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  • air bed

    Thirty years ago when I was hurt I was in an "air bed" not an air mattress.
    It was a big box full of sand that air blew up through. Do they still exist? I have searched and find nothing. Anyone know a different name for it to search?
    thanks

  • #2
    This sounds like an air-fluidized bed. Currently the most commonly use brand is called the Clinitron II (Hill-Rom) although KCI also makes one. We only use them for people recovering from myocutaneous flap surgery who are on total bedrest for pressure ulcers. Inappropriate use can be associated with hip contracture development, dehydration, disorientation, and other problems. Most do not have a high-low feature either, so transfers can be difficult/dangerous. The bed by itself weighs 1800 lb.

    A LAL (low air loss) mattress is much better for many different reasons for prevention of skin breakdown.

    (KLD)
    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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    • #3
      Thanks. You can always depend on a nurse!

      Comment


      • #4
        hlll rom clinitron air fluidized bed

        yes they still exist. booking them for home care you get the fluidization in your torso and sacral leg area and air baffles for head and shoulders.

        no pressure. heals sores in half the time. you book them out of south carolina
        $3700/month rental with a $3700 deposit. Sometimes they do offer a bit of a discount.

        I had stage 2 ulcer healed in 2 1/2 weeks. have had others down to the bone. also no pain with no pressure nice....

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        • #5
          Originally posted by leeivar44 View Post
          yes they still exist. booking them for home care you get the fluidization in your torso and sacral leg area and air baffles for head and shoulders.

          no pressure. heals sores in half the time. you book them out of south carolina
          $3700/month rental with a $3700 deposit. Sometimes they do offer a bit of a discount.

          I had stage 2 ulcer healed in 2 1/2 weeks. have had others down to the bone. also no pain with no pressure nice....
          There is a Clinitron-At-Home model, very similar to the Clinitron II which is used in hospitals. The one you describe above is the RiteHite, which is not the same as a Clinitron.

          KCI also makes an air-fluidized bed. It is called the Fluid Air.

          (KLD)
          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

          Comment


          • #6
            Hi KLD and any others who know,

            I hope it's okay to ask about your mention that the low air loss mattress was better.

            My Dad is currently on a low air loss mattress. The hospital bed frame allows him to sit him upright (70 degrees upright for back, feet drops at an angle of 45 degrees) since the staff wasn't getting my Dad out of bed -- and, the RT wanted to help to get my Dad to sit up.

            The bed doesn't have movement (not visible). He was on a "rotating" bed at the previous facility. In the ICU, he was on a bed (which seemed to have a ripple effect -- I'll check the model).

            Is the low air loss mattress the best? Is it best to find a bed that has both movement and low air loss? Any recs on brands and models?

            R there any recommended hospital bed frames?

            Gosh - I found out that insurance won't pay for the mattress unless my Dad has a pressure sore -- they'll only pay for a mattress along with a type of pad. The wound nurse said that she would check into a monthly rental and if insurance allows for us to pay the difference (but she thinks it's a "no" for the latter).

            Does anyone know of options?
            Last edited by Joey_SF; 04-17-2012, 07:34 PM. Reason: Typo

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            • #7
              So called Alternating pressure mattresses are pretty much worthless. There is no good scientific evidence that alternating pressure vs. sustained low pressure (such as is provided from a low air loss mattress) is in any way superior or even equivilent to the pressure reduction you can get with LAL. In addition, LAL helps to reduce moisture effects on the skin (sweat, urine or stool incontinence, etc.) which are factors in much skin breakdown.

              There are turning LAL mattresses. They are about 1/3-1/2 again as expensive as a non-turning LAL mattress. The best ones will turn up to 40 degrees. We don't use these in the hospital, where staff are already paid to and expected to turn the patients. We do use them some for home care where there is no one available to do turns, or where doing so would be an undue burden on family members. I am lucky to work in the VA where we are not held to the ridiculous Medicare standards.

              Unfortunately, as you say, Medicare does not pay for these products for prevention....I guess they would not have any problems paying for pressure ulcers acquired at home, but they are sure not going to pay for prevention!!

              You might want to explore purchasing a good quality turning LAL mattress if you are going to take your father home. I see them regularly on eBay. I would stick to major brands such as Invacare, Joerns, Hill-Rom, etc.

              (KLD)
              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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              • #8
                Who would repair a mattress bought from eBay or elsewhere if it has a problem after warranty period (if there is a warranty?)
                Alan

                Proofread carefully to see if you any words out.

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the mattress tip.

                  Which hospital bed frame would you recommend? especially to help sit up my Dad at 90 degrees and to drop his feet.

                  The good thing is that Medicare will pay for a wheelchair -- but, I'm told that this requires about 1.5 months from the day which he gets home. So, we'll be without a wheelchair for awhile.

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                  • #10
                    The rehab center should be arranging a rental or loaner wheelchair for him to use at home.

                    If you purchase equipment privately (eBay, Craig's List, etc.) find out from the seller who provides service for them. Alternatively, contact the manufacturer and ask them to provide you with a list of trained/certified service companies in your area.

                    (KLD)
                    The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                    • #11
                      I googled and found a brand "Med Aire" - any feedback on this brand and their low air loss mattress?

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                      • #12
                        CLINITRON<SP>
                        i stayed in one for about 6 months for a sore i could have cured in 6 weeks at home. severely ruined my posture. i am a c5 quad 35 years and people always comented how strait i sat in chair. now i have severe curve in spine that i'm going to see a doc about. tried all kinds of wedges, pillows, and stuff to keep me strait. when i first get up in chair i'm fine but after 1 hour a wet noodle. donnie
                        Last edited by rollin' man; 06-02-2012, 05:35 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Joey_SF View Post
                          I googled and found a brand "Med Aire" - any feedback on this brand and their low air loss mattress?
                          The one I am familiar with is not LAL...it is actually an alternating pressure pad (over lay or mattress) which is not as effective for pressure reduction nor for pressure ulcer treatment.

                          Have you looked on eBay? There are a lot of LAL mattresses on sale there now, some with low prices from more well known manufacturers (such as Invacare, Roho, etc.).

                          (KLD)
                          The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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                          • #14
                            Just double checking - I've noted a lot of "low air loss" over lays and wondering if anyone has a great over lay.

                            Or, is the full mattress the logical and definite best thing to get?

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                            • #15
                              Overlay LAL pads nearly all bottom out too easily, esp. if the head of the bed is ever elevated. A full replacement LAL mattress is much superior for pressure reduction.

                              (KLD)
                              The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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