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How to get Tar/Dried Asphalt off tires?

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    How to get Tar/Dried Asphalt off tires?

    How??

    I rolled over some hot asphalt that lay over a sidewalk corner (recently, as it was still warm). It has dried and is now coated on my tires. It's encrusted and looks very nasty. Scraping is not getting much off at all (it's pretty flat on tire surface) and soap doesn't seem to be working either.

    I'll try getting some help to scrape, but it will be a pretty tedious and laborious task which I know no one is going to be too eager to do. So, I'd like to know what will be effective in cleaning or dissolving it? In my search, I'm reading warnings about using chemicals or solvents, as they may damage tires.

    Will Mineral Spirit work? Goo Gone? Just plain soap and water (maybe need to leave it on longer)?

    Will it just flake off in time?

    I'd appreciate any suggestions. Thanks!
    Last edited by chick; 10 May 2011, 8:35 PM.

    #2
    sometimes WD40 will cut it. good luck! :-)

    Comment


      #3
      I'm sure WD-40 will get it off - may have to spray it on and let it sit a bit and may have to apply and wipe off several times to get it all, but it'll do the job. Once it's all off, wipe the tire with soapy water, then rinse with clear water to get all of the WD-40 off. I'm sure this will get it off and don't think it will do any damage to the tire. (I used this method to get tar/asphalt off of my dog's paw when he walked through it and it worked like a charm. Really. Vet said this was fine as long as all the WD-40 was removed with soapy then clear water.)
      Do not confuse silence with consent or fatigue for indifference.

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        #4
        if you have an "old" can of wd-40, that use to work before they changed it. ZEP lubricant works good if you can get some of it.

        Comment


          #5
          Tire

          Denatured ALcohol will work as well just dont ge too much on her self it burns and stays cloths
          What ever doesn't kill you makes you stronger

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            #6
            We just use some good ol' gasoline, although thats pretty pricey right now.

            Comment


              #7
              You can get bug and tar remover at auto parts place.
              MEK will take it off. But its bad stuff. Rubber gloves, outside in the wind.
              Might try GO-JO. Slower but less toxic.

              Comment


                #8
                careful with petroleum products! you don't want them to eat your rubber. I would do a test area with some mineral spirits. fatdad's bug and tar remover probably good too. MEK = methylethylketone - eats everything! I think they finally outlawed it here in Canada. I think I have organ damage from using it on aircraft some years ago.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Be wary of petroleum based solvents.

                  Is it possible to get a friend to take your wheels to a car wash and pressure wash the tires? Careful of the bearings.
                  Foolish

                  "We have met the enemy and he is us."-POGO.

                  "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it."~Edgar Allan Poe

                  "Dream big, you might never wake up!"- Snoop Dogg

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think I would cut to the chase and just replace the tires. They'll need it eventually. Sucks to spend money, but I think I'd rather part with $25 than struggle with tar on rubber. Call me lazy.




                    Originally posted by chick View Post
                    How??

                    I rolled over some hot asphalt that lay over a sidewalk corner (recently, as it was still warm). It has dried and is now coated on my tires. It's encrusted and looks very nasty. Scraping is not getting much off at all (it's pretty flat on tire surface) and soap doesn't seem to be working either.

                    I'll try getting some help to scrape, but it will be a pretty tedious and laborious task which I know no one is going to be too eager to do. So, I'd like to know what will be effective in cleaning or dissolving it? In my search, I'm reading warnings about using chemicals or solvents, as they may damage tires.

                    Will Mineral Spirit work? Goo Gone? Just plain soap and water (maybe need to leave it on longer)?

                    Will it just flake off in time?

                    I'd appreciate any suggestions. Thanks!
                    "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                    "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Vegetable oil should work as well.
                      Doh!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Thanks everyone!

                        I haven't been able to get help with this yet, but given some debate (here and various online sites/forums) regarding the use of WD-40 and other petroleum-based products like Mineral Spirits, I should stay just stay away from them, just to on the safe side.

                        I'll try this Bowdens Bug and Tar spray and see if it helps.

                        I'll try scraping some more, but like I said, it's pretty flat on the surface, almost like it's painted on. I'm thinking that pressure washing (if I could even do that) wouldn't really get something like that off? But then again, I've never tried, so can't say I know what I'm talking about.

                        I'll test spot treat with vegetable oil to see if that helps lubricate and loosen enough.

                        BTW the tires are on wheels my powerchair, so they're not easily removable to clean and definitely not so cheap to replace (else my lazy butt would do it in a hot second!).

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Gas or diesel will take it right off. Shouldn't hurt the tire unless you soak them in it.

                          May try warming it up with a hair dryer/heat gun.
                          Last edited by Sh1wn; 11 May 2011, 3:46 PM. Reason: added info
                          c3/c4, injured 2007

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Vegi oil or Crisco.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Brake parts cleaner found in the automotive section of most major retailers or Wally World. It works awesome!

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