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  • public restroom risks

    I've designed a closed front toilet seat with integrated aids to ease transfers. Unfortunately, the ADA does not specify the toilet seat. As a result toilet seats are left to other standard bodies like the UPC and IPC.
    Both the UPC and IPC have specified that only open face toilet seats can be used in public facilities. In an ADA diagram showing a diagonal transfer on an open face toilet seat, it appears to be very dangerous with a gap at the front of the seat. Does anyone have an opinion on this subject?
    16
    No, I don't use public restrooms
    6.25%
    1
    No, I use public restrooms, but have never fallen
    75.00%
    12
    Yes, due to a loose seat hinge
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, due to my chair backing away
    6.25%
    1
    Yes, during the lowering or raising of clothing
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, due to slipping or catching on the open face of the seat
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, while reaching for toilet paper
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, due to my inexperience
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, due to a inadequate or damaged toilet seat
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, due to the seat being different from my one at home?
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, I fell and was injured
    0.00%
    0
    Yes, as a result of inadequate support aids
    12.50%
    2

    The poll is expired.


  • #2
    public restroom risks

    deleted because it was a duplication
    Last edited by Stephen6s; 11-24-2010, 11:18 AM. Reason: duplicate

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    • #3
      public restroom risks

      Duplicate deleted
      Last edited by Stephen6s; 11-24-2010, 11:20 AM. Reason: duplicate

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      • #4
        public restroom risks

        Is is just me or is it more difficult to perform a diagonal transfer to a toilet seat with an open front than a closed front toilet seat?

        In Figures 6(a) and 6(b) of Appendix A to Part 1191 - Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities, it is clearly shown that the transfer from a wheelchair seat to a toilet seat is achieved with only the wheel chair and toilet seat for support. The grab bars only come into effect once the individual is on the water closet seat and are used almost exclusively for positioning. This, in my mind, makes the toilet seat the most important built in aid for transfers in a public restroom.

        In Fig 6(a) it appears that the best first point of landing on the public toilet seat,is where they have removed the seating surface in the open front toilet seat design

        Today, the most widely used standards for public restrooms dictate open front toilet seats, ONLY. I would like to amend the standard to allow elongated closed front toilet seats, but I need evidence pointing to the danger of the missing front portion of the open front seat.

        If you have any comments on this subject I would greatly appreciate them.

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        • #5
          I like the open seat, it make it easier to reach my junk. I don't know what the manual says but I use the grab bars to transfer from my chair to the seat. In fact in my home I have open front toilet seats.

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          • #6
            Women who do self cath on the toilet seat would find the closed toilet seat MUCH more difficult to use than those with an open front, regardless of the method used for transfers.

            (KLD)
            The SCI-Nurses are advanced practice nurses specializing in SCI/D care. They are available to answer questions, provide education, and make suggestions which you should always discuss with your physician/primary health care provider before implementing. Medical diagnosis is not provided, nor do the SCI-Nurses provide nursing or medical care through their responses on the CareCure forums.

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            • #7
              Just curious, why do you need to transfer onto a public toilet? I cath from my chair and do my BP at home, so have never needed (thankfully, so far) to use a public crapper.
              stephen@bike-on.com

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              • #8
                Originally posted by stephen212 View Post
                Just curious, why do you need to transfer onto a public toilet? I cath from my chair and do my BP at home, so have never needed (thankfully, so far) to use a public crapper.
                Well, I haven't been as lucky as you.

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                • #9
                  Amen to that, stephen212. Putting my hand on a public toilet is the last thing I'm gonna do immediately prior to cathing. Pooping in public? No way. More about preparation than luck, IMO. My poop stays put until I dig it out, guess thats my good luck!
                  "I have great faith in fools; self-confidence my friends call it." - Edgar Allen Poe

                  "If you only know your side of an issue, you know nothing." -John Stuart Mill, On Liberty

                  "Even what those with the greatest reputation for knowing it all claim to understand and defend are but opinions..." -Heraclitus, Fragments

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                  • #10
                    i despise the open front seats! i only ever see them in america... if the ada actually expects you to transfer while holding onto the toilet seat and not grabbars, then i suppose that explains the sorry state of us 'disabled access' toilets. in europe and most of the rest of the world, you generally have 3 grabbars within reach the whole time, and you never have to put your hands on the toilet seat. i dont think ive ever done that, and i doubt id have enough balance to transfer that way - which is why when in the us i can only use a restroom with grabbars that are safe enough for me to hold onto, and i have to use at least 1 supplementary suction one.

                    i truly dont understand why, when the ada covers so much so well, 'accessible' toilets in the us are so inadequate.

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                    • #11
                      I sit sideways and spread the legs, if you don't have trunk control you will fall over though
                      Injured:10-16-04
                      C7/C8, T1 incomplete;


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                      • #12
                        I've done what Mr Coffee says ... but I also hate the open front (though I don't have to self-cath) .... my pants get caught up on them when I'm trying to dress! I've actually ripped underwear/pants in that way!
                        Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                        T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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                        • #13
                          Do Public Restrooms adequately meet the needs of people in wheelchairs

                          The quick answer is no. But the more challenging problem is quantifying and catergorizing the problem so that it can be effectively dealt with.

                          It seems to me that paraplegics represent a class of individuals that have good mobility and yet face some of the largest challenges in using a restroom away from their home.

                          Yet the definition in terms of catergorization of the challenges and determining the magnitude of each and the simply prioritizing them in a way that they can be worked to resolution seems very difficult.

                          The result is..... back to the quick answer..... NO, Public Restrooms do not adequately meet the needs of individuals in wheelchairs.

                          The simpliest two questions that can be asked to size the problem are:
                          1) How many Pars (paraplegics) feel confident in using a Public restroom when one is available.
                          2) How many Pars (paraplegics) choose not to use a public restroom for any reason.

                          The next questions are why will Pars not use public restrooms.
                          1) They are not confident that they can safely transfer to and from their wheelchairs to the toilet seat with the aids provided.
                          2) They are concerned about the difficulties associated with lowering or raising their clothing.
                          3) They don't feel that they can count on the availability of an accessible toilet compartment when they need it.
                          4) They don't believe that it provides the cleanliness necessary to use the toilet seat as a support aid.
                          5) They don't believe that it provides the cleanliness for working with Caths.

                          This website has the largest group of Pars on the Planet, from what I can tell.

                          If everyone could take a moment and answer these questions I will tabulate the results and publish them on this forum for everyone to see.

                          If nothing else it's a good foundation for future discussions with standards bodies that have impact on well your needs are met.

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                          • #14
                            i've traveled around a lot in the u.s. by car and have visited many public restrooms. the biggest problem i have really noticed is that often cannot get chair in front of most toilets to cath and still be able to close stall door. sometimes i can go at an angle, but the long toilets are really hard to straddle. as for sitting on the toilet, there is usually so much piss on the floor i wouldn't even think about droppin my drawers

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                            • #15
                              And the grab-bars are usually on a diagonal slant for people who can stand so they can grip them to stand from a seated position ... does not work so well with your wrist on a slant when transferring (in fact a good way to hurt yourself!)
                              Roses are red. Tacos are enjoyable. Don't blame immigrants, because you're unemployable.

                              T-11 Flaccid Paraplegic due to TM July 1985 @ age 12

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