abilities Expo May 20-22

    Looking forward to seeing and meeting everyone at the NY/NJ Abilities Expo next weekend! Come out and see the new Topolino wheels, in black and RED!

    Abilities Expo
    Booth 524
    May 20-22
    NJ Convention & Expo Center
    Last edited by Jim; 12 May 2011, 1:08 PM.

    #2
    Be sure to have an assortment of different length quick release axles available.
    stephen@bike-on.com

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      #3
      will be there! See you then!
      "Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot nothing's going to get better. It's not." - Dr. Seuss

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        #4
        Stephen212, Is there anything in particular you need or are looking for?

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          #5
          Originally posted by Topolino Joe View Post
          Stephen212, Is there anything in particular you need or are looking for?
          Assuming there's an opportunity to try out a set of your wheels (559s, BTW), it would be necessary to make sure that I could fit them on my chair.

          Fair assumption?

          What's the hub width of the Topolino?
          stephen@bike-on.com

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            #6
            Don't want to hijack but Dr Young is speaking at the Expo, 2pm Saturday.

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              #7
              That's great to hear! Our Founder and Head Engineer Rafe Schlanger will be presenting as well, on Saturday:

              12:30pm - 1:30pm
              Reinventing the Wheelchair Wheel
              Rafe Schlanger, President & Founder, Topolino Technology
              Ever wonder what goes into the development of your wheelchair wheels? One of the experts in wheel development joins us to share an overview of wheels and how they are built - particularly wheelchair wheels. This is an excellent opportunity to learn from an industry insider about upcoming product developments and the ways that lower weight wheels will benefit the wheelchair user.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Topolino Joe View Post
                Head Engineer Rafe Schlanger will be presenting as well, on Saturday: Reinventing the Wheelchair Wheel
                don't take this the wrong way, but isn't replacing a 1-piece solid hub with a 3-piece bonded one with non-replaceable spokes a step backward? Correct me if I'm wrong, I don't know much about your wheels.

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                  #9
                  Excellent question! Our wheels are actually made from two composite halves, with the spokes bonded as part of the complete half. This actually reduces the number of separate parts, and makes for an incredibly strong and smooth riding wheel. You don't have multiple separate spokes hooked or fastened into the hub, straining the hub (see attached link for more info). Our spokes actually form part of the hub, running through and supporting it to form the composite half of the wheel. This design, unique to the industry, is what saves weight, while adding to the strength of the entire wheel. It's also the same design and materials we've been using in our cycling wheels, which have been raced on some of the toughest courses in the world!

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                    #10
                    i took mine to the bicycle shop to have 2" knobby put on them and all the guys working there were drooling over them, they don't carry topolino bicycle wheels and have never seen them, but were quite impressed.

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                      #11
                      We are happy to have you try out our wheels at the Abilities Expo! We'll have an assortment at the show and will try to include a 559 set as well.

                      Our wheels take a standard 1/2" axle, so we are able to use your existing axle from your chair. Our actual hub width is 2.9", but the internal bearing spacing can vary between the standard 1.9" and 2.3", to fit any axle. This also means a slightly narrower overall width (versus 3.1" or 3.2" for Spinergy), depending on your axle and receiver configuration.

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                        #12
                        Nice to hear. Our wheels can be trued and serviced (not that they will need it) by any reputable bike shop. We use standard sized nipples that fit a bike shop's spoke wrench - just like our cycling wheels!

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                          #13
                          Seeing as it's integrated/bonded into the hub, what's involved in repairing a broken spoke on the Topolino?
                          stephen@bike-on.com

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                            #14
                            Variable internal spacing? That's a really nice idea. Fewer parts? Another win. Lighter? Stronger?

                            I've only ever broken a spoke on sports chair, but that does seem like a compromise in the Topolino design.
                            "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                            "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                              Seeing as it's integrated/bonded into the hub, what's involved in repairing a broken spoke on the Topolino?
                              Excellent question! Curiosity got the best of me . . . so I went trolling.

                              from Topolino:

                              "WHAT HAPPENS IF I BREAK A SPOKE?
                              Topolino's carbon fiber spokes are incredibly strong and tough. Further, these spokes are not subject to flex fatigue like steel spokes, because they cannot move where they join the hub and do not experience the bend and squirm associated with conventional steel spokes. A small cosmetic nick in the spoke should normally be no problem. If a spoke ever does somehow fail, half of the spokes and one side of the hub are removed and replaced as one modular piece. Although not as inexpensive as a traditional steel spoke, the process is relatively straightforward (no special tools) and these replacement "halves" are provided at a very reasonable cost."
                              Chas
                              TiLite TR3
                              Dual-Axle TR3 with RioMobility DragonFly
                              I am a person with mild/moderate hexaparesis (impaired movement in 4 limbs, head, & torso) caused by RRMS w/TM C7&T7 incomplete.

                              "I know you think you understand what you thought I said, but what I don't think you realize is that what you heard is not what I meant."
                              <
                              UNKNOWN AUTHOR>

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